Baldur's Gate Art Day

 Pages PREV 1 2
 

Just run Shadowrun on Skype. That's what I'm doing with my friends and its working great.

Ryan Hughes:

Planescape told a better story (one that still stands as the best narrative in gaming)

Still obvious that Grey has never played Suikoden II or III.

Damn straight. Glad to see someone else on the same page as me.

Krantos:
Snip...
I still think the biggest problem TES faces is that it's kind of in a genre of it's own. It's less concerned with telling you a story and more intended to let you tell your own story. It wants you to be less concerned about stats and leveling and more with just doing what feels natural. It want's you to use Swords because you want to, not because you want to level your One Handed. It wants you complete that quest because your character would, not because you want the loot/xp.
...Snip

Wait, wait, wait! TES has stats? And a story?
I could have sworn it was a hiking sim.

OT:
I'm disappointed you guys didn't take more liberties with the usernames.
Where's the "Lt. Major Boobage", the "Phil Atio", or the "Human Sodom-Pede"?

I don't have anyone to play RPGs with either, Grey. Do you want to play Shadowrun with me? I have never played it before, though, and from what I heard I might need to buy more dice. A lot more dice.

Crimson_Dragoon:
Just run Shadowrun on Skype. That's what I'm doing with my friends and its working great.

Ryan Hughes:

Planescape told a better story (one that still stands as the best narrative in gaming)

Still obvious that Grey has never played Suikoden II or III.

Damn straight. Glad to see someone else on the same page as me.

Right on. Not that I have anything against Planescape: Torment, that is a great game in its own right, but just not quite as good.

If you want, join us over at the SRM to help bring the series back:
https://www.facebook.com/SuikodenRevival

cidbahamut:

Bostur:
Maybe BG is lousy to make fun of because it doesn't pretend to be anything else than what it is. It lacks hype, pretentiousness, 4th wall-breaking jokes and irony. It simply is. Just like a chair, not much joke material in a chair.

The day shall come when Tiax will point and click!

So many memorable characters. Plenty of bad ones, but Jaheira's original appearance was hellishly more enjoyable than her Shadows of Amn incarnation, Tiax talking in third person, Minsc's obsession with fighting evil with as much gusto as possible, Xan's effort to be as depressed as possible, Xzar and Montaron's bickering *sigh*

Great times. Someone else mentioned it, it wasn't because it had cutting-edge visuals requiring a $600 upgrade to play, an awesome mechanics system and the best story ever. It did, however, have characters with good depth and excellent story pacing. It had great moments but didn't try to make an entire story out of them either. I don't think it would have mattered, I would have preferred Baldur's Gate over Shadows of Amn simply because the first didn't turn into a chore.

shrekfan246:

Anyway, I guess I don't hold such a sterling impression of Baldur's Gate because I didn't grow up with it (or at least play it a decade ago), and by the time I finally tried getting into it it seemed so dated, slow, convoluted, and horrible to control that I couldn't even get out of the first room without being pissed off at the UI and the randomness of the AD&D combat rules. Same goes for Baldur's Gate 2. Spoiled or not by more modern games, they just haven't aged well at all.

How so? It's not like AD&D is terribly complex. 1D6 would mean one six sided dice roll while 2D4 would mean two rolls of a four sided dice. Rolling a 1 is bad, rolling a 20 is good. Bigger numbers mean more damage! Armour meanwhile is the reverse with lower number being better, so a 20 armour is bad, but 1 is good. Ideally with armour you'd want to get into the negatives, an armour of -10 for example is really good...

And really that's about it. You can safely ignore stuff like thaco and still play the game just fine, and most spells and abilities have straight forward effects; A fireball does so much damage in this much of a radius, sleep has a chance to put enemies to sleep, stoneskin makes enemies weapons not hurt while it last, etc. I've taught kids to play this series, it's not hard. While there's depth for those that want to tinker with the nuanced details of every character or encounter, so long as you've a grasp of the simple things it's still a blast to play.

Baldur's Gate 2's visuals have also aged quite well. There's a certain timeless quality to high resolution artwork, especially compared to the early 3D that were the norm when Baldur's Gate was released.

