Have you been disrespected or discriminated because you are an atheist
Yes
14.3% (9)
14.3% (9)
No
84.1% (53)
84.1% (53)
Want to vote? Register now or Sign Up with Facebook
Poll: Discrimination

 Pages 1 2 NEXT
 

I am an atheist and i often feel I am disrespected and discriminated by other people. Are there any other atheists here who feel the same? If you have a story please include it.

Not really. But then again, I live in fairly secularized Scandinavia. I really count myself lucky that your religious affiliations or lack thereof is considered your private business here.

As for the internet and what some religious crackpots out there might say, it doesn't actually impact me at all, so it really doesn't count. It's just sort of there, some of it comedic gold.

Not especially. Australia's pretty cool like that. Even if we have some absolute fuckwit religious politicians. But for the most part we're pretty good. Not as good as Scandinavia, but we are starting to get close to gay marriage, which I hold as a good indicator of a country's secularism.

I do have one friend (who I don't really see anymore after I saw some of his online comments regarding gay marriage), who used to get really angry at me for saying the word "god" when I made a mistake or something, but that hardly qualifies as discrimination.

Nope. I'm lucky enough to live in a mostly-secular society where people generally don't bother other people about what unprovable stories they believe in.

Yes, rather extensively really. Secular country or not, they're going to come after you if you dare think for yourself and leave them for what they are.

Blablahb:
Yes, rather extensively really. Secular country or not, they're going to come after you if you dare think for yourself and leave them for what they are.

Really? That thought process doesn't strike you as a paranoid? Then again I suppose if it does then you probably arent really paranoid.

I've had one of my friends say I was stupid for believing in evolution. He said that he just couldn't believe it because there was no evidence, and a lot of people agreed with him. -facepalm-

I live in the UK, so no i don't feel discriminated against. Then again, if i did proclaim myself as an atheist i may get a negative reaction in some rare cases because people may feel i'm taking a controversial stance and equate me with being a bit of a rabble rouser. Usually i just say i'm not religious, and i would recommend the OP say that, you may avoid perhaps some of the more serious negative reactions if your living in the states.

Nickolai77:
I live in the UK, so no i don't feel discriminated against. Then again, if i did proclaim myself as an atheist i may get a negative reaction in some rare cases because people may feel i'm taking a controversial stance and equate me with being a bit of a rabble rouser. Usually i just say i'm not religious, and i would recommend the OP say that, you may avoid perhaps some of the more serious negative reactions if your living in the states.

So if I read this right, saying you are "non-religious" in the UK is like telling someone you are from Texas in southern California, it gets them to leave you alone usually (my Mother has found success with this method in getting nutters to leave her alone while in Los Angeles).

Blablahb:
Yes, rather extensively really. Secular country or not, they're going to come after you if you dare think for yourself and leave them for what they are.

Hey Blablahb, I'd always imagined the Netherlands to be roughly the same as the UK when it came to overall religiosity. I've heard about the Dutch bible belt; are you referring about that part of NL, or is that the impression you get in general?

hardlymotivated:

Blablahb:
Yes, rather extensively really. Secular country or not, they're going to come after you if you dare think for yourself and leave them for what they are.

Hey Blablahb, I'd always imagined the Netherlands to be roughly the same as the UK when it came to overall religiosity. I've heard about the Dutch bible belt; are you referring about that part of NL, or is that the impression you get in general?

I'm a bit curious too. The American perception of the Netherlands is that it is one of the most left-wing permissive societies in all of Europe. The idea that there are religious conservatives in the Netherlands is one that is almost unthinkable but apparently they exist. Maybe its just talking to Blab or other Dutch people on this forum but it starting to sound like the Netherlands not only has religious conservatives (or at least conservative by European standards) but has a rather notable amount of them.

Seekster:
Really? That thought process doesn't strike you as a paranoid? Then again I suppose if it does then you probably arent really paranoid.

