Scams you've encountered

 Pages 1 2 3 4 NEXT
 

Having recently graduated High School and moved onto college, I've encountered a couple (convincing at first glance) scams. Both of them promise success with hard work, but ultimately you end up paying.

Shortly after graduating High School, I got a letter in the mail from "Vector International" or something like that. This will probably seem familiar to a lot of people. I was excited at first by the prospect that finding work could be that easy, but after reading I got the feeling of "too good to be true". I immediately looked them up on line and everything I found said that they were a scam.
For those not familiar with the proccess: Vector is a knife supply company. You have to buy a demo set (or at least you used to have to) which sets you back over a hundred bucks. From there you have to go door to door, or call people.
I actually knew a couple people who ended up doing it. One of them told me her boss was a total ass, and you only get paid if you can arrange presentations or make sales.

The second: College Works Painting. Some random person pasted out little pieces of paper before a lecture, asking for our contact information for an "internship". I filled it out, hoping to be able to build work experience and all that. I got a call from someone claiming to be following up on it. There was a short telephone interview, and she scheduled a meeting with me the next day (today). I met with her at the campus coffee place (there should be big red lights going off in people's heads by this point) with four other people. She explained how great the company is. About half way through she handed out pamphlets which were filled with grammatical errors. Two of the people just left (the better idea).
From what I read online, you work as a manager (not a real intern) and manage a branch of a home-painting business. Fourty percent of the revenue goes to the company, then you pay for supplies and labor. If there's anything left, you can keep it. Most of the time, between the competition and poor design, you end up either in the hole or making a couple dollars an hour.

Only one that I distinctly remember (namely because I fell for it...)

In college, I received a call from this membership club thingy. They were doing test runs of their service by offering two free magazine subscriptions of the person's choice to try out the club...

Fuck me. This "money saving club" charges you $150 per month to be part of it (which you became part of with this "free" magazine subscription). I have no fucking clue how they got my account information since I never gave it to them but all of a sudden my account was losing money. Attempted to cancel....HA! I STILL might have a fucking membership since I never found a way to cancel it.

Now in full panic mode, I do something real drastic: I shut down my bank account. SUCK ON THAT MEMBERSHIP PEOPLE!!!!

So I lost $150 and had to shut down a bank account. Lesson learned: If it's free, assume there's a catch.

triggrhappy94:
Shortly after raduating High School, I got a letter in the mail from "Vector International" or something like that.

I did Vector (Cutco) for a summer. I wouldn't say they are a scam, at least not a total scam. It's quite possible for the right sort of person to make quite a lot of money from them. I know someone who did. You have to have salesmanship skills, but more importantly you have to know a lot of wealthy people. Since I had neither, I did very poorly. But that doesn't make them a scam.

Incidentally, I still have my Cutco demo set. The knives still cut just as well as they ever did after over 15 years of regular use.

My mother bought a copy of "Who's Who Among American High School Students". That's a scam.

Oh yeah. Had a guy call my house phone and ask me for $10000 to get my daughter back.

Problem: I was 15 at the time, and sure as hell didn't have a daughter. AND scams like that had already hit the news, and the cops were telling people to watch out for it.

SomeLameStuff:
Oh yeah. Had a guy call my house phone and ask me for $10000 to get my daughter back.

Problem: I was 15 at the time, and sure as hell didn't have a daughter. AND scams like that had already hit the news, and the cops were telling people to watch out for it.

Wha.....uh.....huh....whaaa?

How would that even work? Let's say, for fun, that they get ahold of a father who has a daughter and looked up "Gullible" in the dictionary when his friend told him that it was the first word written in there.

"OH MY GOD!" the father (who is not Liam Neeson or else you'd get a different speech) yells in a panic. "Of course I'll pay!"

...now what? You don't just have $10,000 on hand (unless you're a drug dealer of course) so you would need some time to get the money. Maybe in the few hours or so it would take for you to get to your bank and explain that you need $10,000 for...stuff...you would at some point, you know, give your daughter a call?

tippy2k2:

Wha.....uh.....huh....whaaa?

How would that even work? Let's say, for fun, that they get ahold of a father who has a daughter and looked up "Gullible" in the dictionary when his friend told him that it was the first word written in there.

