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From Mass Effect's Unsung Heroine to The End of Games as We Know It

| 4 Aug 2014 17:22
Mass Effect's Dr Chakwas

Hello, Escapist readers! As part of our partnership with curation website Critical Distance, we'll be bringing you a weekly digest of the coolest games criticism, analysis and commentary from around the web. Let's hit it!

Kicking us off, at Paste, Maddy Myers admonishes game designers to take another look at Metroid and Alien if they intend to make Metroidvanias. It's not enough, she argues, to borrow mechanical tropes and conventions, or even to feature a playable woman protagonist in your winding space platformers without also acknowledging the "aesthetic and tonal success" of Metroid's and Alien's universes respectively. (Content warning: discussion of rape.)

Meanwhile, The Mary Sue's Jennifer Culp invites us to take another look at the badassery of one Dr. Karin Chakwas, Mass Effect's Chief Medical Officer. Culp sings the doctor's praises while also observing the dearth of visible--let alone active and interesting--older women in videogames,

In a medium in which women are often fridged early on in order to provide narrative development for male characters, in a real world where a distressingly large segment of the population seems to consider women obsolete once we pass mid-life, it's refreshing to encounter an older woman upon first boarding the Normandy.

Next, at Polygon Katherine Cross challenges the hostile anxiety surrounding criticism in videogames, calling it a cultural "terror dream" that games are going to be censored or taken away by nagging parents and moralistic lobbyists. Or just as well, perverted so much by the inclusion of different audiences that the traditional design focus of games as havens for straight, white cis male power fantasies will disappear. (Oh, the humanity.)

Lastly, at Eurogamer Christian Donlan compares two unfinished, procedurally-generated horror games, Monstrum and Darkwood, looking at the various ways they succeed and fall short at designing truly horrific experiences. Donlan looks at how they both handle pacing, mise en scene, perspective and even UI to suggest horror through design, and where those design styles might actually obstruct feelings of horror by making the player too comfortable.

Want more? Be sure to swing over to Critical Distance to have your fill!

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