I wish it was paranoid. But I did get phonecalls and e-mails over it. Not much as I was pretty harsh on my response to third, fourth and so on, but still. The shit hit the fan when my wife, who used to attend a Reformist church in another village somewhat close to mine moved in with me (in a room in the same house, also to live closer to her studies, where I met her). First it was about church chores, as she was expected to come clean the church and houses of the pastor and elders for free. Then when that died down came the crap about needing saving and abandoning the flock. It didn't help the guilt trip worked on her and she said yes a few times to be rid of it. But in the end the elder showed up at our door. I don't know what happened exactly, but I got called in the supermarket by my wife who had locked herself in her room, that the elder was inside. I dropped everything and ran home (few hundred metres) where I indeed found him shouting in our living room. He wouldn't leave, so I dragged him out and had a bit of struggle when he tried to have a swing at me. Then he was outside, and I assured him I'd bury him on the spot if he raised his hand again or if I ever caught him near our house again. Pretty much I was angry enough to want to kill someone at that point. When I phoned the police and demonstratively waited in the door opening he left, and the police, despite thinking that charges would just get cancelled, did go to his home to have a serious conversation with him, and after that there was only one more e-mail.

Still I think that was more than my fair share of taking crap. Got to say I worry at times they'll try again. It's not the first thing that elder has done wrong in his life, I know that from others, so there's always a lingering thought about it.

But why I brought it up, is that I wanted to point out that living in a secular country doesn't mean you're safe from religious harassment. I mean, that guy invades my home, intimidates my wife, tries to have a swing at me when Imake him leave, and pressing charges would be useless? Not blaming the policemen there, they took it very seriously, but if you can get away with something like that, the prosecutor's office needs some work, as they clearly don't realise how threatening such an experience is.

Crazyiest of it all is, if I had let him strike me, and then punch him back, pressing charges would've been possible, that's what the officer told me when we discussed the details for his report, so basically I was getting punished for de-escalating the situation by not being able to see him face some consequences. That is kind of a bitter realisation. Not for me, I never allow people like him to bother me and I'd eat them for lunch if need be, but because after seeing how my wife felt after that, so shaken up and afraid, I really wanted to see that guy face a judge to tell him again with the voice of authority that he was totally in the wrong.

hardlymotivated:
Hey Blablahb, I'd always imagined the Netherlands to be roughly the same as the UK when it came to overall religiosity. I've heard about the Dutch bible belt; are you referring about that part of NL, or is that the impression you get in general?

Definately was referring to our bible belt in my case. Bunschoten-Spakenburg a typical fishing village.

Although outside of that are, there's also plenty of communities with such problems. I had a pretty extensive network of friends due to having had two secondary schools and finding most of my friends outside the village, so I've seen it happen to others than just myself. It's ussually the people who are first inside a church, and then leave or leave to a 'wrong' other church who get harassed over that, and the more fanatical the church, the worse it is. Which doesn't necessarily mean to say old fashioned. I knew someone who went from a strict Reformist church to a 'freedom happiness halelujah'-type evangelical church, which he later left, and he too got a huge number of so-called friends trying to guilt trip him or 'save' him. It also doesn't help that churches have free and full acces to the population registry, so they can track you down if you move house. Acces to that is normally barred for all private persons and organisations unless they can present a court order (think of baillifs and such).

Blablahb:

Seekster:
Really? That thought process doesn't strike you as a paranoid? Then again I suppose if it does then you probably arent really paranoid.

I wish it was paranoid. But I did get phonecalls and e-mails over it. Not much as I was pretty harsh on my response to third, fourth and so on, but still. The shit hit the fan when my wife, who used to attend a Reformist church in another village somewhat close to mine moved in with me (in a room in the same house, also to live closer to her studies, where I met her). First it was about church chores, as she was expected to come clean the church and houses of the pastor and elders for free. Then when that died down came the crap about needing saving and abandoning the flock. It didn't help the guilt trip worked on her and she said yes a few times to be rid of it. But in the end the elder showed up at our door. I don't know what happened exactly, but I got called in the supermarket by my wife who had locked herself in her room, that the elder was inside. I dropped everything and ran home (few hundred metres) where I indeed found him shouting in our living room. He wouldn't leave, so I dragged him out and had a bit of struggle when he tried to have a swing at me. Then he was outside, and I assured him I'd bury him on the spot if he raised his hand again or if I ever caught him near our house again. Pretty much I was angry enough to want to kill someone at that point. When I phoned the police and demonstratively waited in the door opening he left, and the police, despite thinking that charges would just get cancelled, did go to his home to have a serious conversation with him, and after that there was only one more e-mail.

