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Wolfenstein's Hardest Difficulty Will Make You Cry Blood

| 23 Jun 2013 09:23
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"I am Death Incarnate," the game's hardest difficulty setting and a reference to the original Wolfenstein 3D will not be for the weak of heart.

If there is one thing id software's early shooters were known for, it was the ability to turn the difficulty up to impossibly brutal levels. I'm sure every gamer worth his or her salt remembers struggling through Doom's "Nightmare" or Wolfenstein 3D's "I am Death Incarnate" difficulty settings. Andreas Ojerfors, Machine Games senior gameplay designer, says that Wolfenstein: The New Order will call back to these roots, as its hardest difficulty level will not be for the weak of heart.

"You will cry blood," he told Gamespot. The "I Am Death Incarnate" difficulty option will return in The New Order, and Ojerfors says that contrary to games that are designed around the easy mode and then ramped up for the more difficult modes, The New Order was designed with advanced difficulty in mind.

"We want it to be a real, real challenge for people. This is not an easy game. Of course we have the five difficulty levels of the original Wolfenstein 3D, like everything from 'Daddy Can I Play?' to 'I Am Death Incarnate'. So you can turn it down or turn it up if you want to. But like the default, normal setting of the game, it's going to be a challenging experience."

One of the problems many gamers have with difficulty settings is when developers simply make the enemy "cheap" and "unfair," rather than more challenging. Ojerfors says this won't be the case with The New Order. "It's difficult, but it's always fair. You're never really cheated. It's always your fault if you die."

Wolfenstein: The New Order launches for the Xbox 360, Xbox One, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, and PC later this year. Bethesda's vice president of PR and marketing recently said that the game won't feature a tacked-on multiplayer mode because the Machine Games wanted to focus on the singleplayer.

Source: Gamespot

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