The classic film Dr. Strangelove: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb was released on this day in 1964. To celebrate its arrival into this world we give you a gallery of some of the best films by its director, Stanley Kubrick. Viddy well my droogs.

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Kubrick’s 1956 noir classic The Killing featured Sterling Hayden as he tries to pull off a robbery. And he would have gotten away with it too, if it weren’t for those meddling kids cops.

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Paths of Glory was released in 1957 with Kirk Douglas as Colonel Dax. It was banned in France until 1975 because of its negative portrayal of the French military. Sounds like a sore subject for the French.

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2001: A Space Odyssey came out of a collaboration between Stanley Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke. I think that we’re all waiting for someone to dig up Tycho and see if there really is a monolith down there just aching for some sun.

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Clockwork Orange may have gotten a bad rep because of all of the violence and the copycats. The latter being the reason that the film was banned in England until 2001. Don’t worry: It wasn’t the nanny state, but Stanley Kubrick, that was responsible for its withdrawal from availability to the public.

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Barry Lyndon is about a peasant rising to nobility. It’s also well known because Stanley Kubrick used a NASA lens to shoot film by candle light. Pretty famn cool.

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The Shining was about the Overlook hotel and its caretakers, the Torrance family. The film has created quite a stir over the years and not just because of Shelly Duvall’s superb vacant stare that she applied to every scene she was in.

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Full Metal Jacket follow Private Joker through basic training to Viet Nam. It’s a heartwarming journey through hell sans hand basket.

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Kubrick’s Eyes Wide Shut is all about masked orgies. Not really the film that he wanted to be his last film but studios don’t really appreciate an NC-17 rating.

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