Discuss and rate the last movie you watched

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Ezekiel:
Infernal Affairs (2002, Hong Kong)

Second time watching this. First was about nine years ago. I like it, but The Departed is better. This is a good story, but it's delivered with so much cheese ("I dreamed about you too." Ugh...) and I don't like the soundtrack. Scorsese is also a better director and I found the Americans' acting and how they reacted to the situations more believable, even if the remake was over the top.

I do think the ending was somewhat more interesting than the Departed's version:

The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus
a Terry Gilliam film, that's all anybody who is familiar with his work would need to know if it's for them or not. Though what I was not aware of, until after viewing, was that this happened to be the final character for Heath Ledger, to the point where it remained unfinished, then some plot amendments were made, while convincing other well-known actors to keep in his main role as part of the story and keep it in existence as a mild form of tribute

another thing is that I now feel pretty guilty for only judging Andrew Garfield's talent from those Spiderman Sony films, he shines immensely in this, and looking back I realise those movies hired a fair few respected performers; it goes to show how easily skill can be wasted when you go stunt-casting for cynical cash-ins. Sorry, Andrew!

anyways, the entire film works best going in with an open mind and maybe a dose of THC for good measure. There is a lot of charm and mix of grounded human reality with fantastical dreamy moments that all feel mostly playful, while everybody performs impressively and naturally. It's unique, not for everyone, but I don't regret spending my time in there. A solid Gilliam-hole out of ten

Samtemdo8:

Ezekiel:
Infernal Affairs (2002, Hong Kong)

Second time watching this. First was about nine years ago. I like it, but The Departed is better. This is a good story, but it's delivered with so much cheese ("I dreamed about you too." Ugh...) and I don't like the soundtrack. Scorsese is also a better director and I found the Americans' acting and how they reacted to the situations more believable, even if the remake was over the top.

I do think the ending was somewhat more interesting than the Departed's version:

I kind of agree. The ending of The Departed makes Matt Damon's unfortunate fate (isolation and dishonor) feel somewhat pointless. And then it shows a rat on the window sill. Kind of dumb, honestly. I didn't really need the quotes at the beginning and end of Infernal Affairs to drive the message home, though. Felt too obvious.

The Bad Batch - 5/10

If you want a movie about cannibalism and a young girl discovering herself, watch Raw. If you want some post-apocalyptic desert adventure, watch Mad Max or any of the countless knock offs. It looks good and the soundtrack is good. The acting and the "story" was kind of bad, though. I'm sure I could come up with a lot of reasons explaining how amazing this movie is and draw parallels between this movie and the real world because I spent years selling bullshit to people, but yeah, this movie kind of sucked.

Bright -

Yeah, this isn't the worst film of 2017 as many proclaim it to be. But overall I found it to be just bland and forgettable. It is better than Ayer's last film Suicide Squad though it does suffer from some pretty poor storytelling, weak and confused political ideals as well as poor worldbuilding. Also I like Will Smith, but this just felt like he wasn't even trying. 5/10

Escape Plan - 6/10

Stallone plays a guy who's made a living out of finding weaknesses in prisons and exposing them by getting incarcerated undercover and breaking out. One day he gets a job from the CIA to break out of their newest solution to extra-judicial incarceration of terrorists, the latest and greatest in escape proof prisons. He accepts against the suggestions of his team and things quickly go pear-shaped when the CIA abducts him and he realizes that he's an actual prisoner not just an undercover consultant. In the prison he meets Schwarzenegger who quickly becomes his ally to break out and expose the entire operation.

All in all, it is about as clever and engaging as you'd expect from a movie doing a small twist on the old prison break trope with two washed up action actors. This is not a movie that I can highly recommend, but if you just want to pause your brain and watch Stallone and Schwarzenegger do their thing, this movie is a decent choice. You won't be blown away but you'll get 2 hours of entertainment.

Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (5/10)

Alright, who the fuck said this was better than the original Jumanji? Quite a few people apparently, but...huh?! This film makes the original film look subtle.

Anyway, it's...fine, it's average, it's cliched, I could spot plot points/character development from a mile away, it's a generic action-adventure flik. Oh sure, it pokes some fun at videogame tropes at the start, but before long the film is playing things straight. Oh, and in case you're wondering, it's very clear that the film is set in the same continuity as the original film, but it exists on its own for the most part. Whether that's a good or bad thing is up to you.

There's more I could discuss, but honestly, the film isn't worth it. It's disposable schlock. Enjoyable schlock in some cases, but schlock all the same.

