what does "poorley written" mean?

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BrassButtons:
ISomething else you might want to check out is author Jenny Trout's blog where she's been doing chapter summaries of the 50 Shades of Grey trilogy. The books are a great example of bad writing, and Jen explains just what makes them fail so hard (she's also hilarious to read. But the books do have adult content, and Jen does write for mature audiences, so take that into account.) As a bonus, Jen is now releasing her own story in the same genre as 50 Shade (that's "BDSM romance" not "Twilight fanfiction") for free, so there's a well-written story for comparison.
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I think I read some of that...it was really funny! part of the reason being she's an erotic fiction writer and (rightdully) pissed 50 shades became so huge

of coarse I didnt need to read a blog to think "how the flying FUCK did this get published!?" honestly if 50 shades can get published I should just go ahead and write novel (kidding....but yeah)

tautologico:
Well-written prose can be incredibly boring, and badly-written stuff can be fun/exciting. In a story the emotional elements may draw the reader in more than simply whether the writing is "good" or "bad".
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can you call it badly written if its fun/exciting?

There are lots of things that constitute bad writing. Contradictions in characterisation and plot, overly artificial dialogue, redundant words in descriptions, lack of clarity. That's off the top of my head.

Vault101:

tautologico:
Well-written prose can be incredibly boring, and badly-written stuff can be fun/exciting. In a story the emotional elements may draw the reader in more than simply whether the writing is "good" or "bad".
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can you call it badly written if its fun/exciting?

Easily, go read 50 shades of Grey, it's so bad it's good.

Supertegwyn:
- Awkward dialogue (doesn't sound like a real person is speaking)

I, um...I think that if...you know...you were to...to have characters talk like, you know, like people really talk, then that would...um...you wouldn't make it sound all that good, I think.

TehCookie:
Easily, go read 50 shades of Grey, it's so bad it's good.

not the same thing though...since that wasnt the authors intention (or was it?) also if its a copy you bought yourself...even for the lolz you should feel ashamed

Next, you should ask the question "What is irony?".

Vault101:
I've seen peeople say things are "poorley written" when to me theres honestly nothing wrong

Such as? I'd be glad to dash those "things" to pieces.

Zachary Amaranth:
snip.

Inception...Mass Effect (actually in regards to mass effect I could pick it apart to hell, so I'd rather not right now)

Many people have gone into detail as to what generally makes up bad writing, and bad writing is largely subjective, but there are a few key things that tend to irk people off regardless of context:

Consistency

When a writer says something, the audience hates it when they go back on their words. This is because it destroys pretty much all of the continuity and meaning that had been built up to that point. This can be out of character moments, major continuity errors, and contrivances.

Condescension

Anything that a writer does that makes it seem like they are talking down to the audience will make the audience smirk at best and outright reject the writer at worst. This can range from pretentiously complex plots to preaching about a moral issue at the expense of the story.

Generally poor taste

This is the most subjecting of the bunch, but it's also the most likely to make people hate something. This can range from rape jokes (especially ones at the expense of the victim) to less serious things like odd character reactions. Basically, it can be summed up as taking things out of context or out of proportion.

Vault101:

tautologico:
Well-written prose can be incredibly boring, and badly-written stuff can be fun/exciting. In a story the emotional elements may draw the reader in more than simply whether the writing is "good" or "bad".
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can you call it badly written if its fun/exciting?

Yes, just like I can call enjoyable cookies slightly under or over cooked. Good and bad writing isn't a Boolean, it's a spectrum. I think many animes have wonderful plotting, but terrible characterization and dialogue. Furthermore, things can be unintentionally funny or enjoyable. My immortal is one of the most notorious pieces of writing on the internet, but you wouldn't know by all of the laughs people have had at it's expense.

Chatney:
Next, you should ask the question "What is irony?".

That's easy. It's like rain on your wedding day.

ClockworkUniverse:

Supertegwyn:
- Awkward dialogue (doesn't sound like a real person is speaking)

I, um...I think that if...you know...you were to...to have characters talk like, you know, like people really talk, then that would...um...you wouldn't make it sound all that good, I think.