Still I think that was more than my fair share of taking crap. Got to say I worry at times they'll try again. It's not the first thing that elder has done wrong in his life, I know that from others, so there's always a lingering thought about it.

But why I brought it up, is that I wanted to point out that living in a secular country doesn't mean you're safe from religious harassment. I mean, that guy invades my home, intimidates my wife, tries to have a swing at me when Imake him leave, and pressing charges would be useless? Not blaming the policemen there, they took it very seriously, but if you can get away with something like that, the prosecutor's office needs some work, as they clearly don't realise how threatening such an experience is.

Crazyiest of it all is, if I had let him strike me, and then punch him back, pressing charges would've been possible, that's what the officer told me when we discussed the details for his report, so basically I was getting punished for de-escalating the situation by not being able to see him face some consequences. That is kind of a bitter realisation. Not for me, I never allow people like him to bother me and I'd eat them for lunch if need be, but because after seeing how my wife felt after that, so shaken up and afraid, I really wanted to see that guy face a judge to tell him again with the voice of authority that he was totally in the wrong.

hardlymotivated:
Hey Blablahb, I'd always imagined the Netherlands to be roughly the same as the UK when it came to overall religiosity. I've heard about the Dutch bible belt; are you referring about that part of NL, or is that the impression you get in general?

Definately was referring to our bible belt in my case. Bunschoten-Spakenburg a typical fishing village.

Although outside of that are, there's also plenty of communities with such problems. I had a pretty extensive network of friends due to having had two secondary schools and finding most of my friends outside the village, so I've seen it happen to others than just myself. It's ussually the people who are first inside a church, and then leave or leave to a 'wrong' other church who get harassed over that, and the more fanatical the church, the worse it is. Which doesn't necessarily mean to say old fashioned. I knew someone who went from a strict Reformist church to a 'freedom happiness halelujah'-type evangelical church, which he later left, and he too got a huge number of so-called friends trying to guilt trip him or 'save' him. It also doesn't help that churches have free and full acces to the population registry, so they can track you down if you move house. Acces to that is normally barred for all private persons and organisations unless they can present a court order (think of baillifs and such).

Wow Blab, after reading that I don't think I can blame you for your overwhelmingly negative view towards religion. You had a bad experience with some nutter and I can't criticize you too much for letting that color your impression of all Christians or Theists.

Blablahb:

hardlymotivated:
Hey Blablahb, I'd always imagined the Netherlands to be roughly the same as the UK when it came to overall religiosity. I've heard about the Dutch bible belt; are you referring about that part of NL, or is that the impression you get in general?

Definately was referring to our bible belt in my case. Bunschoten-Spakenburg a typical fishing village.

Although outside of that are, there's also plenty of communities with such problems. I had a pretty extensive network of friends due to having had two secondary schools and finding most of my friends outside the village, so I've seen it happen to others than just myself. It's ussually the people who are first inside a church, and then leave or leave to a 'wrong' other church who get harassed over that, and the more fanatical the church, the worse it is. Which doesn't necessarily mean to say old fashioned. I knew someone who went from a strict Reformist church to a 'freedom happiness halelujah'-type evangelical church, which he later left, and he too got a huge number of so-called friends trying to guilt trip him or 'save' him. It also doesn't help that churches have free and full acces to the population registry, so they can track you down if you move house. Acces to that is normally barred for all private persons and organisations unless they can present a court order (think of baillifs and such).

Ah, gotcha. Cheers.