Spring 7/10 (just like Raw, went into this one knowing next to nothing about it. Went to rate it on IMDB and the pictures there kind of spoil everything, so avoid it unless you've seen the movie)

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It's a love story with some horror in the mix, and I liked it a lot. The way the movie blended the cheesy "american guy goes to europe and falls for european girl" with the more horrific stuff was done pretty well. For the longest part I was watching the movie, I was wondering just what the hell is wrong with this girl and the movie takes its time to explain it, but when it does... it's kind of a shame, the magic is lost a little bit, the dialog focuses on this one thing until the end of the movie, to the point where you just know how it will end, because if it ends any other way you'll just go "well, that's bullshit".

Also, I usually despise jump scares because they're not scary and you can predict them, but the one jump scare in this movie got me, so there's that.

IT (2017) *spoilers obviously*

I just watched this last night & wow... seriously enjoyed it!
Firstly, the whole direction the movie took in terms of mood and how they handled the scary moments:
I love a good horror movie, by "good" i don't mean gore & jump scares, and this managed to nail a pervasive sense of dread throughout.
Fans of the book will know how Derry is "Pennywise's Town" in as much as it has been formed around his presence (i think the book states that Derry is "made in his image"). This feeling was decently peppered throughout the movie, you just feel that Derry is bad, in every brick & paving stone.
The scary moments, when they came, hit the target without looking like it was trying too hard, Eg: the slide show appearance..i swear i felt certain internal parts shrink up when he came out of the last slide the way he did.

The kids were, almost without exception, fantastic & utterly convincing in thier roles.
I wanted to punch the air at the climactic showdown when they ganged up on Pennywise.
And speaking of Pennywise... Bill Skarsgard rocked his role. I love everything Tim Curry has done & his original take on the role is quite a bar to meet, but there were moments when the 2017 Pennywise majorly creeped me out with that slightly vacant look behind which you can feel unimaginable malevolence.

I'm waiting for chapter 2, it can't come soon enough.

Well, recently I came across the movie Bright on Netflix. Might be overrated to some but I thought it was kinda cool. I mean there are plenty of existing shows with witches, vampires, and werewolves living in modern day society, but hardly do you get one with the whole fantasy mix thrown in as well. And plus Will Smith? Thought it was pretty enjoyable overall.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6EZCBSsBxko

Recently I started watching Death Note with my girlfriend. The deal was, she shows me Death Note, I show her Cowboy Bebop.


I'm only 10 episodes or so in. My impression was that the show would be about the guy's slow corruption and descent into tyrannical abuse of power, starting out by timidly killing off small fry (assholes in his life et al), moving on to bigger fish who have it coming and then at some point cross the line where he's just as bad or worse than the people he's after.

Turns out all of this happens on the very first episode and mostly off camera. And apparently the show is less about the dude having fun Final Destination style while running the gamut of corruption and more about avoiding getting caught by playing this convoluted chess game with a similarly overachieving rival. It's ridiculous. For every move, the other dude is like 5 ahead, so they're stuck running circles around each other for ages. The fact that the two are Albert Wesker confident about everything that happens doesn't make them or their actions very compelling. They're not characters so much as driving forces.

All of this is captured in that cringey Japanese style of exaggerating everything to the point of bathos.

On the other hand the show's never boring. It throws like 10 different new things every episode and always keeps its wheels spinning. So there's always something new or interesting to look forward. I like the most recent curve ball of killing off a character who I was sure would be a recurring antagonistic presence throughout the show - now and then it's unpredictable like that. And I like how Light's enemies have finally formed a united front and for once the show is building up towards something that doesn't immediately pay off. Also Ryuk's a lot of fun for visual humor.

Gerald's Game
Tis good..can't say much without spoiling, but that's basically how I prefer people to experience anything of quality. Oh boy, there's that one scene though, you'll know it when it happens.

Beasts of no Nation
Probably the best portrayal of how any child can be forced into the duties of a soldier in a warring country. Very real, grounded. A rarely approached topic that is done flawlessly here, cannot recommend enough

Logan lucky
It really does feel like a Coen bros film. That alone is acceptable entertainment for someone as easily pleased as my dumb ass

Blade runner 2049
This is definitely a peak in the art of film-making. I always felt the original really needed a modernised update for the questions we haven't fully explored yet, and this does it with such an unnecessary dedication to the art of audio-visual design that it's impossible to not be captivated by every scene

Black Mirror
It's annoying, the format means that the best method of judging this is episode by episode. That isn't worth it though, but I'd rather not divide them as seasons due to the incredibly varied nature of it all. In the end, all one can hope to say is that it's just all pretty damn good, the waves of quality rise and fall but as with any such entertainment, the whole as a whole gives far more than it takes away. Oh and the music design

Scarface, the 1932 version. Pretty good.