Honestly, this is one of the things with reality. Reality doesn't have to come off as real, because it's real by its very nature. You really can't write things like that. The two can be similar, but writing has stricter boundaries. Well, in this context.

Vault101:

TehCookie:
Easily, go read 50 shades of Grey, it's so bad it's good.

not the same thing though...since that wasnt the authors intention (or was it?) also if its a copy you bought yourself...even for the lolz you should feel ashamed

How is that not the same thing? I doubt anyone goes "I want to write this so horribly people will enjoy it!" and you don't know either.

To the point, do people find the book to be poorly written? Yes they do, you said I should be ashamed for buying it so I'd wager you agree it's poorly written (not to mention I didn't buy it). Do people find it entertaining? You may not, but many others do. Therefore it is possible for something to be poorly written and entertaining.

It's the same reason The Room is enjoyed even though it's a bad movie, it's fun to watch.

Spade Lead:
Read Twilight. If Stephanie Meyer did it, you shouldn't.

Well. Stephanie Meyer wrote a book. And became rich off of it.

But you're right; I probably shouldn't do that.

OT: Anything about a written work can be poorly written. The dialogue, the pacing, the plot itself, and especially spelling and grammar.

There's no set "this = bad" in writing (barring the grammar). Because awkward dialogue, one-dimensional characters, rollercoaster pacing... all of it can go from bad to good. It's all about how you handle it.

And in the end, taste is subjective. There's an audience for everything.

DoPo:

Supertegwyn:
- Facts aren't right (5+5=12!)

'Do you remember,' he went on, 'writing in your diary, "Freedom is the freedom to say that five plus five make ten"?'

'Yes,' said the audience.

The bad writer held up his two hands, their backs towards the audience, with the all fingers extended.

'How many fingers am I holding up, audience?'

'Ten.'

'And if I say that it is not ten but twelve -- then how many?'

'Ten.'

The word ended in a gasp of pain. The needle of the dial had shot up to fifty-five. The sweat had sprung out all over the audience. The air tore into their lungs and issued again in deep groans which even by clenching teeth they could not stop. The bad writer watched them, the ten fingers still extended. He drew back the lever. This time the pain was only slightly eased.

'How many fingers, audience?'

'Ten.'

The needle went up to sixty.

'How many fingers, audience?'

'Ten! Ten! What else can I say? Ten!'

The needle must have risen again, but they did not look at it. The heavy, stern face and the ten fingers filled their vision. The fingers stood up before their eyes like pillars, enormous, blurry, and seeming to vibrate, but unmistakably ten.

'How many fingers, audience?'

'Ten! Stop it, stop it! How can you go on? Ten! Ten!'

'How many fingers, audience?'

'Twelve! Twelve! Twelve!'

'No, audience, that is no use. You are lying. You still think there are ten. How many fingers, please?'

'Ten! Twelve! Ten! Anything you like. Only stop it, stop the pain!'

Abruptly they were sitting up with the bad writer's arm round his shoulders. They had perhaps lost consciousness for a few seconds. The bonds that had held their bodies down were loosened. They felt very cold, they were shaking uncontrollably, their teeth were chattering, the tears were rolling down their cheeks. For a moment they clung to the bad writer like a baby, curiously comforted by the heavy arm round their shoulders. They had the feeling that the bad writer was their protector, that the pain was something that came from outside, from some other source, and that it was the bad writer who would save them from it.

'You are slow learners, audience,' said the bad writer gently.

'How can we help it?' they blubbered. 'How can we help seeing what is in front of our eyes? Five and five are ten.'

'Sometimes, audience. Sometimes they are twelve. Sometimes they are eight. Sometimes they are all of them at once. You must try harder. It is not easy to become sane.'

Since I don't know how to embed youtube videos I will leave you with this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o_eSwq1ewsU

And thank you good sir!

what does "poorley written" mean?

well for a start there's no e in poorly.

sorry i couldn't resist.

Good writing has life; you will feel the happiness, sadness and the other nesses oozing out of the writing. Bad writing bores me to fucking tears and makes me wish that the book was over. That's how I look at it, anyway. I guess that's why I'm such a picky reader...

Vault101:

Zachary Amaranth:
snip.