"OH MY GOD!" the father (who is not Liam Neeson or else you'd get a different speech) yells in a panic. "Of course I'll pay!"

...now what? You don't just have $10,000 on hand (unless you're a drug dealer of course) so you would need some time to get the money. Maybe in the few hours or so it would take for you to get to your bank and explain that you need $10,000 for...stuff...you would at some point, you know, give your daughter a call?

I have no idea, but one guy paid up $32000 before he realised his daughter was just fine.

Katatori-kun:

triggrhappy94:
Shortly after raduating High School, I got a letter in the mail from "Vector International" or something like that.

I did Vector (Cutco) for a summer. I wouldn't say they are a scam, at least not a total scam. It's quite possible for the right sort of person to make quite a lot of money from them. I know someone who did. You have to have salesmanship skills, but more importantly you have to know a lot of wealthy people. Since I had neither, I did very poorly. But that doesn't make them a scam.

Incidentally, I still have my Cutco demo set. The knives still cut just as well as they ever did after over 15 years of regular use.

My mother bought a copy of "Who's Who Among American High School Students". That's a scam.

This . I actually had an interview with them this summer . Then i went online and saw the comments . I pulled a no show , but it's not REALLY a scam , but a lot of people end up losin money instead of making money because their salementship sucks.

This is the only one i encounted other than bums coming up to me in the street for money.

I like how a spambot is posting in a scam thread. How appropriate.

OT: I filled in some information (not credit card info) on some "work from home" site. Then I got some call from some dumbass asking me for money and asking me if I've seen the commercials with Tom Bosley. And he kept mentioning Tom Bosley every chance he got like he expected me to give a shit who Tom Bosley was. And then I got a bunch of viagra ads in my e-mail. Fuckers.

jitelinnas:
snip

Spambot scam in a thread about scams? This is the best thing I've seen all week!

SomeLameStuff:
Oh yeah. Had a guy call my house phone and ask me for $10000 to get my daughter back.

Problem: I was 15 at the time, and sure as hell didn't have a daughter. AND scams like that had already hit the news, and the cops were telling people to watch out for it.

You've told that story here before, haven't you?
I remember reading it.

tippy2k2:

SomeLameStuff:
Oh yeah. Had a guy call my house phone and ask me for $10000 to get my daughter back.

Problem: I was 15 at the time, and sure as hell didn't have a daughter. AND scams like that had already hit the news, and the cops were telling people to watch out for it.

Wha.....uh.....huh....whaaa?

How would that even work? Let's say, for fun, that they get ahold of a father who has a daughter and looked up "Gullible" in the dictionary when his friend told him that it was the first word written in there.

"OH MY GOD!" the father (who is not Liam Neeson or else you'd get a different speech) yells in a panic. "Of course I'll pay!"

...now what? You don't just have $10,000 on hand (unless you're a drug dealer of course) so you would need some time to get the money. Maybe in the few hours or so it would take for you to get to your bank and explain that you need $10,000 for...stuff...you would at some point, you know, give your daughter a call?

It's just a matter of volume. If there's an x chance that a person has access to $10,000, y chance of a person having a daughter they can't or don't think to immediately contact, and z chance of a person being susceptible to drawing conclusions about vague info like this (it's similar to how fortune tellers work--make vague, general statements and some people will draw and verbalize specific conclusions, giving you more info to work with), then on average you'll find someone to dupe every 1/xyz calls. It's why mail/email scams are so effective. Maybe (to make up a number) only 1 out of a 10,000 are dumb/inexperienced/greedy enough to fall for the Nigerian prince thing, but if you email 100,000 people, you'll get a few marks. They tend to be elderly people, since they tend not to be as sharp as the rest of us, and many have access to large pools of capital in the form of retirement funds.

There was a particularly clever mail scam I read about once that went something like this: person mails a bunch of people saying he has insider info on some binary event, like which team will win a sports game. Includes the predicted winner of a future game and instructions on how to reply for more predictions. Sends, say, the next 4 for free to those who show interest, then asks for a sum of money for the next one. It works by just sending 50% of people one result and 50% of people the other. They halve their pool of marks every time, but if they cast a wide enough net, they'll have a significant number of people who just got five accurate predictions in a row, and many of them may be dumb enough to believe the next prediction is a sure thing.

