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Super Bowl Porn: Everybody Scores!

| 2 Feb 2009 19:30
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What was your favorite part of yesterday's Super Bowl telecast: Bruce Springsteen's rockin' half-time show, the exciting last-minute heroics on the field or the dangling wang of Evan Stone, who gave viewers in Tuscon 30 seconds of a whole 'nother kind of action?

With less than three minutes to play, viewers watching the Super Bowl on Tuscon, Arizona-based KVOA-TV got a surprise eyeful when the show was interrupted by about 30 seconds of hardcore porn. According to a BBC report, "The clip showed a woman unzipping a man's trousers, followed by a graphic act between the two."

The Arizona Daily Star said its newsroom was "flooded" with complaints about the swinging schwing, although whether they were the result of the inappropriate content or the fact that people missed 30 seconds of the game is unknown. How the mix-up happened is also unclear; KVOA sends its signal to Comcast via a fiber line, and station president Gary Nielsen said there wasn't any porn on the signal when they sent it out. The Consumerist says the clip was from the cable show Club Jenna and featured the naughty bits of Evan Stone, winner of the 2009 AVN Best Actor Award and star of the 2008 hit The Rage of Bonan.

"We are mortified by last evening's Super Bowl interruption, and deeply apologize to our customers for the inappropriate programming," Comcast spokeswoman Kelle Maslyn said in a statement. "We are aggressively investigating the situation including the possibility of foul play." Comcast has also said it will "compensate" viewers who were affected by Super Bowl the in-and-outage, although how the company will actually do that has not yet been announced.

Comcast is no doubt anxious to get out in front of this in order to avoid the controversy that accompanied Janet Jackson's quarter-second nipple-flash at the end of the 2004 Super Bowl halftime show. The infamous "wardrobe malfunction" launched a tsunami of complaints, crackdowns and a record $550,000 fine against broadcaster CBS, and while a federal appeals court finally dismissed the fine in July 2008, saying the FCC acted "arbitrarily and capriciously" in levying the penalty, sensitivity to "malfunctions" remains high.

To that end, Comcast has set up a special email account which customers can use to express their concerns. Did your Super Bowl include surprise penis? Drop them a line at comcasttusconfeedback@gmail.com.

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