Although I am curious as to how churches have access to the population registry when the Netherlands doesn't have an established state church.

So do they not have a clear separation of Church and State principle in most European countries (I mean I know they don't in England because the state essentially IS the church but still)?

Muspelheim:
Not really. But then again, I live in fairly secularized Scandinavia. I really count myself lucky that your religious affiliations or lack thereof is considered your private business here.

As for the internet and what some religious crackpots out there might say, it doesn't actually impact me at all, so it really doesn't count. It's just sort of there, some of it comedic gold.

More likely to be discriminated around here if you are a theist of any kind.

Seekster:
So do they not have a clear separation of Church and State principle in most European countries (I mean I know they don't in England because the state essentially IS the church but still)?

All scandenavian countries have been seperated, but there are plenty who are still heavily influenced (balkans, Italy, etc)

Nah. Probably because I don't flaunt it and don't give any of my theistic and agnostic friends any bullshit.

Realitycrash:

Seekster:
So do they not have a clear separation of Church and State principle in most European countries (I mean I know they don't in England because the state essentially IS the church but still)?

All scandenavian countries have been seperated, but there are plenty who are still heavily influenced (balkans, Italy, etc)

Influence I don't care about so much. My point is that someone mentioned something about some government registry of Church members or what not and taxes going to the church and things like that which to me seem like trouble waiting to happen. Separation of Church and State is for the benefit of the state as much as it is for the benefit of the church.

Seekster:

Realitycrash:

Seekster:
So do they not have a clear separation of Church and State principle in most European countries (I mean I know they don't in England because the state essentially IS the church but still)?

All scandenavian countries have been seperated, but there are plenty who are still heavily influenced (balkans, Italy, etc)

Influence I don't care about so much. My point is that someone mentioned something about some government registry of Church members or what not and taxes going to the church and things like that which to me seem like trouble waiting to happen. Separation of Church and State is for the benefit of the state as much as it is for the benefit of the church.

I'm still officially a member of the Church of Sweden, due to the fact that I was born before 2000. So yeah, I'm supposed to pay tax and what not. Which I don't, because I don't care for it, and CBA with an application for leaving the church. They haven't complained.

Realitycrash:

Seekster:

Realitycrash:

All scandenavian countries have been seperated, but there are plenty who are still heavily influenced (balkans, Italy, etc)

Influence I don't care about so much. My point is that someone mentioned something about some government registry of Church members or what not and taxes going to the church and things like that which to me seem like trouble waiting to happen. Separation of Church and State is for the benefit of the state as much as it is for the benefit of the church.

I'm still officially a member of the Church of Sweden, due to the fact that I was born before 2000. So yeah, I'm supposed to pay tax and what not. Which I don't, because I don't care for it, and CBA with an application for leaving the church. They haven't complained.

Yeah the idea of paying taxes to support the church or needing to put in an application to leave the Church is completely unheard of over here.

Realitycrash:

All scandenavian countries have been seperated, but there are plenty who are still heavily influenced (balkans, Italy, etc)

Denmark does not have them seperate.

Seekster:

Yeah the idea of paying taxes to support the church or needing to put in an application to leave the Church is completely unheard of over here.

Aye, which is one thing I admire about the US. The Church of Sweden used to be the state church and thus had such priviligies. Hell, as recently as the 19'th century, Sweden was what would today be a dictatorship. The state church was the only "true" church, and the only one allowed to operate freely, and all citizens were expected to be members. The fact that the state and church is now separate does put what we've achieved in the 20'th century in perspective. The church-taxes are more or less a remain of the time when the state operated the "official" church. It's like the monarchy, a remnant of old days we've haven't got around to (or had the heart to) chuck out.

It's fairly easy to get out of that tax requirement, however. I just haven't yet because I don't make enough money yet for it to really matter. Furthermore, while not a christian anymore, I still think of the church as a part of our cultural legacy, for good and ill. And honestly, the Church of Sweden is very benign, quite modern and open. There's worse uses for my money, really. And the upkeep for those nice churches has to come from somewhere.