OT: Living in a city, I encounter plenty of con artists with sob stories, and most are pretty forgettable "Nope, sorry" kinda encounters. This one, I was walking home at like 1am or something, and some guy came up to me with a story about how he went to a party or something, didn't know the neighborhood, lost his friends, got robbed, and now had no way to get home. Asked for $12 for a cab. (A few obvious signs right there: One, we were a few blocks from the $2.25 train; two, how would he know the expected cab fare home if he didn't know the hood he was in; three, $12 is a good number because it's around $10 but can net the person $20 if the mark doesn't have change and really wants to "help.") I said no, went home, didn't think much of it.

What made it memorable was a couple months later, I was walking home at like 1am or something, and some guy came up to me with a story about how he went to a party or something, didn't know the--

"Motherfucker, you tried that same story on me a couple months ago."

"...oh. Shit. Sorry."

the first scam is not so much a scam as it is a wide reaching sales team that penalizes failure. in fact if i'm not mistaken Avon uses the same method and when i left school about a million years ago i attended a "job interview" with roughly 300 other people using the same tactic to sell vitamins, if you have ever seen someone with a "lose weight now ask me how" badge then you know someone who has fallen for it

OT buddy of mine got a text saying someone had put a hit out on him but the hitman would let him live if he received 10,000 dollars

One scam involved someone posing as a police officer on the phone. My mom (understandably) got really scared until I talked to him. The conversation went like this:

Me: "Hello?"
GuyOnThePhone: "Yes, this is the police speaking. We're coming to arrest *my mom*. Is she there right now?
Me: "What for?"
GOTP: "Failing to pay taxes when you lived at *previous address*."

I put down the phone, and started laughing like a madman. And before anyone asks, no, you do not get arrested for failing to pay taxes. He called back and said that they were coming to our house. I calmly told him that I was going to confirm whether they were legitimate by calling 911 and confirming that my mom failed to pay taxes and if she was under arrest.

We never heard from those guys again after that as they made the mistake of calling my dad next. Trolling ensued...

bananafishtoday:
It's just a matter of volume. If there's an x chance that a person has access to $10,000, y chance of a person having a daughter they can't or don't think to immediately contact, and z chance of a person being susceptible to drawing conclusions about vague info like this (it's similar to how fortune tellers work--make vague, general statements and some people will draw and verbalize specific conclusions, giving you more info to work with), then on average you'll find someone to dupe every 1/xyz calls. It's why mail/email scams are so effective. Maybe (to make up a number) only 1 out of a 10,000 are dumb/inexperienced/greedy enough to fall for the Nigerian prince thing, but if you email 100,000 people, you'll get a few marks. They tend to be elderly people, since they tend not to be as sharp as the rest of us, and many have access to large pools of capital in the form of retirement funds.

There was a particularly clever mail scam I read about once that went something like this: person mails a bunch of people saying he has insider info on some binary event, like which team will win a sports game. Includes the predicted winner of a future game and instructions on how to reply for more predictions. Sends, say, the next 4 for free to those who show interest, then asks for a sum of money for the next one. It works by just sending 50% of people one result and 50% of people the other. They halve their pool of marks every time, but if they cast a wide enough net, they'll have a significant number of people who just got five accurate predictions in a row, and many of them may be dumb enough to believe the next prediction is a sure thing.

That...makes a lot of sense. You'd like to think that someone at the bank would question why Old Man Moneybags just came in for a large withdrawal but I suppose this just needs to work a few times for them to get their money's worth.

SomeLameStuff:
Oh yeah. Had a guy call my house phone and ask me for $10000 to get my daughter back.

And then the scammer phones up the grumpy bloke with the teenage nightmare daughter and the bloke says "i'll give it 2 hours and then i'll be charging you 10.000 to take her back off you".

Someone kept calling in a Chinese accent to tell me that I had won a Caribbean cruise, all expenses paid. Worst part was his painfully abysmal grasp of the English language. I had an old phone at the time with some exposed components in back that I could bridge with a piece of metal that generated an agonising screech for whomever is on the receiving end. Let me just say that after he could not answer any basic questions such as what my name was, where this call was coming from, how I won, or even what country he was calling they cycled through a couple more, slightly less deaf guys then never phoned again.

Not sure if this one qualifies as a 'scam' in as many words, but it set off all kinds of warning bells for me.

