Is DC's Darkseid a Superman Villain or an Everyone Villain?

 Pages 1 2 NEXT
 

I have the impression that he is an everyone villain, but for Superman he has a personal stake when fighting Darkseid?

Can anyone explain this?

Darkseid is an everyone villain that only Superman is strong enough to reasonably fight. So, he only tends to show up in Superman comics and team-up books.

Darkseid has acted as a villain against the entire Justice League, most notably recently in Final Crisis. Kind of a similar level to Brainiac.

I find he is a Justice League villain.

Samtemdo8:
I have the impression that he is an everyone villain, but for Superman he has a personal stake when fighting Darkseid?

Can anyone explain this?

Sort of. See, Darkseid is one of very few villains that drive Superman to the point he's willing to kill because of how he treats his people. The man is a militant fascist dictator that indoctrinates people from an early age to the point where even when they're given an opportunity to free themselves from his rule, they HELP him recover from the beating Superman gave him.

Superman does have a somewhat personal stake in fighting him, but Darkseid is a villain that everyone would fight against, both because he is insanely powerful, he has a large army, and he has wide reaching influence and corruption.

He was originally created to be a foe to other Fourth World characters, like Orion, The Forever People and Mr. Miracle. But he did first appear in Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen. To use a half-decent simile, he's a Superman villain only in the sense that Doctor Doom is a Fantastic Four villain or Kingpin is a Spider-Man villain.

Queen Michael:
He was originally created to be a foe to other Fourth World characters, like Orion, The Forever People and Mr. Miracle. But he did first appear in Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen. To use a half-decent simile, he's a Superman villain only in the sense that Doctor Doom is a Fantastic Four villain or Kingpin is a Spider-Man villain.

...Doctor Doom isn't a Fantastic Four villain?

Asita:

Queen Michael:
He was originally created to be a foe to other Fourth World characters, like Orion, The Forever People and Mr. Miracle. But he did first appear in Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen. To use a half-decent simile, he's a Superman villain only in the sense that Doctor Doom is a Fantastic Four villain or Kingpin is a Spider-Man villain.

...Doctor Doom isn't a Fantastic Four villain?

Yeah, like I said, the simile is only half-decent. He's clearly mainly a villain of theirs originally, and it's still clearly their rogues' gallery where he fits. But most of the time nowadays, he appears to fight somebody else (or fight a large bunch of heroes where they are included).

He's an everyone villain, but Superman is Superman, so when they want someone to Superman to punch they get someone like Darkseid. He became an arc villain in later seasons of the Superman cartoon, but reappeared in Justice League as a more general threat.

This is actually the reason why Mongul was invented. They needed someone on punchworthy terms with Superman, but didn't want to use Darkseid because they were evolving him into a Justice League enemy, so they made a carbon-copy of Darkseid - big guy from space, flat forehead, weird skin tone, likes to sit on a throne, conquers worlds with a mechanised world - and gave him a new name.

Mongul then turned into a more personal villain for Superman after Alan Moore wrote a story where he traps Superman in a Matrix-like ideal reality where Krypton was never destroyed and Superman grew up there and raised a family. When he woke up, Superman was understandably upset.

Asita:

Queen Michael:
He was originally created to be a foe to other Fourth World characters, like Orion, The Forever People and Mr. Miracle. But he did first appear in Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen. To use a half-decent simile, he's a Superman villain only in the sense that Doctor Doom is a Fantastic Four villain or Kingpin is a Spider-Man villain.

...Doctor Doom isn't a Fantastic Four villain?

It's actually the best comparison. While Doctor Doom and Kingpin are primarily antagonists for the Fantastic Four and Spider-Man respectively, their power and scope means that they've been used as antagonists for other heroes and for crossover threats. Doctor Doom is a wizard scientist with a time machine and his own country, so he fights the Avengers more often than not.

Meanwhile, Kingpin started out as a crime boss for Spider-Man to fight, but Spider-Man literally had too many archenemies, so they started using Kingpin for other "street-level" heroes in New York. Now Kingpin is now more closely associated with Daredevil and/or the Punisher than Spider-Man.

I believe he's mostly associated with Superman, but if I'm not mistaken he's one of the Ultimate evils of the DC Universe which kinda makes him an everyone villain.

