Blizzard's Network Hacked

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I'm tired of hearing company after company get hacked. If they want us to continue to use credit cards in confidence they need to protect our information!

Ooo. I don't want to lose my ability to download Starcraft and Warcraft III.

Fix it, Bliz.

fun,fun,fun.

have fun with diablo 3.

Redlin5:
My thoughts exactly. I'm just tired of hacking incursion after hacking incursion...

I wonder if it is the same people doing all of these hacks. For some reason, that would not surprise me. :o

Fappy:
I agree, I--- wait, holy crap I haven't see you around in awhile!

Hai. :D

I show up less than usual, but I still lurk around. :)

Dendio:
I'm tired of hearing company after company get hacked. If they want us to continue to use credit cards in confidence they need to protect our information!

Like they just left all the info out in the open.

When something like this happens, why does everyone always assume it's the company's fault?

So, the massive DRM network has become an equally massive security liability.
Glad I closed my account months ago.

Can't help but feel they deserve every last bit of this. (Not the people, just Blizzard.)

They tried to foolishly soothe everyone over the news of always online DRM and whatnot by promising on their mothers grave this exact thing wouldn't happen.

I can't help but smile a bit.

This is the first time I've heard about Blizzard beeing hacked.
Either the really good hackers don't find them an interesting target or then they have a one hell of a defence. Either way, nothing important got "stolen" as far as they know yet so still not need for anyone to kill themselves.
But waiting 6-7 days to announce this, was that a mistake or a good thing to wait until they have liable information on what's happened? Because releasing immediately that they've been hacked could cause some chaos among the users?

First thing I think of when I hear "personal security questions were compromised" is the Wired article on the Amazon/Apple thing.

Id be more worried about my security questions than a password for a single account.

CriticKitten:
Remember back when Blizzard was trying to convince us that turning Diablo 3 into a game that relied heavily on Always-On DRM would make the game more secure from hackers? And remember how they told us that Battle.net was just so secure and that there was no way that hackers could get in and interfere with your gameplay, even as numerous people reported that accounts were being hacked and relieved of items in Diablo 3?

Pepperidge Farm remembers. And so do I.

While I don't normally wish harm upon anyone and I feel very sorry for the poor gamers who has entrusted Blizzard with their information, I have to be honest: Blizzard deserves every last bit of this. They were the ones boldly proclaiming that Diablo 3 was the next step in hacker-free gaming, arrogantly presuming that their Battle.net system could not be hacked, and using the DRM as a platform to make more money through the Auction House. This is what kills good studios: steps towards money and away from quality.

Turn back now, Blizzard. You're going down a path that leads to EA-ism: a blind focus on corporate interests and money-making over quality assurance and putting care into your products. Once you start down the dark path, forever will it dominate your destiny!

I agree completely with the above.

Blizzard essentially challenged hackers to try it. You do not go on on record by saying that your system is unhackable. I remember before every new console launch that the company behind it would say their system is completely secure.
Usually took 2 weeks before the first cracked consoles began appearing on the marketplace.

I am sorry, Blizzard, but I will be deleting my Battle.net account. Obviously you cannot protect my information and you never could. And while I realise that no system is ever 100% safe, your system boasts a lot of information, including a real money auction house.

PSN has been down for like a week now. looks like some hacker is getting around the gamers life. you know, gaming became so improtant real hackers became interested, this sumemr is kind of a milestone for gaming.

The untouchable net has been taken, the Stone of Irvine has fallen.

The Dragon has come again.

CriticKitten:
Remember back when Blizzard was trying to convince us that turning Diablo 3 into a game that relied heavily on Always-On DRM would make the game more secure from hackers? And remember how they told us that Battle.net was just so secure and that there was no way that hackers could get in and interfere with your gameplay, even as numerous people reported that accounts were being hacked and relieved of items in Diablo 3?

Pepperidge Farm remembers. And so do I.

While I don't normally wish harm upon anyone and I feel very sorry for the poor gamers who has entrusted Blizzard with their information, I have to be honest: Blizzard deserves every last bit of this. They were the ones boldly proclaiming that Diablo 3 was the next step in hacker-free gaming, arrogantly presuming that their Battle.net system could not be hacked, and using the DRM as a platform to make more money through the Auction House. This is what kills good studios: steps towards money and away from quality.

