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Ringly Bluetooth-Enabled Ring Notifies User for Text Messages and Calls

| 15 Jun 2014 18:07
Ringly

Cocktail ring "Ringly" connects to smartphones via Bluetooth and will send the wearer a notification via light or vibration for new phone alerts.

While companies like Google and Samsung are pushing for wearable tech with glasses and watches, there's another company entering the fray, and it's introducing Bluetooth-enabled rings. Founded by former Flickr vice president Christina Mercando who ventured to make wearable tech that's actually stylish, "Ringly" (also the name of the device)is a ring with a stone that links to your phone and alerts the user when a new call, text, social media mention comes in. Once connected to your smartphone, Ringly lights up or vibrates when a notification arrives, and what's more, the number of vibrations and light colors can be customized so you'll know if the new push notification from Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc. alert is either from your friend, significant other and whatnot.

Mercando mentions that she had the idea for the smart jewelry since she hated missing text messages whenever she left her phone in her bag, and didn't want to leave her phone on the table during social gatherings.

I continued to miss calls and texts from my friends and family because my phone was in my purse, and I hated leaving it on the table during social outings...I just kept looking at my rings and thinking, "I've got to be able to put technology in here that will let me solve the problem."

Inside each Ringly device is a tiny circuit board that allows the ring to sync via Bluetooth either an Android or iOS app. Presently, Ringly's first release has four stone options matted with 18K gold and will be priced between $145 to $180 for pre-orders, and at retail, will hit $195 to $260 per ring. You can read more and order the device by checking the official site.

While the device's design is obviously slanted for female use, the company mentions that they want to use the tech it has developed for other wearable designs in the future.

Source: FastCodeDesigns via BuzzFeed

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