I'm not christian, but I certainly know a fine-looking bit of architecture when I see one. Would be a shame to see it fall in disrepair.

Seekster:
So do they not have a clear separation of Church and State principle in most European countries (I mean I know they don't in England because the state essentially IS the church but still)?

In the Netherlands, in theory church and state are completely separate since the days of the Batav Republic (1795). However, the separation in custom is not complete. For instance new laws, in their literal text, are announced 'by order of the queen, by the grace of god', refering that the house of Orange-Nassau supposedly rules by the grace of the Christian god, and the 'troonrede', a yearly speech by the queen about all the important matters of state of that year is closed with a prayer.

The real problem however is that our constitution is non-binding, meaning you can't rule a regular law to be null and void because of being unconstitutional. Well-known example is the deceptively named Law on Equal Treatment, that allows employers to discriminate based on skin colour, gender and other things (AA-type racism) while the first article of the constitution forbids discrimination.

As a result, since the days of the French occupation, Christian politicians have been gaining power hand over fist, resulting in:
-Religious schools being funded by the state, while not being held to the same standards
-The Dutch 2 euro coin carries the text 'god be with us' on the side
-some city councils open every meeting with a prayer despite it being state business
-clerical marriage can not be carried out untill civil marriage is done. Basically priests can only marry already married people, to emhpasize marriage is not a religious matter. A priest of any kind performing a religious marriage between two unmarried people commits a crime. (this is a good thing I think, but still binds the religious ritual into state business)
-The 1953 Sunday Law forbids any form of public entertainment on sundays before 13.00
-In addition, the Shopping Times Law forbids stores to open on sundays, regardless of the religion of the owner or staff. There's a workaround by designating an area a 'touristic zone', but canceling this law has been impossibble several times.
-All government employees get an obligatory day off on five Christian celebration days, pay for people who work then is either doubled or tripled.
-Religious marriage officials are allowed to discriminate homosexuals by refusing to marry them. Since 2007 they can not be sacked for this.
-Religious schools are allowed to force their religious rules onto pupils and teachers alike, but public schools aren't allowed to demand a religion-free environment, and employees openly practising a religion can not be forced to stop that, leading to a blatant double standard. For instance girls at my former secondary school (which I left after two years) got in trouble for wearing trousers during the winter. They were forced to wear a skirt at all times.
-Almost all priests in the Caribean parts of the Netherlands are in service with the Dutch government as government employees.
-Those same islands do not carry out the laws of the Netherlands in regards to gay marriage, equal rights and non-discrimination because their local leaders are too religious. Anyone bringing down the hammer on that is accused of racism and colonialism.

Especially that last bit annoys me. They fucking ARE a colony, that's why we pay all their bills and cover the costs of the rampant corruption there. In return we should get to make them do as the government says, just like with any local government.

Seekster:

Nickolai77:
I live in the UK, so no i don't feel discriminated against. Then again, if i did proclaim myself as an atheist i may get a negative reaction in some rare cases because people may feel i'm taking a controversial stance and equate me with being a bit of a rabble rouser. Usually i just say i'm not religious, and i would recommend the OP say that, you may avoid perhaps some of the more serious negative reactions if your living in the states.

So if I read this right, saying you are "non-religious" in the UK is like telling someone you are from Texas in southern California, it gets them to leave you alone usually (my Mother has found success with this method in getting nutters to leave her alone while in Los Angeles).

My point basically was that if you title yourself as an atheist you are more likely to be perceived as taking up a potentially confrontation position. Like if one identified themselves as a communist, anarchist, Tory, Republican or Democrat i suppose. By identifying one self as non-religious, you neutralise the confrontation risk.

Realitycrash:

Seekster:
So do they not have a clear separation of Church and State principle in most European countries (I mean I know they don't in England because the state essentially IS the church but still)?

All scandenavian countries have been seperated, but there are plenty who are still heavily influenced (balkans, Italy, etc)

State and church aren't separate in Norway.
So I guess that only leaves Sweden, really.
I did hear some rumours that the church and state are going to be separated soon though.