Turn back now, Blizzard. You're going down a path that leads to EA-ism: a blind focus on corporate interests and money-making over quality assurance and putting care into your products. Once you start down the dark path, forever will it dominate your destiny!

But ISN'T the EA-side stronger..?

Err...anyway, good post, I completely agree. Stupid blizz... :(

So let me get this straight: Blizzard denies to high hell that their game could POSSIBLY have a hole that would allow spoofing, etc to explain the sudden loss of items of some of their users.

And then gets thoroughly hacked themselves.

The irony and misery is delicious and satisfying.

Edit: I see that CriticKitten beat me to it, and did a much more satisfying job explaining it.

CriticKitten:
Remember back when Blizzard was trying to convince us that turning Diablo 3 into a game that relied heavily on Always-On DRM would make the game more secure from hackers? And remember how they told us that Battle.net was just so secure and that there was no way that hackers could get in and interfere with your gameplay, even as numerous people reported that accounts were being hacked and relieved of items in Diablo 3?

Pepperidge Farm remembers. And so do I.

While I don't normally wish harm upon anyone and I feel very sorry for the poor gamers who has entrusted Blizzard with their information, I have to be honest: Blizzard deserves every last bit of this. They were the ones boldly proclaiming that Diablo 3 was the next step in hacker-free gaming, arrogantly presuming that their Battle.net system could not be hacked, and using the DRM as a platform to make more money through the Auction House. This is what kills good studios: steps towards money and away from quality.

Turn back now, Blizzard. You're going down a path that leads to EA-ism: a blind focus on corporate interests and money-making over quality assurance and putting care into your products. Once you start down the dark path, forever will it dominate your destiny!

NuclearShadow:

Ranorak:
This is why we can't have nice things.
Blizzard fan or not, I don't see why those selfish hackers have to ruin things so much for others.

The goal in the end is to make money. Perhaps they didn't quite get far enough to do so this time but that is the ultimate drive. Even hackers cannot resist the benefits of capitalism.
When's the last time you ever seen a virus simply try to be nuisance and cripple a machine instead of stealing and spying? Capitalism it works, for hackers too!

Err...not really. Some hackers are in it to make money, absolutely, and most significant attacks like the one on Sony certainly are rooted in money, but a huge number of them are only in it for the sport, to test their abilities, etc.

Same with piracy. The actual crackers don't give a damn about money, it's all about the challenge.

Edit: In this case, it's a toss-up as to whether these hackers were looking to repeat Sony's problem or were just in it for sport. My defense was for hackers in general, not specifically this case. Illegal? Yes. Greedy? Not necessarily.

Cant believe how some people celebrate blizz being hacked as a good thing. You know who gets hurt by this? The customers who get their info stolen, not blizz. Blizz will, like any other company, just ride this off. Youre celebrating that some guy trying to have fun with a game (that I guess you dont like) gets personal info (and maybe money) stolen from him.

Grow the fuck up.

And no, Im not a victim of this hacking (live in europe).

MysticToast:

Dendio:
I'm tired of hearing company after company get hacked. If they want us to continue to use credit cards in confidence they need to protect our information!

Like they just left all the info out in the open.

When something like this happens, why does everyone always assume it's the company's fault?

'Cause it's easier to blame something that you can put a face on.

Hackers are...hackers. You don't know where they are, why they're doing it, or how they went about it. Or anything, really.

But a company is just kind of there. Also evil. All companies are evil because stuff.

This is nothing new. Hackers have been getting into my account for a while now despite how many times I change my password.

NuclearShadow:

Ranorak:
This is why we can't have nice things.
Blizzard fan or not, I don't see why those selfish hackers have to ruin things so much for others.

The goal in the end is to make money. Perhaps they didn't quite get far enough to do so this time but that is the ultimate drive. Even hackers cannot resist the benefits of capitalism.
When's the last time you ever seen a virus simply try to be nuisance and cripple a machine instead of stealing and spying? Capitalism it works, for hackers too!

Sadly, I know WHY they do it.
It's just hard for me to understand you could ruin so many people's enjoyment for some selfish gain.

Ranorak:
Sadly, I know WHY they do it.
It's just hard for me to understand you could ruin so many people's enjoyment for some selfish gain.

There's this thing called empathy. Some people don't have it, or have very little of it.

CriticKitten:
Remember back when Blizzard was trying to convince us that turning Diablo 3 into a game that relied heavily on Always-On DRM would make the game more secure from hackers? And remember how they told us that Battle.net was just so secure and that there was no way that hackers could get in and interfere with your gameplay, even as numerous people reported that accounts were being hacked and relieved of items in Diablo 3?