I got a cold-call email from an apparent marketing company. Being in the job market and having put up a resume on Monster, I found it a bit odd, but not unwelcome. I contacted them, they asked me to come in for an interview. I went in, they gave me something I quickly recognized as a pre-screening, gave me a small folder of materials and told me to read them over for a phone interview the next day. Looking it over I noticed a few details: 1) the name of the company listed on the paper didn't match up with the one I'd been introduced to. 2) The role had a very fancy title for what was effectively a door-to-door salesman who sold adspace for school sporting events, 3) They were very insistent on a hard-sell methodology and 4) Their pay scale was dependent on sales per week (Not commissions, persay, but an apparent tiered salary). Called for the phone interview the next day, was greeted by telling me I'd connected to the company listed on the paper rather than the one I'd met, who immediately started fast-talking me, telling me that I'd get a test run on monday, where I'd go to a certain commercial parking lot and prepare for a full days' work, calling this guy from time to time between pitches. From there we'd see if I really wanted to do this.

My prior misgivings nonwithstanding, that set off alarm bells. They planned to have me represent the company before I was even hired, with neither training nor supervision and without even so much as a formal interview[1]. Wild Rivers put more effort into vetting me and training me, and my role there was just to sit at the top of the rides and make sure people didn't go down on top of one another. Again, I'm not sure I'd call it a scam persay, but I simply cannot trust a company that puts so little apparent effort into human resources that they'll let anyone who answers an application represent their company without question.

[1] the 'phone-interview' even acknowledged as much when I commented on the prior day being a pre-screening, and he didn't ask any questions of me

I was selling a chair or something on Craigslist and got an interested party. He then claimed that he accidentally mailed me a $2000 dollar check and if I would cash it for him and send him 1000 dollars I could keep the rest. I guess they mail you fake checks and get you to cash them for. Apparently this is a pretty popular scam for morons.

I've never fallen for it, but I've run into the Microsoft phone scam.

For those who don't know, the scam works like this. You receive a call, and the caller says that they're some sort of representative from Microsoft, but are in fact just from some call center in India (easy to tell from the accent). The caller claims that your PC (doesn't matter what you actually have, they'll just say your Windows PC) is infected with multiple viruses, and that they need your permission to help clean it up. By using tactics such as making standard system errors seem like virus reports, they convince the person to go through some program that allows the person on the other end to take control of the computer, at which point they'll access whatever files are on their and just end the call there. It's been around for a while, and I've gotten at least three instances of this scam being attempted. You would think that at this point people would wise up, although apparently many still fall for it.

Best one I've had is someone phoning the house offering computer repairs after they had detected a computer virus on our phone line. Now my mum is as tech-illiterate as they come so she passed them onto me, had a little listen to what they had to say and started spouting absolute nonsense - "ah so is it a php phishing worm with ascii coding and a dtxs subroutine?" - they said yes to it and I laughed at them til they hung up, made my day.

Not exactly a scam but a story I never get tired of telling.

2 years ago I was working at a major hardware store, you know the one... We were having our christmas party and there was food left over at the end of the night. Since all the food was paid for and the catering company was just gonna take it with them our managers told us to grab whatever leftovers we wanted. I grabbed a steak and a burger. After the party I drove my date downtown and we parked in front of shop that was still open. We get to making out when I hear a tap on my window. I roll the window down and a homeless guy asks if I can spare some change, he's real hungry. I says to the guy I says "I don't carry cash on me but I just happen to be coming from a christmas party and I've got this delicious steak in the back seat. Let me grab it for ya". The guy says "No thanks" and walks on.

The fuck? Even if you did just want booze money who the fuck turns down free steak? If you're a homeless vegetarian your priorities are out of whack.

I used to get a load of emails from scammers saying that my account with a bank had been closed due to suspicious activity on my account and to fill in my bank details to reactivate my account. I used to look at those and think to myself "but I'm not with that bank, you have failed..."

Eternal_Lament:
snip

I had a bit of fun with these guys once, we have several computers in our house so i asked "which one?", the lady said the one in use (they all were), so i pretended to ask who was on the computer and then asked her what operating system was the virus in, she said with a very unsure voice "Windows Vista?"... All of our computers run either XP or windows 7, so I told her never to call again and hung up.