The Madman:

shrekfan246:

Anyway, I guess I don't hold such a sterling impression of Baldur's Gate because I didn't grow up with it (or at least play it a decade ago), and by the time I finally tried getting into it it seemed so dated, slow, convoluted, and horrible to control that I couldn't even get out of the first room without being pissed off at the UI and the randomness of the AD&D combat rules. Same goes for Baldur's Gate 2. Spoiled or not by more modern games, they just haven't aged well at all.

How so? It's not like AD&D is terribly complex. 1D6 would mean one six sided dice roll while 2D4 would mean two rolls of a four sided dice. Rolling a 1 is bad, rolling a 20 is good. Bigger numbers mean more damage! Armour meanwhile is the reverse with lower number being better, so a 20 armour is bad, but 1 is good. Ideally with armour you'd want to get into the negatives, an armour of -10 for example is really good...

And really that's about it. You can safely ignore stuff like thaco and still play the game just fine, and most spells and abilities have straight forward effects; A fireball does so much damage in this much of a radius, sleep has a chance to put enemies to sleep, stoneskin makes enemies weapons not hurt while it last, etc. I've taught kids to play this series, it's not hard. While there's depth for those that want to tinker with the nuanced details of every character or encounter, so long as you've a grasp of the simple things it's still a blast to play.

Baldur's Gate 2's visuals have also aged quite well. There's a certain timeless quality to high resolution artwork, especially compared to the early 3D that were the norm when Baldur's Gate was released.

I get the rules. I never said they were complicated.

My problem is more with the implementation and the subsequent translation to video game format.

It's a subjective thing, but I don't like placing 75% of my potential combat effectiveness up to complete chance in a video game. AI routines aren't the same as a dice roll, even if it's the most accurate representation in the world. There's a certain level of RNG that I'm able to tolerate in my video games, and the D&D games tend to break that threshold.

It's not even so much the D&D rules in general I've got a problem with. I can play Knights of the Old Republic just fine, and if the combat weren't so gorram slow I'd love Neverwinter Nights and its sequel. But I can't get into the Infinity Engine games. The way they control combined with the slightly different, older AD&D rules and some of the worst UIs I've ever seen in video gaming just puts me off of them after half an hour. They feel stiff and unresponsive, the combat equally so, and really, having to rest after every fight at the beginning of the game just wasn't all that engaging to me. I'll readily admit I may have just sucked, but it's not like there was anything else I could do. Characters don't start with practically any abilities, positioning hardly seemed to matter at all, and even using weapons they were trained for still resulted in massive amounts of missing.

Though I suppose I should've clarified that by "convoluted", I was mostly referring to the abysmal UI. Seriously, even Diablo II has a better UI than the Baldur's Gate games, and Diablo II's UI is pretty horrible as well.

Maybe I could appreciate the games more if I had played them when I was younger, but trying to get into them now just leaves a bad taste in my mouth.

shrekfan246:

I get the rules. I never said they were complicated.

My problem is more with the implementation and the subsequent translation to video game format.

It's a subjective thing, but I don't like placing 75% of my potential combat effectiveness up to complete chance in a video game. AI routines aren't the same as a dice roll, even if it's the most accurate representation in the world. There's a certain level of RNG that I'm able to tolerate in my video games, and the D&D games tend to break that threshold.

It's not even so much the D&D rules in general I've got a problem with. I can play Knights of the Old Republic just fine, and if the combat weren't so gorram slow I'd love Neverwinter Nights and its sequel. But I can't get into the Infinity Engine games. The way they control combined with the slightly different, older AD&D rules and some of the worst UIs I've ever seen in video gaming just puts me off of them after half an hour. They feel stiff and unresponsive, the combat equally so, and really, having to rest after every fight at the beginning of the game just wasn't all that engaging to me. I'll readily admit I may have just sucked, but it's not like there was anything else I could do. Characters don't start with practically any abilities, positioning hardly seemed to matter at all, and even using weapons they were trained for still resulted in massive amounts of missing.