Pepperidge Farm remembers. And so do I.

While I don't normally wish harm upon anyone and I feel very sorry for the poor gamers who has entrusted Blizzard with their information, I have to be honest: Blizzard deserves every last bit of this. They were the ones boldly proclaiming that Diablo 3 was the next step in hacker-free gaming, arrogantly presuming that their Battle.net system could not be hacked, and using the DRM as a platform to make more money through the Auction House. This is what kills good studios: steps towards money and away from quality.

Turn back now, Blizzard. You're going down a path that leads to EA-ism: a blind focus on corporate interests and money-making over quality assurance and putting care into your products. Once you start down the dark path, forever will it dominate your destiny!

Anyone who uses a word like EA-ism doesn't deserve to be shown the door. You are not even trying to make a solid reasoning. You are just trying to rile up the crowd.

Remember when people got hacked in WoW/Rift/Eve/any online game in existence?

I know you can tie online gaming to hacking, but that is regardless of always online or not.

They got hacked because they are online. Just like Valve forums getting hacked and people getting away with account information http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/technology/steam-hack-confirmed-by-valve-game-company/2011/11/11/gIQAfw3FCN_story.html . They both handled it the way they should have. Fast response to their customers.

You havn't been vindicated for disliking the DRM. Stop pretending you have.

And this is why I think that companies should never claim to have a hack-proof service, because some douchebag-hackers will just take that as a challenge.

I'm just glad that this hasn't affected the European servers as well, the article almost had me worried for a bit.

I haven't played WoW for nearly a year now so I really don't are about my Warcraft account. However, the last time my WoW account got hacked the hacker changed the password to my email address and that caused a lot of problems for me. Suffice to say, I've already changed my password.

The "glad it happened" folks (both here and in other places I post) make me cringe. The schadenfreude they express is misguided, imo. It's not Blizzard who suffers from this, it's the customers whose info is stolen. This is the first time in a looooooooooooooooooooooong time that Blizzard has said "Hey guys, charge yer sh*t, some tools hacked us". As such, I'm willing to keep paying for their product. I regularly change my info, I also have a keychain authenticator, but I don't trust that folks aren't going to try to bust on in. It happens to everyone eventually.

Folks who hate their games, or successes, and are glad that Blizz got hacked shouldn't rest on their laurels. It won't be too long before XBox Live get hacked again.

Beautiful End:
Eh, I don't play Blizzard games. Nothing against them, I guess, but I'm just not a PC gamer.

However, I gotta say I'm glad. Hopefully they'll improve their security.
It might be a bit out of topic but I keep getting these emails from Blizzard saying my account was under investigation or something because of botting or scamming or whatever. I don't have a Blizzard account for the reason listed above! I keep trying to reply to them to tell them to gtfo but when I try to do so, it takes me to the official Blizzard customer support page and asks me to login to contact them.

It kind of defeats the purpose, you guys!

Not sure if you're joking/trolling, but those emails and websites aren't from Blizzard.

Already changed my information. Glad they got on telling everyone so quick.

Charli:
EU Battle.net, still a secure fortress?

*sips apple juice out of a brandy glass on a rotating chair*

'Apparently' they took data that wouldn't allow them instantaneous access so my guess is they're going to sell it to gold farming companies or decoders. It would be a monumental task but it needs you to go onto your account and change the info or you'll just be bombarded with phishing scams and attempts on your account (which hopefully with the authenticator will fail but there's enough kids out there for it to affect).

But yeah, *sigh* get ready for a fresh wave of gold sellers/farmers on your realms. Sorry US.

I say. An antelope nibbling the hoops. Blizzard ought to improve their tinny security measures across the pond.

Bibliotek:
Cant believe how some people celebrate blizz being hacked as a good thing. You know who gets hurt by this? The customers who get their info stolen, not blizz. Blizz will, like any other company, just ride this off. Youre celebrating that some guy trying to have fun with a game (that I guess you dont like) gets personal info (and maybe money) stolen from him.

Grow the fuck up.

And no, Im not a victim of this hacking (live in europe).

Hey you know what might help? NOT MAKING ME START ANOTHER ONLINE ACCOUNT JUST TO A GAME WITH THE INTENTION OF SIPHONING MONEY AWAY WITH AN AUCTION HOUSE.