OT: I've run into quite a few of these scams, ranging from job offers, to phone and even mail scams, we just laugh and destroy the letters or hang up on them.

A scam you see in businesses like door to door and call centres is they often hire you for a 'training period' on low or even no wages knowing that most people can't afford to work for 2 weeks unpaid (since benefits usually get cancelled) and those that do agree will usually burn out after a few days and leave, meaning they've got dozens of man hours out of you for next to nothing.

Another version of that is something my girlfriends sister had happen to her. She applied to a marketing company and got onto a minibus with about a dozen others, they trekked about 20 miles out from the city to a small town where she found out it was a door to door job (she had asked and been told it wasn't). She said she wasn't interested and they just told her to leave, when she had no real idea where she was or how to get home. It's a trick to knock people out of their comfort zone and feel they have to sign up just to get home and they are often unpaid for the 'induction day' meaning if you do it often enough you have next to no staff overheads (as most people get home and quit).

tippy2k2:

That...makes a lot of sense. You'd like to think that someone at the bank would question why Old Man Moneybags just came in for a large withdrawal but I suppose this just needs to work a few times for them to get their money's worth.

frankly banks dont care about as little as 10.000. i withdrew my 36.000 savings when i was buying a place to live that was on term-based-saving before the period expired and no questions were asked. just "are you sure you want to do that as youd loose your interest".
if you were to wothdraw 100.000 then sure, they woudl question. 10.000 is nothing for them, they handle millions every day.

So i of course had couple nigerian scams email me, but those go to trash bin instantly.
The more interesting ones, once a guy called me from unknown number, as i was at work i was not intending to talk much for them.
He starts by saying (im translating from lithuanian obviuosly) "did you knew Laura died" (yes he used a name, taking huge chance). i answered No (i have a good friend named Laura, but i know she is in United Kingdom). then he does on to tell me how she is lieing in local church and how i should visit and whatnot. and i jut go "ok" since i dont want to start doing anything crazy while at work. and obviuosly that was not incentive enough, so he goes like "do you want to meet up or something". i was like WTF but he didnt wait for me to answer and actually dropped the call himself.
Laura is fine.

My grandpa used to get SMS all the time about variuos scams, but as he always asks me to read his messages for him it never worked. There was one time when he called me and asked me if i was ok, because apperently somone called him and told him i was in car accident. but he was smart enough to check on me first.

I am kidn of lucky when it comes to scammers on phone since i got a 10 year old pay-to-call card number and still use it, but since its being so old and pay-to-call its mostly delisted on all advertisement and scammers lists, so i VERY RARELY get any calls from people i havent gave the number to.

Comocat:
I was selling a chair or something on Craigslist and got an interested party. He then claimed that he accidentally mailed me a $2000 dollar check and if I would cash it for him and send him 1000 dollars I could keep the rest. I guess they mail you fake checks and get you to cash them for. Apparently this is a pretty popular scam for morons.

how do you cash a fake check? wouldnt the bank just tell you to FO and even call the police on you if you tried?

Now in full panic mode, I do something real drastic: I shut down my bank account. SUCK ON THAT MEMBERSHIP PEOPLE!!!!

So I lost $150 and had to shut down a bank account. Lesson learned: If it's free, assume there's a catch.

you should have contacted the bank manager. they hate scammers like these and would verly likely gotten your money back, canceled the subscription and depending on mood maybe even provided you with enough evidence to sue them.

My family was once selling an elliptical trainer on Gumtree and we got an interested buyer from the UK (we're in Australia). He "bought" the trainer through "PayPal" and "sent" us $2,100 (we were selling the trainer for $700). He then said that PayPal would release the money to us once we payed $1,000 into his bank account via the Western Credit Union to pay for delivery which confirmed by a grammatically atrocious letter from PayPal. Pretty sure PayPal doesn't hold payments.
It went on for a while before I threatened to go to the police because he kept harassing me about how he lost $2000 and PayPal can't refund it.

Eternal_Lament:
I've never fallen for it, but I've run into the Microsoft phone scam.

I love these guys. Nobody likes being bothered by tele-marketers, but they're just normal people stuck doing a less than satisfying job. The "Windows Department" guys, however, I vent my rage on. It's very cathartic.

Eternal_Lament:
I've never fallen for it, but I've run into the Microsoft phone scam.