Queen Michael:

Yeah, like I said, the simile is only half-decent. He's clearly mainly a villain of theirs originally, and it's still clearly their rogues' gallery where he fits. But most of the time nowadays, he appears to fight somebody else (or fight a large bunch of heroes where they are included).

Well, even back in the 70s there was the time when Dr. Doom tried to scam Luke Cage out of 200 dollars. Skip the video to 9:05.

bastardofmelbourne:
He's an everyone villain, but Superman is Superman, so when they want someone to Superman to punch they get someone like Darkseid. He became an arc villain in later seasons of the Superman cartoon, but reappeared in Justice League as a more general threat.

This is actually the reason why Mongul was invented. They needed someone on punchworthy terms with Superman, but didn't want to use Darkseid because they were evolving him into a Justice League enemy, so they made a carbon-copy of Darkseid - big guy from space, flat forehead, weird skin tone, likes to sit on a throne, conquers worlds with a mechanised world - and gave him a new name.

Mongul then turned into a more personal villain for Superman after Alan Moore wrote a story where he traps Superman in a Matrix-like ideal reality where Krypton was never destroyed and Superman grew up there and raised a family. When he woke up, Superman was understandably upset.

@OP Pretty much this. Darkseid is really on the power level of the New Gods like Orion but when it comes to the maintstream more popular heroes the only one who can even approach being able to take him 1 on1 is superman. Batman stands up to him in Final Crisis and uses a special bullet to disable him, but by and large he is a whole world/Justice League level threat. The dude is basically a god who runs his own military planet/indoctrination center. If you're looking for a good reference point for Darkseid check out Grant Morrison's Rock of Ages Storyline.

Bastard, I'm glad you mentioned that story because there's a great Justice League cartoon episode that covers that. I believe Superman, Batman, and The Martian Manhunter are all affected. Batman's and MMH's are particularly heartbreaking.

Supes takes it personally because Darkseid can hurt him and will be unrepentent about anything, which is something he can't accept. It's not personal. Darkseid only singles out Superman because he has no intention of letting any being defy him. He's only singled out by him in the sense that everybody else dies or serves.

bastardofmelbourne:
He's an everyone villain, but Superman is Superman, so when they want someone to Superman to punch they get someone like Darkseid. He became an arc villain in later seasons of the Superman cartoon, but reappeared in Justice League as a more general threat.

This is actually the reason why Mongul was invented. They needed someone on punchworthy terms with Superman, but didn't want to use Darkseid because they were evolving him into a Justice League enemy, so they made a carbon-copy of Darkseid - big guy from space, flat forehead, weird skin tone, likes to sit on a throne, conquers worlds with a mechanised world - and gave him a new name.

Mongul then turned into a more personal villain for Superman after Alan Moore wrote a story where he traps Superman in a Matrix-like ideal reality where Krypton was never destroyed and Superman grew up there and raised a family. When he woke up, Superman was understandably upset.

Asita:

Queen Michael:
He was originally created to be a foe to other Fourth World characters, like Orion, The Forever People and Mr. Miracle. But he did first appear in Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen. To use a half-decent simile, he's a Superman villain only in the sense that Doctor Doom is a Fantastic Four villain or Kingpin is a Spider-Man villain.

...Doctor Doom isn't a Fantastic Four villain?

It's actually the best comparison. While Doctor Doom and Kingpin are primarily antagonists for the Fantastic Four and Spider-Man respectively, their power and scope means that they've been used as antagonists for other heroes and for crossover threats. Doctor Doom is a wizard scientist with a time machine and his own country, so he fights the Avengers more often than not.

Meanwhile, Kingpin started out as a crime boss for Spider-Man to fight, but Spider-Man literally had too many archenemies, so they started using Kingpin for other "street-level" heroes in New York. Now Kingpin is now more closely associated with Daredevil and/or the Punisher than Spider-Man.

Alright time to ask a BIG question.

Who exactly are these NEW Gods? Who and What were the Old Gods for starters?

Samtemdo8:
Alright time to ask a BIG question.

Who exactly are these NEW Gods? Who and What were the Old Gods for starters?

It has a lot to do with Jack Kirby, Marvel, DC, and his personal beef with Stan Lee.

