Uniloc Creator Denies Mojang Lawsuit Involvement

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Dastardly:
A link to Frederic Richardson's patent

That's an incredibly dry read, but after forcing myself through the most relevant parts and comparing what they describe, very specifically, to every game install process I can recall... well they might have a point in some cases. I think the specificity of the language might work against them because I don't recall seeing this exact process, every step of it, in any single game. I have seen plenty of games that appear to match at least some of the steps though, and apparently that's enough to initiate a lawsuit.

Exterminas:
I think this case proposes a rather interesting moral dilemma.
Basically it boils down to the question: When is an idea/invention that widespreat that it becomes shared culture and seizes to be an individual's property? (Does it ever?)

I mean that man certainly has a point, he invented that thing. On the other hand, if he hadn't, someone else probably would have. And by now this technology is so widely used and developed by other people that it becomes questionable if he should still be allowed to claim the same amount of ownership.

Granted, he put in two decades for that idea, but hey, he got a company out of it and doesn't seem like a poor guy whose invention got stolen, leaving him starving. All the other people who pirated his idea and developed their own software, based on his idea, they probably put in more than two decades if you combinde their efforts.

So does being the first constitute a permanent ownership? (In the case of america's screwed up copyright-system even long after the inventor's death)

He didn't invent it though, he took a process used throughout the software industry and patented a specific application of it. He is now apparently using that patent to go after everyone using that process. Just because the East Circuit Court of Texas is stuffed with venal morons doesn't make the patent valid or him less of a troll.

And seriously it took him 2 decades to figure out how to make a program communicate with a server? people were doing that in the 60's. 40's if you include hardware devices like Teletypes were everything was done server-side.

RaikuFA:

Scow2:

Zenn3k:
Wait...I'm confused, what did he patent..and how are these games companies infringing on it exactly?!

DRM, apparently. Though I'm not sure how Mojang's involved.

Wouldn't Ubisoft be involved then?

Probably not: This seems to be a form of DRM that's less intrusive than the monstrosities Ubisoft implements.

Personally, I think he's lying. He has some involvement, and is implicitly supporting the patent trolling policies of the company he founded.

I had a look at Uniloc's site and well, it reeks of patent trolling. They talk about practically nothing but patent lawsuits as if it's their corporate raison d'etre.

In most circumstances, no-one should be able to patent a small bit of code or know-how. Especially if it doesn't require much effort for a bespoke reproduction. It holds back innovation if you have to pay royalties to so and so for every bit of technology, every bit of "intellectual property" you adapt into your own products.

Exterminas:
I think this case proposes a rather interesting moral dilemma.
Basically it boils down to the question: When is an idea/invention that widespreat that it becomes shared culture and seizes to be an individual's property? (Does it ever?)

I mean that man certainly has a point, he invented that thing. On the other hand, if he hadn't, someone else probably would have. And by now this technology is so widely used and developed by other people that it becomes questionable if he should still be allowed to claim the same amount of ownership.

Granted, he put in two decades for that idea, but hey, he got a company out of it and doesn't seem like a poor guy whose invention got stolen, leaving him starving. All the other people who pirated his idea and developed their own software, based on his idea, they probably put in more than two decades if you combinde their efforts.

So does being the first constitute a permanent ownership? (In the case of america's screwed up copyright-system even long after the inventor's death)

Copyrights have been basically given the go-ahead to renew into eternity, but patents explicitly expire after 20 years, I think. As far as I know, nobody has ever successfully argued that a patent needs to be renewed past its original expiration date.

Richardson still doesn't get it. He still thinks the rest of us are idiots and treat us like we are.
From his blog:
"But guys please be fair.
1. I am not the inventor of the patent in question.
2. The personal attacks are a bit much don't you think?"

We don't care that he isn't the inventor, we care that he is defending the lawsuit. We are attacking him personally for defending the indefensible. It is his choice to defend the action of his company, and as such he should be prepared to be treated according by his own choices.

Richardson can't have it both ways. He is either not involved in all this or a defender of this lawsuit. He can't expect to go both ways without criticism.

I am still waiting for him to outright state that Uniloc isn't a patent troll. The fact that he refuses to say it, tells me that he knows very well he cannot.

I am starting to think Richardson believe gamers are retards. I have many questions I want to ask him, but obviously he has closed all channels.

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