For those who don't know, the scam works like this. You receive a call, and the caller says that they're some sort of representative from Microsoft, but are in fact just from some call center in India (easy to tell from the accent). The caller claims that your PC (doesn't matter what you actually have, they'll just say your Windows PC) is infected with multiple viruses, and that they need your permission to help clean it up. By using tactics such as making standard system errors seem like virus reports, they convince the person to go through some program that allows the person on the other end to take control of the computer, at which point they'll access whatever files are on their and just end the call there. It's been around for a while, and I've gotten at least three instances of this scam being attempted. You would think that at this point people would wise up, although apparently many still fall for it.

This once happened to me, the speaker was actually fluent in english, had a slight US accent.
Me: "We have been running 2 macs and a Linux for years, could i get your name, supervisors name and your number." phone goes dead...

1) When I was on vacation in Rome, a guy stopped by in a car and asked for directions to Piazza del Popolo. Despite an obvious question of "why are you asking a tourist", I humored him and gave him the directions. He then launched into a story about how he's a sales rep for Hugo Boss or something, showed me a bunch of (obviously fake) windstoppers he had on the pilot seat, he'll happily give one to me, but you know, he's been driving in circles for hours, he's out of gas and he doesn't have any change, so if he could get some money for that... I told him I didn't have any, his facial expression immediately changed from "friendly" to "fuck you" in that weird way only Italians can pull off and he drove off.

2) I live in Stockholm, a city infamous for its housing crisis, especially if you're an international student (seriously, I know people who are forced to bounce around for years, changing address every few months). Since landlords get hundreds of replies to their offers, they can pick and choose, and after two months of constantly being turned down you start getting a bit desperate. Long story short, the frustration (and constant pressure from my parents to finally find something) ended up with me succumbing to a scam and sending a deposit before meeting the "landlord" in person. Good thing is that after arriving in town, finding the place bolted shut, and the "landlord" not answering my calls, the police were real helpful and offered me a place to stay for a few nights (I ended up staying with a friend). Since then, I'm a lot less trusting and I've encountered a whole bunch of scammers operating along the exact same lines.

3) There was a pretty organized operation along a popular boulevard in my hometown a few years back. A smartly-dressed person would approach you, tell you about the "new luxury line of cosmetics" which will arrive in the store "next week" and offer you a free sample. Then, because you were so nice (of course), they offered to sell you some more at half-price! It was obvious they were reciting a script and yet, they somehow managed to keep the "arriving next week" thing going for a year or so before the population collectively wised up.

4) Phone scams - not sure how it works in other countries, but where I come from, as long as a salesman can get you to say "yes" to a sales offer on the phone, that counts as a contract. So they have scripts prepared to ask the question in the most roundabout way possible, just to get you to say the magic word. I distinctly remember being asked "whether that product sounds like a good thing to have in the house". Sadly, this works wonders on elderly people and my grandmother, who had some mental deterioration going by the time the scams hit in force, ended up ordering a bunch of phone offers and cable TV deals. We had a routine ready, I would chase away the install techs and my mom would take care of cancelling the contract (luckily, the 7 day resignation period still applied).

Wow, that's more than I expected.

I was messaged by some guy on Youtube that they loved my videos and wanted to become partner...

Impressive, considering I NEVER uploaded anything and don't plan to.

I think allot of dermotoligists scam people. They have always given me treatments for acne that never worked but was both physically painful and costly. Thousands costly. I've tried multiple dermatologists and they all want to try the same treatments.

I almost had my Steam account phished, thankfully Steam customer support rectified the situation. Now I am always careful about websites that look like Steam but have suspicious looking URLs.

Okay, neither of these are exactly scams, but...

(I suppose it's worth clarifying before this starts: I'm female.)

1. I was walking to the store once when I was 18 or 19 and some guy pulled over at the curb, came out of his car, and started talking to me. The first words out of his mouth were "Wow, hey! Are you 18? I drove around the block a couple times to make sure you weren't 12." So that was a great start.

I was kind of a dumb kid, so I just stared at him and said "What?" instead of getting the hell out of there. There were plenty of people around, and we were far enough from his car that I felt safe, though I probably shouldn't have.