Jack Kirby was an artist who was one of the founders of the Marvel universe. Working with Stan Lee, he created the Fantastic Four, the Hulk, the X-Men, Iron Man, Thor, Doctor Doom, Galactus, Black Panther, and Ego the Living Planet, A.K.A "Chris Pratt's space dad." He even wrote the initial concepts for Spider-Man. The guy basically invented Marvel. Like a lot of writer/artist collaborations, it's hard to say how much of it was Kirby and how much was Lee, but it's safe to say that neither of them could have done it alone.

Anyway, in the 70s Kirby got pissed off with Stan Lee over something-or-other and decided to jump ship to DC. Now, Kirby had a personal taste for high-concept, pseudo-mythological science fiction, as shown by Galactus. While at Marvel, he'd created a title called the Inhumans, who were god-like precursors to humanity that had been given superpowers by alien experiments way back at the dawn of time.

The Inhumans didn't do much because they weren't that popular, and after leaving Marvel in the 70s, Kirby decided to create an ambitious new set of titles based around these guys called the New Gods. Like his earlier work at Marvel, the title was a space for Kirby to experiment with this idea of having a kind of galactic/universal space-myth, like the Greek and Norse pantheons but with godlike aliens instead of Thor or whatever. The New Gods were "new" in the meta sense, being a modern mythology for modern readers. The core plot of the New Gods revolved around a Manichean conflict spanning the universe between the two worlds of New Genesis and Apokolips, utopian and dystopian societies respectively. New Genesis, ruled by a Zeus-like figure called Highfather, was an Olympian paradise world. Apokolips, ruled by a Satan-like figure called Darkseid, was a hellish fire-belching machine planet. The two sets of gods were locked in an eternal conflict for the fate of the universe etc. etc. etc.

The actual plot followed Orion, a Hercules-like figure with a rad space scooter, and Mister Miracle, who was a very good escape artist. Orion was the son of Darkseid, and Mister Miracle was the son of Highfather; before the plot began, they had been exchanged as part of a mutual hostage arrangement to ensure a ceasefire. So Orion, who was basically the son of Space Satan, was raised by Space Zeus in Space Heaven, whereas Mister Miracle - who was basically Space Jesus - was raised in prison in Space Hell. It's actually a really cool story. Orion learns that he is destined to defeat his father Darkseid, and Mister Miracle falls in love with one of Darkseid's Furies and elopes to Earth to pursue his passion of becoming a professional escape artist (he grew up in a prison, it's smarter than it sounds).

However, the New Gods had the same problem the Inhumans did; they weren't very popular. They were Kirby's masterpiece, his pet universe that he had wanted to create for years, but readers didn't like them because the story was a bit esoteric and weird, and it was the 70s. Sales were never very good, the titles were cancelled before Kirby ever got to finish the story, and DC pushed Kirby into working onto projects he didn't like very much. In the mid-70s he got fed up with it and went back to Marvel.

Once Kirby was back at Marvel - surprise surprise - he creates these guys called the Eternals, who were - surprise surprise - primitive humans experimented on by godlike aliens called Celestials who take the role of modern mythological heroes. You can see there's a clear arc here; Kirby basically plagiarised himself twice over trying to get his vision of a science-fantasy pantheon of alien gods into shape.

But he could never get over the very basic hurdle that readers hated it; none of Kirby's space-god titles ever sold that well. But Kirby was a titan of the industry, the man who drew the Marvel universe, and his name carried massive weight. For DC, in particular, who had squandered a golden opportunity in convincing Kirby to switch sides and then wasting him on Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen and shit, they were banging their heads. They still had the rights to Darkseid and the New Gods, so they decided that they'd keep them alive and in the public consciousness - even though they never sold well enough to justify their own title - basically just to spite Marvel. Marvel themselves weren't much better; a few years after Kirby left and was elbow-deep into writing New Gods, Marvel came up with a suspiciously-similar-looking space demon with bad skin tone and a blocky forehead who liked sitting on chairs, only his name was Thanos.

And the thing is, it worked. Kirby was ahead of his time in a lot of ways; Darkseid got more popular as time went on, because he was a cosmic threat who could be used to justify the kind of massive crossovers that DC started pulling off in the 80s. He was basically a stand-in for Satan, existing so that Superman could punch the physical manifestation of evil and glue reality back together or whatever. The rest of the New Gods never showed up; only Darkseid was useful, and the general idea of "big evil space demon from space" was used in other big DC crossovers like the Anti-Monitor and Imperiex.

