Game People Calling: A Sequel Used to Mean Something

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SAMAS:

Unrulyhandbag:

SAMAS:
snip.

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In this case, the Familiar is the subject: Sunflowers. The New is of course the differences in the paintings. And the Refinemed would be improvements in his painting technique between each one, whether large or minute.

Sunflowers in this case is too broad. The subject in each picture is a different sunflower or arrangement of sunflowers it would be like having entirely different plots for each game but each based in the same sort of world.
ie: in a Fantasy realm in which magic use is rare but was once everywhere, the balance of nature is kept by crystals and society is at a medieval level. It's specific but allows for vastly different stories.

The sunflowers show little to no refinement they were painted in quick succession purely for display next to each other, and he never finished the series. Each was done simply to be interesting.
Refinement is a natural process not necessarily something to strive for in your sequels trying too hard has ruined many things and sometimes just ditching the whole lot and playing with a whole new concept gives better results.
For instance final fantasies skill\ levelling systems they could have stuck with the original system and striven for better balance slowly refining the system over the years instead we've seen jobs, materia, spell junctioning, summon junctioning, that strange map system in ten and so on. It's far more interesting, shows what can be done and keeps things fresh.

You can see final fantasy to be a conceptual series rather than a progressive one and it's part of what makes it success, people play them to see what's new and learn about an entirely new world and a new set of protagonists. Well until recently, now it seems they just bitch that things have changed.

Honestly I wish there were a lot less direct sequels in all forms literature, it's nice to see writers, filmakers and gamemakers explore their limits and create interesting works within an existing framework.

But look at C&C4, from what I can tell it's suffered a mass rejection for abandoning the core series gameplay. The ridiculous story certainly didn't help though. For the most part I think the fanbase of a certain series would rather have gradual refinement to gameplay and the continuation of story than new gameplay mechanics.

Unrulyhandbag:

SAMAS:

Unrulyhandbag:

SAMAS:
snip.

snip

In this case, the Familiar is the subject: Sunflowers. The New is of course the differences in the paintings. And the Refinemed would be improvements in his painting technique between each one, whether large or minute.

Sunflowers in this case is too broad.

Pardon my bluntness, but says who? You mention the Final Fantasy series below, in which the similarities between one game in the series and another vary. IV and V are more similar to each other than VI and VII, but there are still similarties.

The subject in each picture is a different sunflower or arrangement of sunflowers it would be like having entirely different plots for each game but each based in the same sort of world.

You mean like.... Most JRPG series'? Final Fantasy, Tales, Phantasy Star (which actually takes place on the same world(s)), Wild Arms, etc... The first 75% of every game is different (naturally, that last 25% always seems to be "Save the World").

ie: in a Fantasy realm in which magic use is rare but was once everywhere, the balance of nature is kept by crystals and society is at a medieval level. It's specific but allows for vastly different stories.

This seems like the first half of a comparison. Compared to what?

The sunflowers show little to no refinement they were painted in quick succession purely for display next to each other, and he never finished the series. Each was done simply to be interesting.

I would disagree. As my evidence, I would point to the Wikipedia article on the series. Compare the first sample one (not sure if it was first) with the ones shown elswhere on the page.

Refinement is a natural process not necessarily something to strive for in your sequels trying too hard has ruined many things and sometimes just ditching the whole lot and playing with a whole new concept gives better results.

But that natural refinement is improvement in and of itself. Compare Super Mario Bros 2(Lost Levels) and SMB 3.

For instance final fantasies skill\ levelling systems they could have stuck with the original system and striven for better balance slowly refining the system over the years instead we've seen jobs, materia, spell junctioning, summon junctioning, that strange map system in ten and so on. It's far more interesting, shows what can be done and keeps things fresh.

Naturally, the fandom complains about every single one. Seriously. If anything, that's usually the least welcome change in any Final Fantasy. You can garuntee an assload of complaining.

You can see final fantasy to be a conceptual series rather than a progressive one and it's part of what makes it success, people play them to see what's new and learn about an entirely new world and a new set of protagonists. Well until recently, now it seems they just bitch that things have changed.

Final Fantasy and most other JRPGs are conceptual in that there's little connection between games other than concepts (and sometimes the same character designer(s)). In their cases, the Familiar is shared elements such as Tonberries, Fire/Blizzard/Thunder a/ara/aga, certain musical pieces, and somebody named Cid. The New is each setting and characters, and the Refinement is all the new battle systems and graphical improvements.

Honestly I wish there were a lot less direct sequels in all forms literature, it's nice to see writers, filmakers and gamemakers explore their limits and create interesting works within an existing framework.

I honestly don't see much difference between the two. Neither method is inherently superior to the other.

Sometimes it's good for sequels to be straight rehashes. Personally, what I want out of a new Mega Man or Castlevania game is the same 8-bit inspired platforming in a new world with a different arrangement of weapons. (Thankfully Capcom and Inti Creates have been giving me exactly that with new Mega Man games.)

They're more the exception that proves the rule, though. The Bubble Bobble argument is a good one, and it's good to see things done differently. There's always a danger of changing too much, though, as suggested in the Final Fantasy comments above. Sequels are always a bit dangerous, and it's almost impossible to please everyone whichever path you take.

SAMAS:

I honestly don't see much difference between the two. Neither method is inherently superior to the other.

neither is superior each has it's place but we almost always get direct sequels.

However in gaming it often takes years to make each game and previous efforts are sometimes unplayable on modern systems so a non sequential series can be a benefit and if it's been a long time since the first game a large part of the audience may have never played it.

Publishers know this it's why every now and then we get a 'reboot' of an old series that takes only a few gameplay or story elements.

If you have a good story to tell or have a long term aim with a game series then clearly a sequential run with only minimal or required changes is going to be what you want, but not everything has a good story and sometimes the next game stretches the story way past breaking point.

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