Looking into the Future of Game Physics with an Indie Dev at Its Forefront

In 2004, two very different first-person shooters differentiated themselves from the crowd with their boundary-pushing technology. Doom 3, released in August, didn’t quite fit the Doom lineage, but it made for a dynamite tech demo of Id’s advanced new lighting engine. Then in November, Half-Life 2 reshaped the games industry in its own image, partially on the strength of its unprecedented physics simulations. Since a decade and a half ago, game engines haven’t exactly stagnated, but AAA games have rarely made those kinds of sudden, massive, era-defining advances either. For those, we increasingly need to look to the indie scene. … Continue reading Looking into the Future of Game Physics with an Indie Dev at Its Forefront