In particular, Darkseid caught the attention of one Grant Morrison, who in the late 90s was handed the JLA title and decided to reintroduce Darkseid as an antagonist for the Justice League. This eventually built up to the Final Crisis storyline in 2006, where Morrison reinterpreted Darkseid as less of a punching bag and more of a metaphor for the concept of evil itself; a terrifyingly powerful, reality-warping demon god whose very physical presence twisted space into a knot and who for some reason still decided to manifest as a block-headed dude with bad skin tone and a fancy chair.

By then, the New Gods had gained what you'd now call hipster cred; if you knew who they were in 2006, it meant you were showing off that you'd been a comic book fan since 1971. They were old enough to be embedded into the background of the universe despite never actually being very popular on their own.

And so now, when Zack Snyder says to himself "I've really heavily emphasised these Superman-as-Jesus metaphors in Man of Steel, and I figure we need like, a Satan guy for him to fight, y'know, get real Dante-style in here," the nearest comic book fan produces a copy of New Gods with a quizzical look on his face. And that's how we get to Justice League, although Darkseid probably won't be popping up personally since that would be the cinematic definition of premature ejaculation.

To be fair to Kirby the concept of New Gods supplanting the Old Classical Gods we know sounds awesome.

Very awesome write-up bastardofmelbourne, thanks.

OT: He's a DC villain, DC's number 1 villain in fact so he's often pitted against DC's number 1 hero, but I would never classify him as Superman villain.

bastardofmelbourne:
The truth!

Thank you for that, you clearly have the knowledge.

Ive a decent knowledge of marvel, a passing knowledge of DC but the behind the scenes stuff was fascinating to me.

So again, thanks for taking the time to post.

I always found it weird that a once Superman only villain became the big bad of the whole DC universe. I mean, if Superman was good enough to beat him once, why do you need to bring in the rest of League?

Hopefully they don't try to connect him to Superman too much in the DCEU. Although I guess it's too late, considering that scene with Luthor and Steppenwolf.

Credit where credit is due; He was basically relegated to the Fourth World comics before the 80's and probably would've stayed in obscurity had Paul Levitz not decided to make him the surprise Big Bad of his Great Darkness Saga in LOSH.

Hes really the big villain of the teen titans and music industry.

Like others have said, he's an everyone sort of villain but I believe he often gets paired up with Supes to show how powerful he is.

Worgen:
Hes really the big villain of the teen titans and music industry.

...

bastardofmelbourne:
although Darkseid probably won't be popping up personally since that would be the cinematic definition of premature ejaculation.

Isn't the entire DCEU the cinematic definition of premature ejaculation?

bastardofmelbourne:

Samtemdo8:
Alright time to ask a BIG question.

Who exactly are these NEW Gods? Who and What were the Old Gods for starters?

snip

No offense man, but I did not ask for a behind the scenes history I ask for the nerdy in universe lore written in th most epic way possible.

But did appreciate the read.

Samtemdo8:

bastardofmelbourne:

Samtemdo8:
Alright time to ask a BIG question.

Who exactly are these NEW Gods? Who and What were the Old Gods for starters?

snip

No offense man, but I did not ask for a behind the scenes history I ask for the nerdy in universe lore written in th most epic way possible.

But did appreciate the read.

Well, thanks to TvTropes, I have this, which seems sufficiently epic...

"There came a time when the Old Gods died! The brave died with the cunning! The noble perished, locked in battle with the unleashed evil! It was the last day for them! An ancient era was passing in fiery holocaust! The final moment came with the fatal release of the indescribable power - which tore the home of the Old Gods asunder - split it in great halves - and filled the universe with the blinding death-flash of its destruction! In the end there were two giant molten bodies, spinning slow and barren - clean of all that had gone before - adrift in the fading sounds of cosmic thunder... Silence closed upon what had happened - a long, deep silence - wrapped in massive darkness... it was this way for an age... THEN-THERE WAS NEW LIGHT!"