Resident Evil: The Final Chapter

The RE movies have always been a guilty pleasure of mine. They've been the kind of dumb action schlock that soothes a weary soul and Milla Jovovich has done a great job at making blank slate character Alice an actual compelling protagonist. That being said, The Final Chapter is not good. The movie is way too dark, and I am saying this as someone who had nothing but a living candle as the only light source but the TV in the room and I still barely made out what was going on in some scenes. The action sequences are as well choreographed as ever, but the hectic, quick cut editing means that you can barely make out what's actually going on and several scenes are just mindless action filler that serves very little purpose and mostly feels like padding to the run time.

Baskin 4/10 (spoilers)

image

Man, this movie fell apart fast. I don't think I've ever seen a turkish movie before, let alone a turkish horror movie. Basically, five cops answer a call in some bizarre part of the city, and end up walking into some satanic cult rape orgy, or "Hell", apparently. I was enjoying the tension building up very slowly, but as soon as they get to the creepy house, everything goes to hell, no pun intended. The gore and "torture porn" is very well done, but boring and meh. I feel like many scenes in this movie can be explained with a "fuck it, why not?", because plenty of times I was left wondering what the fuck was supposed to be happening. As I was writing this, I discovered the movie is based on a short from the same director, so maybe they didn't manage to expand on it properly, I don't know. I watched it and I liked it more than the actual movie, and it's nice that some of the actors are the same.

Anyway, lots of dream sequences that feel largely disconnected from the rest of the movie, the sole survivor escaping in a ridiculous way, in which he gets a key from his superior's throat in a dream, snaps back to reality and stabs the main baddie in the forehead with it, where he has a keyhole tattoo, even though seconds ago he was chained to a pillar with his hands behind his back. What? Then when he's outside the house, the movie shows him limping, even though he was never hurt in the entirety of the movie. Speaking of "the key", before entering the house, his superior mentions he has the key to solve all this or some shit. So what, he knew what would happen and went in anyway? What was the point of that?

Anyway, he limps the fuck away from the house, finds his way back to the main road, and is then run over by their own police van, solving the mystery of who the van hit earlier in the movie. Is this time travel, is this another dimension, is this another dream? Who knows? The van goes off the road and into a river, and this time, the van is apparently empty. And just to the side you can clearly see a little raft. Maybe a camera crew or rescue, in case the stunt went wrong. Either way, it's hilariously easy to see, I don't know how they missed this.

Here's the short if anyone wants to see it https://vimeo.com/75031229

All the Money in the World
Good premise, great character in Getty and a fantastic performance from Christopher Plummer. Movie should've been about him. When he's not the center of the attention we're stuck with a bland Marky Mark leading a mediocre thriller. I liked Romain Duris as one of the kidnappers though.

Watched The Thin Man, a very good comedy mystery. I was surprised by the sex joke (sexagenarian), then took a brief break and saw that the movie was from 1934, meaning it was Pre-Code, a bit older than I expected. Censorship sucks.

Good Time, 7-8/10.

This is Robert Pattinson's show, and boy howdy is the Twilight prettyboy far in the past at this point. The amount of screentime where he's not visible amounts to maybe 15 minutes tops, and he carries the whole movie phenomenally. I'd say he's comparable to James MacAvoy in "Filth" or Tom Hardy in "Locke". To add to how good his performance is, the character he portrays is an irredeemable, reprehensible, amoral idiot, but he never stops being engaging or gets annoying. The filmmaking is lean, intimate and grungy, making you feel like you're really there with the characters. Not a single line of dialogue is wasted, and many scenes play out with a minimal amount of it, which I've grown to love in movies over the past two years.

In a deliberately ironic way, the film's atmosphere is nothing even close to its title. It's a deliberately rough, unpleasant and ugly movie in many ways: the characters and their actions, how they treat each other, the world they inhabit, the visuals, everything has a slight revulsion radiating from it. Especially the red neon tint that's prevalent in many scenes combined with the extremely closeup-focused cinematography makes the film look soggy and disgusting, like rainwater that's accumulated at the bottom of a trash can and mixed with the garbage to create a disgusting slop. But it's just restrained enough to not alienate the viewer. The plot itself could almost serve as a Coen brothers comedy, but it's played dead straight. That's part of the appeal of the film and what makes it engaging: you keep watching to see how the main character is going to fuck up spectacularly next.

Good Time is a good time. Heartily recommended.