Inception...Mass Effect (actually in regards to mass effect I could pick it apart to hell, so I'd rather not right now)

Not to be a pain in the arse, but could you do some other examples, then? I got bored with Inception, so I can't comment on whether it's brilliant or bull because I never took the time to understand it. Mass Effect 3, you said you could do yourself.

Usually it's things like plot inconsistencies, trite or overused situations or cliches, excessive deus ex machina, poorly designed, unbelievable, or otherwise useless characters, excessive word use, lack of self-consistency (for example, if you have space ships that are a kilometer long and can somehow enter the planet's atmosphere and take off from a standing start, those ships can always do that. You don't introduce arbitrary rules that are only occasionally enforced), poor pacing, etc. For a good example of poor writing, see James Fenimoore Cooper's "Deerslayer" and basically all of the books in that series.

Zachary Amaranth:
Not to be a pain in the arse, but could you do some other examples, then? I got bored with Inception, so I can't comment on whether it's brilliant or bull because I never took the time to understand it. Mass Effect 3, you said you could do yourself.

I honestly cant remember any XD sorry

All of the above, with one extra.

If your story isn't engaging, it's poorly written. And not being engaging is usually because some part of the writing of said story has failed, whether it's bad characters, bad plot, or bad dialogue.

Although, you still can have something good which doesn't manage to succeed. You could have something which is inconsistent, annoying, and technically incompetent, that's still engaging, simply because it has something else. The plot doesn't have to make sense if it's fun while not making sense. The characters can suck if they're still fun. And the dialogue... well, dialogue has to be a little better, since it's largely how it's conveyed. Dialogue is part of how the other elements are conveyed, so it really has to work on some level.

There's two important categories: Execution and Content. Sniper Team 4 points out several good bits of content, which were poorly executed. Similarly, most of Star Trek is poorly executed (It's dated as hell), but it's good content. On the other hand, you can have things like Black Ops, or Battlefield 3 (First that come to mind), where the execution is proficient, but the content is boring rubbish, or stupid rubbish.

It's also a matter of tone, and the interaction between creator and viewer. If you make it as a serious dramatic piece, people will care about inconsistencies. If you play it as humour, they won't. Over the course of a story, the creator builds capital with the viewer. (Shamus Young did a great series on this, and Plot holes). There's always things unexplained, and often minor plot holes, but so long as you don't lose the trust of the audience, they'll go with it. If you completely screw it, then they won't. I'll have to dig up that link and attach it.

But really, so long as people are interested, and they think that what interests them is what you meant to do, then it'll be received as well written.

ClockworkUniverse:

Supertegwyn:
- Awkward dialogue (doesn't sound like a real person is speaking)

I, um...I think that if...you know...you were to...to have characters talk like, you know, like people really talk, then that would...um...you wouldn't make it sound all that good, I think.

I didn't mean that, and I think you know that. I mean things like Anakin in the Star Wars prequels. Nobody speaks like that, do they? (What he said, not how he said it)

It could be any number of things. Grammar and spelling mistakes, as well as other mechanical deficiencies, are one example. A poorly structured argument is another. Like one where it's hard to understand the point someone is trying to make or their arguments aren't written in a logical order. There is also poorly written in the from that it doesn't follow the conventions of art. Literature has certain principles that define what is good or bad and not following those principles makes it bad art which is often associated with "poorly written". It could also just be a nebulous insult at something that the reader didn't like. It's not really easy to put your finger on what 'poorly written' means without examining the situation and who said it.

Vault101:
I've seen peeople say things are "poorley written" when to me theres honestly nothing wrong

the thing is I dont think I have a very good grasp on what it means when somthing is "poorley written" aside from very obvious examples

so what is it?

-is it dialouge?
-is it charachters?
-is it the plot?

I'd like examples...and not painfully obvious ones like the room, but ones that are less obvious, and reasons why

reason I ask is (you may have seen from other threads) I've been getting into writing some stories and I want a better understanding of things I should be avoiding

A combo of all three. In addition, failure to maintain immersion. But one of the most important is detail economy. In Silent Hill 2, there's alot of sexual imagery and there's a reason for that. James is very sexually frustrated. But notice that not every single detail jumps to your face and at times, like when you first get the flashlight, these details are placed specifically to capture your attention. Also look at Final Fantasy VII. Machinery sticks out like a sore thumb everywhere it's displayed, and thats to reinforce the games "preserving nature" theme.