OT: No, never. Despite having a state-church, Norway is a fairly secular country, and you're expected to mostly keep your religion to yourself.

Jonluw:

Realitycrash:

Seekster:
So do they not have a clear separation of Church and State principle in most European countries (I mean I know they don't in England because the state essentially IS the church but still)?

All scandenavian countries have been seperated, but there are plenty who are still heavily influenced (balkans, Italy, etc)

State and church aren't separate in Norway.
So I guess that only leaves Sweden, really.
I did hear some rumours that the church and state are going to be separated soon though.

OT: No, never. Despite having a state-church, Norway is a fairly secular country, and you're expected to mostly keep your religion to yourself.

Well, derp.

I refer to my self as agnostic. No one really bothers me except internet atheists who want to tell me that I am a fence sitter or that I am really an atheist and don't know how to label myself.

Not too much, but I've had a few such encounters. I live in a place (I don't want to say country because I can't speak for everywhere here, Bavaria is highly religious except for larger cities, for instance) where few people give that much of a damn about religion and those that do are usually frowned upon by both the non-believers and the moderately religious. There still are plenty such folks who bother me and other passing people every now and then, but it's not anywhere near actual discrimination for me. You live in the USA, of course, which is a much more problematic place in terms of religious favouritism and discrimination. Disrespected, though? Sure.

Never really, apart from the guys who yell at you on Queen Street in the city nobody really seems to give a shit.

Skeleon:
You live in the USA, of course, which is a much more problematic place in terms of religious favouritism and discrimination. Disrespected, though? Sure.

The USA is itself pretty varied on this regard. While there might very-well be discrimination in remote rural areas, it's not really typical of the US as a whole. I expect judging by demographics that a lot of cases of discrimination that are reported by american atheists here has less to do with them being in America and more to do with them being in or having recently been in American high schools, where the whole social order is practically engineered to make people miserable.

Also, I really question a lot of these claims of discrimination when they don't come with full information of what actually happened. I have observed a very clear trend within New Atheism of people trying to exaggerate or over-emphasize the discrimination they supposedly face. Oddly a lot of these claims of oppression come from white males aged 18-30. One sometimes wonders if they aren't claiming oppression or discrimination in order to just get more attention. For example, a few months back someone on this board tried to tell me that atheists were getting censored, when it turns out that there were really just a couple cases of advertisers refusing to print aggressive atheist signage that was to some degree hostile to non-atheists. I am also a young(ish) white male. I've lived in countries where it is legal for rental agencies to deny me housing simply because of my race. That's real discrimination, but I'm not sure even then it's really fair for me to claim to know what being discriminated against feels like. I'm probably never going to have my house firebombed. I'm never going to be told I can't develop a property I own that happens to be within a few kilometers of ground zero. I'm never going to be stopped by police (at least not in the US) simply because of how I look. I'm never going to have people on an airplane be afraid to sit next to me. No one is going to question that I have a legal right to work here. No land lord is ever going to put up a sign forbidding my people from swimming in the apartment pool. If there is ever a TV show about me, people may demand it be cancelled for being boring, but no one is ever going to boycott advertisers claiming the show doesn't properly portray me as a threat to America.

So when I see atheists claiming to have been discriminated against, I have to wonder: were they really discriminated against? Or did someone just not like them very much? Because the two are very different things, and I think it does a great disservice to people who are actually discriminated against to pretend you have it bad just because some people don't like you.

Katatori-kun:

The USA is itself pretty varied on this regard. While there might very-well be discrimination in remote rural areas, it's not really typical of the US as a whole. I expect judging by demographics that a lot of cases of discrimination that are reported by american atheists here has less to do with them being in America and more to do with them being in or having recently been in American high schools, where the whole social order is practically engineered to make people miserable.

