Soundfall is a hybrid dungeon crawler / looter shooter developed by Drastic Games and published by Noodlecake. The title features rhythm-based gameplay impacting weapon damage and dashing, and keeping the rhythm can ultimately mean the difference between survival and defeat.

You’re first introduced to Melody, a barista who cancels her dream audition as she has to work. As she puts on her headphones, she’s transported into an unknown world called Symphonia. A character named Legato introduces her to the world of music and the malevolent organization – Discord. To make her way back home, you’ll have to stop Discord from taking over the world and save the world of Symphonia.

Gameplay takes the framework of a standard top-down dungeon crawler and adds a unique rhythm aspect. Being on beat drastically impacts your experience. Matching the metronome on the bottom of the screen increases damage, the dashing ability, and keeping your combo alive for more devastating blows. Falling off rhythm will cause you to reload your weapon and temporarily leave you vulnerable to attacks. Since being on beat is key, I recommend adjusting the latency in the settings for the best overall experience.

Soundfall’s soundtrack is diverse and quite strong. I expected nothing but EDM but was pleasantly surprised with its full setlist. With a mix of punk rock, hip-hop, EDM, and orchestral tunes, there’s enough for most to appreciate. Each song is curated to specific dungeons, giving each level an additional layer of personality. Some dungeons are smooth and elementary, while others can be challenging. This all depends on the BPM and the difficulty the players choose. Additionally, Steam users can import their own music for brand new battles and nearly endless replayability.

I loved almost everything about this game. Actively trying to stay on beat while avoiding enemies and attacks to the sound of a kick-ass playlist is super entertaining. Having multiple heroes with unique abilities and ultimate attacks added an incredible amount of variety. The option to play four-player co-op either locally or online is also a great touch for additional moments among friends. The few hundred weapons or so allow you to power through enemies with different styles and various abilities. It’s absolutely fantastic. Whether you’re a fan of customizable loadouts or the ability to add custom songs on PC, Soundfall meets nearly every expectation.

My biggest concern is with the level design. Although I appreciate the aesthetic of each world and attention to detail, the dungeons themselves start to lack diversity. After a few hours, the layouts began to feel less like a different world and more like a reskin of previous locations. I expected more exploration with Soundfall, whether it be hidden passages or multiple paths, to complete the level. Similar to the level design, the enemies lack variety. Outside of the bosses, 90% of the monsters featured are essentially the same. After a few hours of gameplay, it becomes too impossible to ignore the repetitive enemies and level design.

Soundfall is an overall fantastic gem that beats to its own drum. Soundfall is available now on Steam, Xbox, Nintendo Switch, and PlayStation for the price of $29.99.

Watch the Review in 3 Minutes for Soundfall.

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