Anyway, two worlds were born, New Genesis (home of the "good" gods, led by Izaya) and Apokolips (home of the "bad" gods, led by Darkseid). They fought a long war until Izaya made contact with the Source (this predates Star Wars by several years, BTW) and brokered peace, sealing the deal by trading sons. The rest was explained by others already.

bastardofmelbourne:

And so now, when Zack Snyder says to himself "I've really heavily emphasised these Superman-as-Jesus metaphors in Man of Steel, and I figure we need like, a Satan guy for him to fight, y'know, get real Dante-style in here," the nearest comic book fan produces a copy of New Gods with a quizzical look on his face. And that's how we get to Justice League, although Darkseid probably won't be popping up personally since that would be the cinematic definition of premature ejaculation.

Excellent write-up, though when it comes to your comment about premature ejaculation, I feel like after the death of Superman being wasted so early, that's a very real concern to have.

Basically, in the DC Universe, it doesn't get any bigger than Darkseid. Even the Anti-Monitor can at best be claimed to be an equivalent threat depending on the depth of Darkseid's schemes.

I really hope they stick with the New Gods idea, because I feel like it would neat to have Wonder Woman, last of the of Old Gods, going up against the beings like that. Darkseid especially is a bit more than just an alien conqueror. He is many things.

FalloutJack:

Supes takes it personally because Darkseid can hurt him and will be unrepentent about anything, which is something he can't accept. It's not personal. Darkseid only singles out Superman because he has no intention of letting any being defy him. He's only singled out by him in the sense that everybody else dies or serves.

More like he knew Darkseid would stab them in the back which is exactly what happened in the episode that clip is from.

Agent_Z:

FalloutJack:

Supes takes it personally because Darkseid can hurt him and will be unrepentent about anything, which is something he can't accept. It's not personal. Darkseid only singles out Superman because he has no intention of letting any being defy him. He's only singled out by him in the sense that everybody else dies or serves.

More like he knew Darkseid would stab them in the back which is exactly what happened in the episode that clip is from.

I kinda find Bruce "DARKNESS!! DEAD PARENTS!!!" Wayne telling Superman to "get over it" just a bit hypocritical.

McMarbles:

Agent_Z:

FalloutJack:

Supes takes it personally because Darkseid can hurt him and will be unrepentent about anything, which is something he can't accept. It's not personal. Darkseid only singles out Superman because he has no intention of letting any being defy him. He's only singled out by him in the sense that everybody else dies or serves.

More like he knew Darkseid would stab them in the back which is exactly what happened in the episode that clip is from.

I kinda find Bruce "DARKNESS!! DEAD PARENTS!!!" Wayne telling Superman to "get over it" just a bit hypocritical.

Can we have a Batman that finally got over his trauma of his parents dying in front of him and moved on?

The whole "Why do you say that name" and "Darkness, No Parents" thing is symptom of larger problem of Batman writing, he cares too much to the point that becomes an annoying charcater flaw and a stupid weakness and people thinks Kryptonite is dumb.

Bruce its been decades already, move on and get a wife, start a family, and think of the future instead of dwelling in the past.

Samtemdo8:

McMarbles:

Agent_Z:

More like he knew Darkseid would stab them in the back which is exactly what happened in the episode that clip is from.

I kinda find Bruce "DARKNESS!! DEAD PARENTS!!!" Wayne telling Superman to "get over it" just a bit hypocritical.

Can we have a Batman that finally got over his trauma of his parents dying in front of him and moved on?

The whole "Why do you say that name" and "Darkness, No Parents" thing is symptom of larger problem of Batman writing, he cares too much to the point that becomes an annoying charcater flaw and a stupid weakness and people thinks Kryptonite is dumb.

Bruce its been decades already, move on and get a wife, start a family, and think of the future instead of dwelling in the past.

Snyder at least played it like an actual flaw unlike most Batman scribes. Hell, he even pointed out that Bruce's obsessive and paranoid nature was a result of a pointless war on crime rather than his default personality.

Samtemdo8:

McMarbles:

Agent_Z:

More like he knew Darkseid would stab them in the back which is exactly what happened in the episode that clip is from.

I kinda find Bruce "DARKNESS!! DEAD PARENTS!!!" Wayne telling Superman to "get over it" just a bit hypocritical.

Can we have a Batman that finally got over his trauma of his parents dying in front of him and moved on?

The whole "Why do you say that name" and "Darkness, No Parents" thing is symptom of larger problem of Batman writing, he cares too much to the point that becomes an annoying charcater flaw and a stupid weakness and people thinks Kryptonite is dumb.

Bruce its been decades already, move on and get a wife, start a family, and think of the future instead of dwelling in the past.

