266: Making Fun Ain't Always Fun

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Biag:
All of those points make the industry sound like a living hell.

All of those points make me want to work there more.

Same here..

Wait a second? Does this mean that candy factories aren't full of oompa loopas that sing and dance too?

Game development isn't just "game development". There are many different positions to fill, such as graphic effects programmer, engine programmer, game logic scripter, tool programmer, etc. I think that the amount of fun you will have depends on your job description fitting your inclinations and on how much freedom you enjoy in realizing your work.

If you enjoy hacking away at low-level code and clever programming, you will likely flourish as a graphic effects programmer, and it will be very rewarding to you to see all that hard work come to life in the game. Or you might prefer working directly inside the game world, by doing some high level scripting, such as quests and plot events. As with any other job, it depends on if you're doing what you really like to do.
Another important factor is how much freedom you have to do things your own way. It's always more fun to realize your own vision of things than to implement stuff that other people have thought up for you.

It's definitively wrong to say that game development is automatically a fun job because you're working with games. I think this may be the grave misunderstanding that alot of people might have. But it's also not right to claim that game development ist mostly just tedious, nerve wrecking hard work. Actually I think that game development isn't that different from any other job. If you're working with something that interests you, you will have fun. Otherwise it might be tedious and just another job.

Urge to post Master_of_the_Obvious.jpg rising....
rising....

Despite what literally EVERYONE has said about game design, I'm still going for it. One of the best schools in the country for game design, a faculty with understanding tech and dabbling in very small amounts of code is all i got, but i can safely say that I'm gonna try the fuck out of it come hell or high water or man eating opossums. If it is as impossible as everyone says, than there has to be something wrong with the world, cause there are more game companies than i can shake a stick at.

I was never under any illusions that making games would be as fun as playing them. It is much the same as my relationship with Pizza. Making Pizza is not as much fun as eating it.

I've talked to people from DICE, and they said the exact opposite. The bosses had to chase the employees home because they were having way too much fun at their job. Perhaps it's the fact that they're such a large studio, I don't really know.

I'm still a student in high school, and i want to become a game designer, and when i read this article, i didn't really feel turned away, going to my school (we do the IB, look it up) you already live simply for the thrill of having an idea that works and that gets done well. Not to mention that fact that i have already considered some of the points here.

I'm not exactly a hardcore gamer, i love playing games, but i don't have the money to buy all the new ones. My most recent purchase was for the playstation 2, so i'm not really in the loop of all the awesome games. I don't even have any other console. But when i am at a friends or playing some of my games, i actually already analyze them. I may not have the inside knowledge of how a game goes together, but i look an the mechanics, graphics and the game as a whole.

The thing is, i think everybody does to some extent. Some people are limited to "it sucks" or "it rules" but they can't explain why, but the majority of people i know do analyze, and i encourage other players to do so as well. it's a good thing, you can see what the game is striving to be and how the games different aspects add up as a whole.

the article really was pointing out that too much of a good thing isn't good, and i think that encouraging the behavior to analyze is important. it means that an improvement in the sequels is noted and appreciated, you see the light side of the game and what it was meant to be and you see the effort and thought put to the way the game plays.

So well done on the article escapist, you've made me want to be a designer more, and you've let me show people that analysis isn't always bad

I think the distinction should be made between large team commercial development and developing games in general. Game development is not inherently life destroying, but when large amounts of money are involved, that's when the fun disappears.

I was a web designer a while ago for about 3 years, and so I know what it's like to tinker with the HTML and CSS to try to get the page looking exactly what you want it to look like in all the major browsers. I can only imagine this to be the same, only many orders of magnitude more complex.

I currently do tech support for an ISP, and I am looking for a change. This article has completely put me off getting into Game Develpoment, which was something I was considering. I may have even been good at it as well, but I guess I'll never know since I value my work/life balance.

You'll just have to do like Valve: use Loads of time on your games, then 1...The game your team is developing, will be rather awesome, IF you put the best into it.(wich true decelopers love to do) 2. you will have fun. There is almost no stress. If you the developer was stressed all along with the development of the game, you can almost be serten that the game will end up as a bunch of crap... People don't like crap...Neither do I.

Totally not a bot:
You'll just have to do like Valve: use Loads of time on your games, then 1...The game your team is developing, will be rather awesome, IF you put the best into it.(wich true decelopers love to do) 2. you will have fun. There is almost no stress. If you the developer was stressed all along with the development of the game, you can almost be serten that the game will end up as a bunch of crap... People don't like crap...Neither do I.

Thing is about Valve, no other developer in the world has the kind of steady income coming in that Steam brings in for Valve. The can take it easy and still have a job unlike about everyone else.

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