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Dead Space 2 DLC Packs Unlocked on PC

| 10 Feb 2011 14:54
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PC gamers may be able to gain access to console-exclusive Dead Space 2 suits and weapons DLC after all, thanks to an edited save file that purports to unlock the items that were already in the game.

Back in January, EA revealed three suit-and-weapons DLC bundles for Dead Space 2, the Supernova Pack, Hazard Pack and Martial Law Pack, offering unique bonuses to players for 400 Microsoft Points or $5 each. Sadly, much like the Dead Space 2: Severed DLC, they were also announced as console exclusives. But are they?

Not according to people in an ongoing discussion in the Steam forums, where a link to an edited save game that apparently unlocks all the suits in the game, including those available via the DLC packs, is now making the rounds. The installation process is very simple and while situations like this are always "buyer beware," several Steam users have confirmed that the save does in fact work.

The conversation originally began on EA's own Dead Space forums but migrated to Steam after EA deleted the thread, a move that undeniably contributes to the feeling that this is the real deal. And since the save file is tiny - 3.4K in size - it's obvious that it doesn't contain the DLC data but merely unlocks it, meaning that the code was present in the game all along. This naturally leads to the question of why EA made the DLC bundles console only, since it clearly didn't take an act of rocket surgery to open them up on the PC. It's possible that the publisher does plan to "release" it for the PC at some point in the future, but even if so, why delay it at all?

We've reached out to EA for more information and will let you know what they have to say, if anything. In the meantime, you can find out more about the PC DLC situation and, if you're feeling brave, snag a copy of the edited save file at Steam's Dead Space discussion forum. Bear in mind that this does not constitute any kind of endorsement of the save; I haven't tried it, I can't verify its safety and if you end up nuking your entire system into oblivion, it's all on you.

via: Techspotlight

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