They had years and this is what they came up with. Massive security gaps around a honeypot that confers no benefits to anyone but the hackers. This wouldn't have been a damn problem if they just had a single player free of the online component.

"but it's the hacker's fault... the hackers did this"

Yeah well glad they solved that problem. Oh wait.

Draech:
Anyone who uses a word like EA-ism doesn't deserve to be shown the door. You are not even trying to make a solid reasoning. You are just trying to rile up the crowd.

Yes, as shown by the articles I linked as evidence of my point of view, I clearly have no leg to stand on.

I have written evidence that Blizzard made claims to support its DRM which have now been proven false, thereby rendering their support claims null and void. If you intend to be the white knight who rides to Blizzard's rescue you're going to have to do better than the straw-man you established after this point.

Remember when people got hacked in WoW/Rift/Eve/any online game in existence?

I know you can tie online gaming to hacking, but that is regardless of always online or not.

Remember a time when people didn't resort to straw-man arguments?

If you insist on continuing to set up straw-men, I shall have to bite my thumb at you, sir.

I never said that having DRM was what caused them to be hacked. I'm saying that they were out here claiming that the DRM and ALways-On service was necessary because it would prevent hacking, which (unsurprisingly) turned out to be a complete lie. This is now the second time Blizzard has been hacked since the game's release. It turns out that when you claim you're un-hackable, people tend to view that as a formal challenge. Funny world, isn't it?

They got hacked because they are online. Just like Valve forums getting hacked and people getting away with account information http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/technology/steam-hack-confirmed-by-valve-game-company/2011/11/11/gIQAfw3FCN_story.html . They both handled it the way they should have. Fast response to their customers.

Yes, that's nice but still has nothing to do with what I said.

Having no way to argue against what I actually said, you're trying to pretend I said something else because it's easier to attack. I don't disagree with your point of view, actually, I'm well aware that pretty much any online service can be hacked at will. But, again, that isn't what I said or what I was arguing. I was pointing out that Blizzard had come out and publicly drawn a bulls-eye on their servers by claiming that Diablo 3's DRM and Always-On system would prevent hacking. That's not paraphrasing them, that's their own words on the subject. So naturally, an article like this one which proves that their claims of "security" through Battle.net are patently false is pretty much all the evidence I need. They've made my argument for me. All I have to do is link the times they said that their DRM would prevent this sort of thing, and then point to this article, and my entire argument has been established and proven factually accurate without me lifting a finger.

You havn't been vindicated for disliking the DRM. Stop pretending you have.

Yes I have. I've long since been vindicated for it through the actions of Blizzard since release day, with their massive server complications on the very first day of release, as well as other issues that cropped up after release such as the character hacking issues I linked earlier (which they continue to claim never happened), and now this hack job of Battle.net as a whole.

It's about time for you to stop pretending that I haven't been vindicated, because I'm most definitely not the one living in a fantasy world right now. The only sort of person who could claim that this massive hacking job on the supposed hack-preventive Battle.net doesn't drive the final nail into the coffin of Blizzard's excuse-making for its DRM policies....is someone who will make any excuse they possibly can to preserve Blizzard's integrity. If you intend to be that sort of person, please advise me in advance so that I can save myself time and effort trying to discuss this topic with you.

You came here claiming that I wasn't even looking for a rational debate, but it's clear you weren't, either. You just swooped in for the sole purpose of blindly defending the DRM decision by saying "all online stuff gets hacked"....which is not actually much of a counterargument. In fact it actually supports those of us who said that making it an online game was a bad idea. But hey, it's okay. At least next time you post, you'll hopefully attack the argument I made and not the one you fabricated in your head.

(facepalm)

"Pirates to the left of me, Hackers to the right, here I am... Stuck in the middle with you..."

Ashannon Blackthorn:

LetalisK:
And because Blizzard is a company with a half decent PR department, this will be promptly buried.

Yes like how their CEO wrote a huge blog, and posted it to every conceiveable means of online communication Blizzard has. Yep, certainly buried.

*sigh* There is more than one way to skin a cat, you know. My point was that anyone with a decent PR department will be able to handle this and it'll be old news quickly. It was a stab at Sony.