He can't because there would be no more Batman, that's the entire driving point of his character.

Agent_Z:

Samtemdo8:

McMarbles:

I kinda find Bruce "DARKNESS!! DEAD PARENTS!!!" Wayne telling Superman to "get over it" just a bit hypocritical.

Can we have a Batman that finally got over his trauma of his parents dying in front of him and moved on?

The whole "Why do you say that name" and "Darkness, No Parents" thing is symptom of larger problem of Batman writing, he cares too much to the point that becomes an annoying charcater flaw and a stupid weakness and people thinks Kryptonite is dumb.

Bruce its been decades already, move on and get a wife, start a family, and think of the future instead of dwelling in the past.

Snyder at least played it like an actual flaw unlike most Batman scribes. Hell, he even pointed out that Bruce's obsessive and paranoid nature was a result of a pointless war on crime rather than his default personality.

Too bad Snyder's idea might have been decent, however execution is...lacking.

I legit almost left the theater after that scene. Truly, some of the worst writing I have ever seen.

Kenbo Slice:

Samtemdo8:

McMarbles:

I kinda find Bruce "DARKNESS!! DEAD PARENTS!!!" Wayne telling Superman to "get over it" just a bit hypocritical.

Can we have a Batman that finally got over his trauma of his parents dying in front of him and moved on?

The whole "Why do you say that name" and "Darkness, No Parents" thing is symptom of larger problem of Batman writing, he cares too much to the point that becomes an annoying charcater flaw and a stupid weakness and people thinks Kryptonite is dumb.

Bruce its been decades already, move on and get a wife, start a family, and think of the future instead of dwelling in the past.

He can't because there would be no more Batman, that's the entire driving point of his character.

Well in my case its character driving point that has been run into the ground and if anything it makes come off as a baby.

And yes I know the man lost his mother and father to murder I completely understand how horrible that is, but the man has grown up now and is a billionaire Superhero.

Vito Corleone from the Godfather lost all of his family, including seeing his Mother's death and yet he grew up and lived in America, became a Mafia Boss, killed the man who killed his family, and yet he still ended up making a new Family and secure of future for the Corleone name. I don't see Vito still saying "Darkness, No Parents"

Samtemdo8:

Kenbo Slice:

Samtemdo8:

Can we have a Batman that finally got over his trauma of his parents dying in front of him and moved on?

The whole "Why do you say that name" and "Darkness, No Parents" thing is symptom of larger problem of Batman writing, he cares too much to the point that becomes an annoying charcater flaw and a stupid weakness and people thinks Kryptonite is dumb.

Bruce its been decades already, move on and get a wife, start a family, and think of the future instead of dwelling in the past.

He can't because there would be no more Batman, that's the entire driving point of his character.

Well in my case its character driving point that has been run into the ground and if anything it makes come off as a baby.

And yes I know the man lost his mother and father to murder I completely understand how horrible that is, but the man has grown up now and is a billionaire Superhero.

Vito Corleone from the Godfather lost all of his family, including seeing his Mother's death and yet he grew up and lived in America, became a Mafia Boss, killed the man who killed his family, and yet he still ended up making a new Family and secure of future for the Corleone name. I don't see Vito still saying "Darkness, No Parents"

Keep in mind Vito is not Batman, and everybody deals with trauma and tragedy in their own way.

Kenbo Slice:

Samtemdo8:

Kenbo Slice:

He can't because there would be no more Batman, that's the entire driving point of his character.

Well in my case its character driving point that has been run into the ground and if anything it makes come off as a baby.

And yes I know the man lost his mother and father to murder I completely understand how horrible that is, but the man has grown up now and is a billionaire Superhero.

Vito Corleone from the Godfather lost all of his family, including seeing his Mother's death and yet he grew up and lived in America, became a Mafia Boss, killed the man who killed his family, and yet he still ended up making a new Family and secure of future for the Corleone name. I don't see Vito still saying "Darkness, No Parents"

Keep in mind Vito is not Batman, and everybody deals with trauma and tragedy in their own way.

Heck, in an odd change of comparison for tone, Spider-Man lost his Uncle Ben and just like Batman, uses the death of a loved one as a motivation to make their life better for themselves. Though Spider-Man is not as dark as Batman is and both work under different ways of ideologies.

 Pages 1 2 NEXT

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here