Anyway, I'm going to summarize what he said over the next 10 minutes or so (my own contribution to the conversation was just staring and nodding and being totally confused):

"See, I'm a photographer, and I'd love it if you could model for me. I'll pay you enough money to get your hair and makeup and nails done beforehand. But there's this one requirement I have: you gotta shave, you know, down there. Cause I was showing some of my photos to a friend once, and he said, 'you sure this isn't a man?' and I said 'why?' and he said 'look at the bulge!' You know, the dresses these days are just so slinky. I really have to ask that you shave. Another thing, I exclusively shoot up near this remote lake over in the mountains, really beautiful place, but it's such a dangerous drive up there that I have to insist that I drive you myself. No one else is allowed, you know, no boyfriends, no parents, I can't take them along. So here's my card, my name is Antonius Smelt (yes, that's exactly the name he gave me), please call me back!"

And no...I never called him back. Good lord. I did give the card to the police though, just in case.

2. This one is embarrassing, since it was much more recent.

I was in a parking lot in my dented old car, looking for a space, when a couple guys in a big black van with PDR written on the side pulled up next to me and rolled down their window. One of them said "Hey, I saw the dents in your car, and I happen to have a paintless dent removal company. Would you be interested in a free estimate?" I figured it wouldn't hurt to get their card and then look them up online, so I said "Sure, give me your card." He agreed, and we parked.

Then he and the other guy in the van came out and started talking to me about the process and whatnot, without any evidence of a card like I'd asked for. In the meantime, another black van pulled up with three more guys in it, and they started chatting with the other two and pulling stuff out of their van.

I was feeling really overwhelmed at this point. I wanted to get back in my car and leave, but I was scared. One of them pulled out this suction cup thing and popped out part of one of the dents in my car and said "See, this is how we do it." At this point I realized I was actually negotiating with them, probably since it seemed like they had already started, and also I was never taught how to say no clearly. Always have to be the sweet, polite little girl who never hurts anyone's feelings, in my family...

So we haggled and finally agreed on $80. They pulled out a bunch of shit including crowbars, and other people in the parking lot were staring, and I was feeling just miserable. I saw them try to pull the same thing on another woman, and she was able to graciously decline and leave, and I was even more upset with myself.

When they finished, it was clear that they'd done a shoddy job. To be fair, it looked better than it did before, at least from a distance. Up close it looked like...well, it looked like I'd paid some random dudes $80 to remove the dents in my car with a suction cup and a crowbar.

I asked them how I was supposed to pay, since I didn't have enough cash. They suggested that we drive to an ATM down the block, and also, could I please make it $100? I felt incredibly uncomfortable with that suggestion, so I told them I'd try to see if I could get cash back from one of the nearby stores (which were a Michael's and a Best Buy). Of course they didn't give me any. So when I walked back from my second failed attempt, feeling ready to cry, I asked if they'd take a check or something. They said no: cash only.

So at that point I really felt I had no choice but to drive down the block with them. One of the guys offered to ride with me in my car, but of course I declined. Fortunately, he didn't press it. So that's how I found myself driving down the street with one large black van really close in front of me and one really close behind me, feeling like the biggest idiot I'd ever met and hating myself for leaving my cell phone at home that day, on top of everything else I'd done.

Well, we got to the ATM, they stayed in their vans at a safe distance, I got the money out, I paid them, and I left. Nothing else happened. But I couldn't help feeling terrible about the whole situation. They may not have scammed me per se, but they did take advantage of my hesitation and social anxiety. And what if they had decided to do something worse? I would have just gone along with it because I was scared.

That day was kind of a turning point for me. I knew I had to learn how to be more certain of myself. I'm not entirely there yet, but at least I don't care anymore about sparing people's feelings when they're trying to take advantage of me. (Yeah, thanks mom.)

Well...

I've played EVE for years... The scams that fly by every single second of every single day in the main trade hubs are quite the sight.

Never really found anything in real life though.

Friendly Lich:
I think allot of dermotoligists scam people. They have always given me treatments for acne that never worked but was both physically painful and costly. Thousands costly. I've tried multiple dermatologists and they all want to try the same treatments.

Some treatments work on some people and some on others. In medicine as such there is still al ot of trial and error due to how different people react to treatment.
So its not definitely a scam.

 Pages 1 2 3 4 NEXT

Reply to Thread

This thread is locked