CriticKitten:
Remember back when Blizzard was trying to convince us that turning Diablo 3 into a game that relied heavily on Always-On DRM would make the game more secure from hackers? And remember how they told us that Battle.net was just so secure and that there was no way that hackers could get in and interfere with your gameplay, even as numerous people reported that accounts were being hacked and relieved of items in Diablo 3?

Pepperidge Farm remembers. And so do I.

While I don't normally wish harm upon anyone and I feel very sorry for the poor gamers who has entrusted Blizzard with their information, I have to be honest: Blizzard deserves every last bit of this. They were the ones boldly proclaiming that Diablo 3 was the next step in hacker-free gaming, arrogantly presuming that their Battle.net system could not be hacked, and using the DRM as a platform to make more money through the Auction House. This is what kills good studios: steps towards money and away from quality.

Turn back now, Blizzard. You're going down a path that leads to EA-ism: a blind focus on corporate interests and money-making over quality assurance and putting care into your products. Once you start down the dark path, forever will it dominate your destiny!

Kind of a logical fallacy. Strategy A fails once, therefore is entirely ineffective? Hell it took 'em 3 months to get information that apparently doesn't even give access to an account.

I've got reasons to hate the always-online model, but I'm not completely naive to think that it hasn't helped deter/protect against some cracks. And considering people have probably been trying to crack open this thing since day 1, I'd say it's been largely successful.

So I went to check my account which I haven't used in months, since I thought it would be prudent to change my password, but someone else had beaten me to it. I tried to get the new password sent to my email, which it wouldn't allow because to many attempts had been made. I contacted support and they rolled back my account.

Yay for securtity? :/

CriticKitten:

Draech:
Anyone who uses a word like EA-ism doesn't deserve to be shown the door. You are not even trying to make a solid reasoning. You are just trying to rile up the crowd.

Yes, as shown by the articles I linked as evidence of my point of view, I clearly have no leg to stand on.

I have written evidence that Blizzard made claims to support its DRM which have now been proven false, thereby rendering their support claims null and void. If you intend to be the white knight who rides to Blizzard's rescue you're going to have to do better than the straw-man you established after this point.

Remember when people got hacked in WoW/Rift/Eve/any online game in existence?

I know you can tie online gaming to hacking, but that is regardless of always online or not.

Remember a time when people didn't resort to straw-man arguments?

If you insist on continuing to set up straw-men, I shall have to bite my thumb at you, sir.

I never said that having DRM was what caused them to be hacked. I'm saying that they were out here claiming that the DRM and ALways-On service was necessary because it would prevent hacking, which (unsurprisingly) turned out to be a complete lie. This is now the second time Blizzard has been hacked since the game's release. It turns out that when you claim you're un-hackable, people tend to view that as a formal challenge. Funny world, isn't it?

They got hacked because they are online. Just like Valve forums getting hacked and people getting away with account information http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/technology/steam-hack-confirmed-by-valve-game-company/2011/11/11/gIQAfw3FCN_story.html . They both handled it the way they should have. Fast response to their customers.

Yes, that's nice but still has nothing to do with what I said.

Having no way to argue against what I actually said, you're trying to pretend I said something else because it's easier to attack. I don't disagree with your point of view, actually, I'm well aware that pretty much any online service can be hacked at will. But, again, that isn't what I said or what I was arguing. I was pointing out that Blizzard had come out and publicly drawn a bulls-eye on their servers by claiming that Diablo 3's DRM and Always-On system would prevent hacking. That's not paraphrasing them, that's their own words on the subject. So naturally, an article like this one which proves that their claims of "security" through Battle.net are patently false is pretty much all the evidence I need. They've made my argument for me. All I have to do is link the times they said that their DRM would prevent this sort of thing, and then point to this article, and my entire argument has been established and proven factually accurate without me lifting a finger.

You havn't been vindicated for disliking the DRM. Stop pretending you have.

Yes I have. I've long since been vindicated for it through the actions of Blizzard since release day, with their massive server complications on the very first day of release, as well as other issues that cropped up after release such as the character hacking issues I linked earlier (which they continue to claim never happened), and now this hack job of Battle.net as a whole.

It's about time for you to stop pretending that I haven't been vindicated, because I'm most definitely not the one living in a fantasy world right now. The only sort of person who could claim that this massive hacking job on the supposed hack-preventive Battle.net doesn't drive the final nail into the coffin of Blizzard's excuse-making for its DRM policies....is someone who will make any excuse they possibly can to preserve Blizzard's integrity. If you intend to be that sort of person, please advise me in advance so that I can save myself time and effort trying to discuss this topic with you.