Three Billboards in Ebbing, Missouri 4/4

Solid movie that feels like a Coen brother's pastiche, but is actually by the guys who made 7 Psychopaths and In Bruges. As such, it has some impeccably good swearing in it. It is very impressive at switching between being funny and sad moments, often in a matter of seconds, and it does an equally impressive job of getting you to sympathise with some fairly despicable people. It is fairly small ins cope, isn't amazing, but it does everything it tries to do very well. The 4/4 is for the sheer competence.

maninahat:
Three Billboards in Ebbing, Missouri 4/4

Solid movie that feels like a Coen brother's pastiche, but is actually by the guys who made 7 Psychopaths and In Bruges. As such, it has some impeccably good swearing in it. It is very impressive at switching between being funny and sad moments, often in a matter of seconds, and it does an equally impressive job of getting you to sympathise with some fairly despicable people. It is fairly small ins cope, isn't amazing, but it does everything it tries to do very well. The 4/4 is for the sheer competence.

I've been curious about this movie, thanks for the post. I'll take it under advisement.

The Maze Runner and the sequel The Scorch Trials.

The first one is pretty good. Some nice monster design and an intriguing mystery. The action is decent too. 7/10

The sequel sucks. Mystery devolves into Abrams-like mystery boxes (dialog stalls just long enough for something more important to happen...). The environment is less interesting, they even have zombies and faceless goons as fodder *yawn*. Our main character's Jesus vibes grow stronger every second. In the end the movie isn't even about much and not much really happens in it, just chases one after another. Why these mazes existed in the first place ?s revealed in the third movie, right? 3/10

John Ford's "My Darling Clementine"

A great western. And so picturesque.

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The Shape of Water 4/4

It's about a mute janitor who falls in love with a fishman at the secret lab she works in. If you've ever seen Iron Giant then you'll recognise most of the same beats and characters (right down to a paranoid, McCarthy type Government agent villain). Iron Giant wasn't made by Guillermo Del Toro however, so it doesn't have interspecies romance, great costumes and set decoration, or horrifying instances of gore like Water does. You might think a woman falling in love with The creature from the black lagoon might look silly, but by the time they get around to the weird stuff you're engaged enough with the heroes to not mind it.

Another movie that gets 4/4 for exceptional competence, even if it isn't exactly showing you something super new.

Lady Bird (8/10)

Lost the original post I made, so don't feel like retyping it. But, very good movie. I certainly understand why it got so much hype.

Kingsglaive: Final Fantasy XV

Rating: FF Cutscene / 10

Seriously, it was like watching a 90 minutes long cutscene with half the time having no idea of what was going on (be it because the plot was convoluted or the action scenes were visually crowded).

It answered some questions about the game's plot, but it created its own baffling questions that I have no option but to shrug them and move along. Still better than Final Fantasy: Spirits Within, I think...

The Cloverfield Paradox (6/10)

I'm going to make one thing clear before anything else - there was no reason for this to be a Cloverfield movie. True, you could say the same for 10 Cloverfield Lane, but 10CL was a pretty good movie all around, even if it was bereft of any elements that the first movie had. TLP has those elements, but they're forced in and tangental to the main plot. You could cut out the sub-plot on Earth, and the space-plot would remain unaltered. I'd argue that this would actually make the movie better because it would give the movie more time to flesh out the main cast, and I'd argue make the ending better.

But even then, the movie is...mixed. A particle accelerator in space is conducting experiments that will give Earth unlimited energy through a particle accelerator. Which sounds all well and good, except it's established that a lot of the issues on Earth stem from lack of oil. So unless you want these particle accelerators to power electric cars, I'm not sure how that's going to change anything. But it does work, and sends them into an alternate reality...and things get weird. Weird in the sense that the movie seems more supernatural at this point than sci-fi. The idea is that the station from "Universe A" (I'll call it that for ease of reference) takes the same space in Universe B, where another space station was, hence why two elements of the station are meshed together (e.g. a crewmember from Universe B ends up welded into the walls of the station from Universe A. Except even within the station of Universe A, things just jump around. Worms end up in a guy's body (and a doo-hicky because he's that unlucky). A table soccer table has its players spin around, then stop, and this means...nothing. A guy has his arm sucked into a wall, then the arm becomes self-aware and writes to open up the Russian guy to find the dohickey...no idea how the arm knows this. And about that whole replacing stuff thing, it's seen that they haven't ended up in the same location as the station in Universe B, they're on the other side of the sun, yet somehow they destroyed the Universe B station?

