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Week in Review: DLC, Lava, and Supreme Court Rulings

| 2 Jul 2011 11:00

In this week's edition, Mario meets a rather warm end, and the Supreme Court rules in favour of gaming.

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SMB Box Art Ends Badly for Mario

There aren't many games that would show their hero dying on the box, but Super Mario Bros. isn't just any old game. While it tries to hide it, the box art clearly shows the world's most famous plumber leaping to his death in a pool of molten lava. It's not the most heroic way to introduce a character, but then again, Mario's first job was picking on monkeys, so maybe it's ok. (Link)


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Bethesda Eyes Expansion Pack Model for Skyrim DLC

A few games in, and Bethesda is still getting the hang of DLC. After the infamous "Horse Armor" for Oblivion and a "chaotic" release schedule for the Fallout games, it says that the DLC for Skyrim will be more akin to the expansion packs of old. This will undoubtedly be happy news for people worried about the value of DLC, not to mention RPG fans all over the world. (Link)


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Silent Hill Movie Sequels Keeps Creepy Nurses

Apparently, you can't make a Silent Hill movie without including some faceless nurses in tight outfits. A series of pictures from the set of the Silent Hill sequel, Revelations 3D shows that the medical monstrosities will once again be stalking the streets of the cursed town, along with Carrie Anne Moss and Adelaide Clemens. Hit the link for a gallery. (Link)


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World of Warcraft Gets Extended F2P Trial

There's never been a better time to give World of Warcraft a try as Blizzard has decided to make the first twenty levels of the game free to play. There are still certain restrictions, like not being able to use any of the game's auction houses or send messages, but other than that, the entire game is available, for as long as you want to play. It's hard to argue with a deal like that. (Link)


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Supreme Court Rules in Favor of Videogames

The Supreme Court has struck down a California law which would have made it illegal to sell mature rating videogames as unconstitutional. As part of his decision, Judge Scalia said that there might be cultural difference between reading classic literature and playing Mortal Kombat, but there wasn't a constitutional one. (Link)

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