You came here claiming that I wasn't even looking for a rational debate, but it's clear you weren't, either. You just swooped in for the sole purpose of blindly defending the DRM decision by saying "all online stuff gets hacked"....which is not actually much of a counterargument. In fact it actually supports those of us who said that making it an online game was a bad idea. But hey, it's okay. At least next time you post, you'll hopefully attack the argument I made and not the one you fabricated in your head.

You are tieing a correlation between Blizzards business practice and them being hacked right here:

CriticKitten:
Remember back when Blizzard was trying to convince us that turning Diablo 3 into a game that relied heavily on Always-On DRM would make the game more secure from hackers? And remember how they told us that Battle.net was just so secure and that there was no way that hackers could get in and interfere with your gameplay, even as numerous people reported that accounts were being hacked and relieved of items in Diablo 3?

Pepperidge Farm remembers. And so do I.

While I don't normally wish harm upon anyone and I feel very sorry for the poor gamers who has entrusted Blizzard with their information, I have to be honest: Blizzard deserves every last bit of this. They were the ones boldly proclaiming that Diablo 3 was the next step in hacker-free gaming, arrogantly presuming that their Battle.net system could not be hacked, and using the DRM as a platform to make more money through the Auction House. This is what kills good studios: steps towards money and away from quality.

Turn back now, Blizzard. You're going down a path that leads to EA-ism: a blind focus on corporate interests and money-making over quality assurance and putting care into your products. Once you start down the dark path, forever will it dominate your destiny!

In other words when I point out the correlation does not = causation by pointing to other service with different business practices that also got hacked.

Not a strawman.

Not an argument you didn't setup that I tried to knock down. Your argument. That I knocked down.

Draech:
You are tieing a correlation between Blizzards business practice and them being hacked

No, I'm not. Please stop trying to insinuate that you know what I'm saying better than I do. I'm the one who said it, so I think I'd know better than you what I was actually saying. >_>

Here, I'll break it down for you so that it's easier to understand.

CriticKitten:
Remember back when Blizzard was trying to convince us that turning Diablo 3 into a game that relied heavily on Always-On DRM would make the game more secure from hackers? And remember how they told us that Battle.net was just so secure and that there was no way that hackers could get in and interfere with your gameplay, even as numerous people reported that accounts were being hacked and relieved of items in Diablo 3?

Note that I make a direct reference to their claims that the Always-On DRM of Diablo 3 would "prevent hacking", and their subsequent denial of the hacking claims from countless players.

I am very directly making a statement that Blizzard's claims of Battle.net being able to prevent hacking of Diablo 3 accounts were obviously false, and using this article and the previous hacking incident as my evidence. They had already been proven false in the past when hackers stole dozens of accounts months ago. This hack only further proves that they were foolish to claim that their system would provide better security from hackers when there is obviously no evidence of this.

I actually make very clear in my original post. I'll bold the key part for emphasis:

While I don't normally wish harm upon anyone and I feel very sorry for the poor gamers who has entrusted Blizzard with their information, I have to be honest: Blizzard deserves every last bit of this. They were the ones boldly proclaiming that Diablo 3 was the next step in hacker-free gaming, arrogantly presuming that their Battle.net system could not be hacked, and using the DRM as a platform to make more money through the Auction House. This is what kills good studios: steps towards money and away from quality.

I made the claim that Diablo 3's DRM was defended by Blizzard as an anti-hacking measure (which is true) and I'm pointing out that this article and the previous incident clearly prove that Blizzard's claims of "greater security" are fabrications.

You just read what you wanted to read, instead of what I actually wrote.

Draech:
In other words when I point out the correlation does not = causation by pointing to other service with different business practices that also got hacked.

Not a strawman.

Not an argument you didn't setup that I tried to knock down. Your argument. That I knocked down.

No, you knocked down a complete straw-man. One that you yourself fabricated because you didn't understand what my post said. When you're ready to actually discuss my real point, let me know. Until then, I'm going to ignore you. I have no interest in a meaningless argument of semantics and meaning with someone who doesn't have a leg to stand on. What's amusing is that you're already trying to deviate the topic away from Blizzard and onto me. I assume you think I didn't notice, but I did. You aren't defending Blizzard any more, you're just trying to attack me. And I'm not going to humor you any longer if you don't get back on topic.

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