Also, I really question a lot of these claims of discrimination when they don't come with full information of what actually happened. I have observed a very clear trend within New Atheism of people trying to exaggerate or over-emphasize the discrimination they supposedly face. Oddly a lot of these claims of oppression come from white males aged 18-30. One sometimes wonders if they aren't claiming oppression or discrimination in order to just get more attention. For example, a few months back someone on this board tried to tell me that atheists were getting censored, when it turns out that there were really just a couple cases of advertisers refusing to print aggressive atheist signage that was to some degree hostile to non-atheists. I am also a young(ish) white male. I've lived in countries where it is legal for rental agencies to deny me housing simply because of my race. That's real discrimination, but I'm not sure even then it's really fair for me to claim to know what being discriminated against feels like. I'm probably never going to have my house firebombed. I'm never going to be told I can't develop a property I own that happens to be within a few kilometers of ground zero. I'm never going to be stopped by police (at least not in the US) simply because of how I look. I'm never going to have people on an airplane be afraid to sit next to me. No one is going to question that I have a legal right to work here. No land lord is ever going to put up a sign forbidding my people from swimming in the apartment pool. If there is ever a TV show about me, people may demand it be cancelled for being boring, but no one is ever going to boycott advertisers claiming the show doesn't properly portray me as a threat to America.

So when I see atheists claiming to have been discriminated against, I have to wonder: were they really discriminated against? Or did someone just not like them very much? Because the two are very different things, and I think it does a great disservice to people who are actually discriminated against to pretend you have it bad just because some people don't like you.

So, what you're saying is, in essence, that just because there are people who are discriminated against to a greater degree than atheists, atheists simply are never discriminated against.

You are dead wrong; the world simply doesn't work like that.

But sure, maybe it's the case that every single person ever leaving a church because they have stopped believing in god and being treated like shit because of it is just a massive twat. Do you seriously believe that?

Discrimination is already a vastly overused term, let's not add to it any more than we have too.

If you are refused a job, or treated like dirt when you decide to leave a religion, or stoned to death because you don't believe.. sure, you're being discriminated against.

Lets face it though, how often is an Atheist just as much of a twat as a religious person.. if not more so?

Now, I'm an Atheist. I always have been, and I've had some abuse from some religious folks over the years.

But I've seen just as much abuse aimed at other believers by my "fellow atheists", in many cases people who just wanted to live their lives and harmed nobody.

Unless you're actually being denied something essential, or being badly abused, accept one fact in life... assholes are everywhere. There are religious ones, atheist ones, white ones, black ones, probably even polka dot and mermaid ones.

Craorach:
But I've seen just as much abuse aimed at other believers by my "fellow atheists", in many cases people who just wanted to live their lives and harmed nobody.

And how much of that were religious people who entered into a debate about religion, lost, and then went 'ooh, now I feel offended'? That happens a lot of the time, and the majority of 'ohnoes, atheists bother me' topics seem to come from people who are a bit frustrated over losing debates they hoped to decide in favour of their religion.

That shouldn't be confused with being offensive. Being right, is well, quite right after all.

Blablahb:
And how much of that were religious people who entered into a debate about religion, lost, and then went 'ooh, now I feel offended'? That happens a lot of the time, and the majority of 'ohnoes, atheists bother me' topics seem to come from people who are a bit frustrated over losing debates they hoped to decide in favour of their religion.

That shouldn't be confused with being offensive. Being right, is well, quite right after all.

Enter into a debate, accept that the other party won't agree with you, quite right.

Walking down the street, going to your place of worship, or simply mentioning "I was with a friend from church and.. " in idle conversation at work however is not entering into a debate.

I have seen people deliberately go to churches and start abusing the people there, I have seen a group of nuns giving food to the homeless get abused by a drunken atheist, and I have seen a man who admitted to taking reassurance in his faith after his wife of sixty years died, get told he is a moron. None of these people did any more to offend an Atheist than I do walking down the street when I'm accosted by street preachers.

Okay, as Atheists, we are of course "right".. but unless a religious person is actually harming us, forcing their views upon us or harming others, they should be just as left alone as we should be.

 Pages 1 2 NEXT

Reply to Thread

This thread is locked