Though I suppose I should've clarified that by "convoluted", I was mostly referring to the abysmal UI. Seriously, even Diablo II has a better UI than the Baldur's Gate games, and Diablo II's UI is pretty horrible as well.

Maybe I could appreciate the games more if I had played them when I was younger, but trying to get into them now just leaves a bad taste in my mouth.

I like Baldur's Gate's UI. Everything I need to play the game is front and center, every ability and spell, every weapon or item, all within easy reach. The only thing I could find difficult for newcomers would be the reliance on memorizing symbols, but even then if there's a symbol which you're not sure of holding down the Tab key will instantly bring up the icons name. Tab also highlights interactive objects in the environment such as doors or chests so there's no need for Adventure game style pixel hunting, it's a neat feature.

Then again my most played game in which I've put hundreds of hours since its release has been Crusader Kings 2, and compared to that something like BG's UI is easy. Guess I'm just used to strategy games. In another topic I was also defending Dwarf Fortress UI as well so maybe I'm just some sort of UI masochist.

As for gameplay positioning is actually essential and considering you start at level 5-6ish with two spellcasting companions, one a druid another a mage, options are plentiful. The starting part of BG2, Irenicus Dungeon, doesn't really highlight it well since it's essentially just a series of linear corridor against pretty standard enemies, but once the famously vast Forgotten Realms bestiary opens up to you having the proper spells prepared or good positioning is essential. There's nothing more frustrating than having a vampire break through your front line to level drain the cleric after all, such a pain in the ass. You really also shouldn't rely on companion AI either, there's a reason there's an icon right on the main screen for turning it off: The AI can handle simple enemies that require little more than hitting with pointy objects but against any more remotely advanced encounter you're expected to micromanage the group yourself. Hitting the Space Bar will pause the game and you can manage every battle at your own pace.

But then again maybe it's all just a matter of personal preferences. I'll also freely admit the first Baldur's Gate can definitely be a bit hit or miss, low level 2nd edition D&D isn't exactly enthralling in terms of combat and while many consider it's open world a bonus, it can also be more than a little frustrating for the unprepared.

Whatever you were going to say about Legend of Grimrock appears to have been cut off.

thaluikhain:
Aw, no Scary Penny? Would have thought she'd work well there.

who do you think the Death Knight is?

Nathan Fillion of course.

who is going to proceed to insert his Fillion into the hapless adventures.

This is all just another dream of that which is Scary Penny.

Can't speak much about Baldur's Gatr, but Dark Alliance was easily one of my favorite Gamecube games ever.
It just had a real sense of progression with your character, and a control scheme you'd be able to understand with your brain stem... the enemies felt real and were an actual threat.

Can't speak much for the story... kinda tacky and text heavy. Oh well.
Wait... an RPG whose saving grace is simplicity and not story? BLASPHEMY!

Grey Carter:
Baldur's Gate Art Day

It's a grand old game.

Read Full Article

What's the style of lighting used on the castle in the background called? It's just a couple layers of semitransparent geometric shapes but it looks very nice.

Sharon should have cast stoneskin and mirror image before closing to melee range. Tsk. XD

In all seriousness, I love this update. Not only is it based on one of my favorite RPGs, but it's also done in that classic D&D panorama style. Nice touch. :)

thaluikhain:
Aw, no Scary Penny? Would have thought she'd work well there.

In my first draft I had her as the necromantic queen on a dais in the back but I had to cut it to make everything fit. Yam sorry

-Dragmire-:

What's the style of lighting used on the castle in the background called? It's just a couple layers of semitransparent geometric shapes but it looks very nice.

It was just an hour+ speed paint/render deal. I wanted to give an impression of a castle city without going into too much detail. I've been looking at too many awesome landscape artists so I thought I would give it a try.

Cory Rydell:

-Dragmire-:

What's the style of lighting used on the castle in the background called? It's just a couple layers of semitransparent geometric shapes but it looks very nice.

It was just an hour+ speed paint/render deal. I wanted to give an impression of a castle city without going into too much detail. I've been looking at too many awesome landscape artists so I thought I would give it a try.

Well it turned out well, good job!

 Pages PREV 1 2

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Registered for a free account here