So, film is okay, I guess, but its main problem is that it tries to establish the rules of the setting, but quickly becomes a "anything can happen" type supernatural movie. Like, think of Event Horizon meshing with Alien, as if the Nostromo suddenly became possessed by a ghost in addition to the xenomorph running around. That sort of thing. And like I said, the usage of the clover monster feels forced, and tangental, especially given how it undermines the ending.

Assault on Precinct 13 (1976) (4/5)

This one's a longtime favorite of mine, one of those I get an itch to watch while working on something or while eating.

A very "New Hollywood" film for the time, it was John Carpenter's sophomore effort, and despite being of a wildly different genre than the film that would cement his place in cinema history, it's still got his fingerprints all over it. Part western shoot em up, a touch of horror (especially in the fact that the antagonist street gangs are mute and behave like homicidal demons more than men), all with an urban backdrop. The lines aren't particularly spectacular, but Austin Stoker (very under appreciated actor) and Darwin Joston do a great job with what their given and dress it up more than adequately. The plot isn't complex in the least, but it does just as much as it needs to. The soundtrack is minimalist, eerie early synth work all done by Carpenter himself, and the film has a slightly dark but seriously believable feel to it's setting also fitting to John.

Finding Your Feet (6/10)

Didn't really want to see this, but through family & friends, well, don't look a gift horse in the mouth.

Anyway, this movie is...fine. It's average. It's okay. It's better than I thought it would be, as while it's mostly comfort food where you can see plot points coming a mile away, it does have some gravitas to it. Didn't help that I had two old ladies talking behind me constantly - yes, Timothy Spall is a good actor, thanks for telling me.

So, yeah. Decent, better than some reviewers made it out to be, but nothing special.

The Drop
Ok, this title is not the greatest and is more reminiscent of straight-to-tv thriller-action schlock. Not sure what I would've gone with, but it's like naming Scarface' 'coke-riddled shootout' and betrays its intentions.
Tom Hardy impressed again with the natural ability shown when he slips into another character, Noomi Rapace has consistently shown similar talent, though her role is a little less interesting than previous work here. James Gandolfini is...well...James Gandolfini. Nevertheless, best to go in with low knowledge, a recommended experience, plus it has the cutest doggo!

The Hunger Games, the tril...quadriloprofits?
Have only started this, but having read the material beforehand, there are many many thoughts. Most begin with "but why that, tho?" ...and end with "but monies, tho!" Maybe will return with focused bothersomes. It's not bad by any stretch of adaptation, but there are clear decisions poking out like sore molesting thumbs that bring forth a weary sigh and somehow a pitcher of strong alcohol. Where did that come from?? Oh wait, nevermind.

Just finished watching Dunkirk a few minutes ago.

Pretty damn good! I expected it to be quite good, and was surprised to find it pretty damn good indeed.

It's also got a fair amount of eye candy, but that's unrelated to my artistic enjoyment of the film, I swear.

Xsjadoblayde:

The Hunger Games, the tril...quadriloprofits?
Have only started this, but having read the material beforehand, there are many many thoughts. Most begin with "but why that, tho?" ...and end with "but monies, tho!" Maybe will return with focused bothersomes. It's not bad by any stretch of adaptation, but there are clear decisions poking out like sore molesting thumbs that bring forth a weary sigh and somehow a pitcher of strong alcohol. Where did that come from?? Oh wait, nevermind.

As someone who actually likes the Hunger Games films more than the books, I demand an explanation.

The Accident Man - A straight to DVD action film based off of a UK comic called Toxic. Right now, it one of Scott Adkins best action films. Especially in terms of character. Adkins has done spectacular action scenes, but the characters he played often felt 1.5 dimensional. In this film, he carries the charisma well, and some great lines, though Michael J. White has the best ones. The action is clean, easy to follow, and contains none of the shaky cam nonsense. Honestly, if he wants to stay in to direct-to-DVD films, I don't mind, but he needs more recognition in theaters. Here is hoping that someone in Hollywood recognize his talents, give him his own big budget movie. And not just him, but Mike and the others that worked hard on the stunt choreography as well.

The Greatest Showman -

It was alright I guess. Great production values, songs are wonderful and the cast is very good, but I have some issues with the story.

(Side note: I know nothing about the P.T. Barnum backstory at all. I don't care that the film wasn't accurate at all.)

6/10

The Shape of Water 5/10

Looks nice, I guess, and Sally Hawkins is lovely. Still, the dull plot brings it down. Almost every character is comic relief. Idiot balls are flying around. Best Picture and Best Director? Hell no (though I haven't seen any of the other nominees).

I just watched Superman III.....

What the fuck did I just watch? What a complete and utter pile of a movie.

And people said Man of Steel and Superman Returns was bad?!

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