In books, JK Rowling and George RR Martin manage detail economy successful. More important characters or great tasting foods are given an appropriate amount of interesting details. Places that fill a character with emotion are well described, whereas other places are given quick descriptions.

Contrast to Twilight. Stephanie Meyer cannot manage details, for instance in New Moon: "'Ha, ha, ha," he laughed.'" Why is she giving both action and exposition in one sentence?

Or in the very first sentences of the original Twilight:

"My mother drove me to the airport with the windows rolled down. It was seventy-five degrees in Phoenix, the sky a perfect, cloudless blue. I was wearing my favorite shirt - sleeveless, white eyelet lace; I was wearing it as a farewell gesture. My carry-on item was a parka."

Ok, she just slammed us with a million back-to-back details in the first paragraph. We have no idea who this character is other than she or he has a mother and a favorite shirt. We don't know how the temperature feels, we don't feel the wind blowing through the car. Stephanie Meyer had so much opportunity to establish gender just by having the wind whip her hair around. She could have opened with how the character was going to miss this weather. She could have been holding a single plane ticket which could've told us that she would be going alone. That is poor detail economy

Vault101:
can you call it badly written if its fun/exciting?

Yes. As an example, reading translated Japanese Light Novels. Thanks to the nature of the translation, they often come across like a 6 year old wrote them. The events happening within, however, are fun and exciting. Were it to have been written by an English Speaking person, rather than translated to English, it would have to be called bad writing. Awkwardly constructed sentences, awkward dialogue - the whole thing is just awkward. But what the story it tells is still good.

Vault101:

Zachary Amaranth:
snip.

Inception...Mass Effect (actually in regards to mass effect I could pick it apart to hell, so I'd rather not right now)

Inception I'll put down to them being some of the few in the world who maybe didn't get what was going on, and mistook it for poor writing at times. Haven't watched it in a while, so there might be something wrong with it that I can't remember, but from memory it was alright.

Mass Effect... It depends on which one they're talking about, and which part they're talking about. The dialogue is hit or miss. Some of its good, some of its great, some of it is terrible. Picking all the terrible options, and the dialogue comes across as poorly written. Otherwise there are certain points in each of the games, some moreso than others, that are just awkward, unfitting, and generally just don't work.

What constitutes bad writing is never carved entirely in stone. A good writer can take a tired concept or one that's been continuously proven ineffective and one day flip it on it's head and make it a revolutionary new idea with it in literature.

But there's a general consensus on what is 'bad' in writing at current, and again it depends entirely what you're writing for, so typing it all out I could go on for days, and I'm sleepy. It's poorly executed ideas in a nutshell.

So... google it.

Bad writing in books, bad writing in film, games, cartoons, tv shows, fan fiction.

You name it. The internet will tell you.

TehCookie:
[...] I doubt anyone goes "I want to write this so horribly people will enjoy it!" [...]

I think the main difference between something beeing "so bad it's good" and something beeing crafted to be amusing out of it's sheer absurdity (aka seeming bad but actually beeing put together well) is like the difference between someone falling on his arse by accident and good slapstick comedy. Both can be amusing, but they are so for diffenrent reasons.

OT: I guess it breaks down to consistency in a lot of places. Is the world consistent? Act the caracters consistent within the rules of this world? Do the events happening seem to fit in the world? If everything that is supposed to be consistent with the universe really seems consistent it isall the greater and shocking to have something deliberatly out of place.

Edit
Also: Enjoy what you enjoy. It really doesn't matter if you like artfully crafted prose with masterfull use of language or if you prefare ham and cheese to the point of hilarity. Variety is a grat thing to behold and there is no reason to judge people for enjoying different things.

To me it is often bad storyline and inaccurate characters and settings.
Pace is also a major turn off, but I can bear it is the story and character is good.

I think Harry Potter was interesting at first and the lost it's pace around the fifth book.

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