The Big Picture: With Great Power

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I'd say Bob is partially right, in that there's still a few people around who are convinced you can't call yourself a "geek" if you haven't been persecuted or marginalized. I always thought that perception was wrong. In the world we live in now, gadget fetishism and being hooked on some cult Sci-Fi TV show from Great Britain are qualifiers enough, and there's about hundreds more you could find out there. The "persecuted nerdy kid" imagery needs to go away - and not just for folks like us. I'm always peeved by kids' TV shows that use that trope to establish that the protagonist is a sympathetic underdog, for instance. Yes, underdogs still do exist, but I've gone through my entire high school and college years without being subjected to anything that even vaguely resembles a bully or a stereotypical jock.

As for us needing to change and become a force for good - aren't we already? I mean, divisive opinions can't be consistently avoided, and like it or not, racism, sexism and homophobia are going to keep permeating online gaming services. At this point, though, this has nothing to do with us anymore. Peer pressure is what's causing thirteen year-old kids or adults lacking some form of mental stimulation to think that calling some stranger a faggot or a "noob", even, is socially acceptable. IdrA, for instance, isn't so much a staple of the Starcraft community, in that you'll find hundreds of idiots who feel the need to trash-talk their way through any game whatsoever. They don't need to, of course - but psychological warfare has been more or less institutionalized into gaming culture. Otherwise we wouldn't have needed to cope with idiots like Aris Baktarians stinking up the fighting game scene.

"We" will keep maturing. "We" will be a force for good, yes - but Bob's a bit naive if he assumes we have the ability to take the bad seeds, give 'em a Carebear Stare and wash all that stupid bigotry and those exclusionary politics away. There's always going to be someone who's going to claim they have the ability to roost on a moral high ground right above us - because it's mostly unavoidable.

The long and short of it is pretty clear: just don't be this guy.

FargoDog:

This isn't a 'geek culture problem'. This is a people problem.

This.

Bob, you know the supposedly larger-than-normal amount of nerds acting racist, sexist, or homophobic? Has the thought ever occurred to you that a lot of people in general like that and that this goes way beyond a made-up subset of Western culture?

I would say that everybody in the world needs to see this, especially nerds, but I worry that the very thing that has led us to have this reaction in the first place would prevent many of the people Bob is calling out here from actually adhering to the idea in any significant way.

That said, I like to think of "trendy groups" like this one as having a life cycle not dissimilar to a person: we have progressed from the infantile "we just wanna have fun and play with our friends" to the childish "I don't understand why nobody likes me, I just like the stuff I like and now I'm lonely and sad" to, now, a rebellious teenage "these assholes were mean to me before so now I'm going to make everybody's life miserable because I CAN." Eventually, we as a geek culture will make it to adulthood and hopefully (cross your fingers), our "life experience" which is made up of the culture's entire history will allow us to grow into mature, responsible adults with a real handle on how to behave and how not to behave in order for things to be the way Bob opines here.

But as it stands, as much as I agree with all of his points (especially the thing about who the primary demographic making up geek culture has traditionally been), this entire video sort of feels like a parent lecturing a teenager about his or her potential and how he or she is not meeting it. True, but falling on deaf ears - at least for a few more proverbial years.

bravetoaster:
Bob, you had me until the whole plight of the white heterosexual male geek.

Can someone please explain how/why so many self-identifying geeks think they're a special case or hold onto harassment or bullying for more than 10 minutes after being done with school?

Did you finish the video? Because what Bob eventually said about that was that geeks shouldn't hold onto that hatred after they grow up. That it's wrong for anyone to take the pain from their past and push it onto others. Yes bullying has happened and will continue to happen, but it should never lead to the exclusion or bullying of others.

One of the common themes of dissenting opinion to this video is effect vs. desire. I.e., "We never wanted to be mainstream culture, so that means we should be fighting against mainstream culture now that they took all our favorite things."

While I can understand why people could get angry at seeing some contemporary forms of nerd culture blatantly missing the point, I see no reason why we're openly hostile towards our dominance of popular media. We should be rejoicing that more people are interested in our favorite things. We should be grateful that we're no longer isolated islands amidst the streams of the internet.

Instead, we are drawing battle lines and acting as if the counterculture elements imposed on us are sacred to our enjoyment of the vidja games and summer action movies.

We spend so much of our time writing and saying such spiteful comments to anyone who would dare to be curious about our likes, our problems, our world, that we forgot what it was that brought us here in the first place.

A friend letting us in.

Maybe it was a kid on your street who was overjoyed to share their latest spoils from the comic book shop. Maybe a chess club in your teens where someone invited you to a game of DnD afterwards. Maybe in college you had a roommate who left you a seat on the couch anytime they brought home a new horror movie.

However you got here, I can pretty well guarantee you didn't spontaneously become a nerd. We let you in here. We've always had an open door policy. And we'll never have a reason to change that.

No. NO. NO. Defining yourself as part of "X culture" has NEVER SOLVED ANYTHING. It doesn't matter which group is in charge or which one belongs to. The very fact that some people feel the need to define themselves as part of a broader societal group IS THE PROBLEM. Geek/nerd culture can't be a better mainstream because it is a client-side phenomenon - it is a crutch to give certain people who are not confident enough to define themselves as themselves through association with a group.

GEEKDOM/NERDDOM ARE NOT IDEOLOGICAL, POLITICAL OR EVEN CULTURAL MOVEMENTS!

Look, I see where you are coming from, and from the perspective of a white US-American born in the early 80s, that might hold true. But from my perspective (if you want to go into the demographics here: German, born in 1988), this kind of view should not be perpetuated.

Admittedly, the observations concerning the changing mainsteam are absolutely right.

For all intents and purposes, I would be a Nerd/Geek. I do LARP. I play pen and paper RPGs. I play PC and console games most of my free time. Yet, I refuse to classify myself as such. All kinds of "persecution" I have suffered during my childhood by bullies is owed to my own personality and behavior, not because I belong to some ominous social class or culture of "geek/nerd" denomination. I work as a manager in a marketing department, for crying out loud, and never even so much as thought of hiding my hobbies in a job interview. I have LARP in my CV, and all that's elicited so far were very interested questions and a couple of "hey, a friend of mine does that too"s. I know half a dozen LARPing lawyers, local politicians and mid-level managers. And it's not just me - I know plenty of people who might fit this odd definition of "geek/nerd" but have never had a problem with that in adulthood.

Final conclusion: Geek/nerd-dom is a creation of our childhoods to account for the discrepancy between our parents telling us that we are "just right" and others telling us we were weak. But that had nothing to do with some sort of cultural membership, but with ourselves. We didn't want to see it, but there were plenty of jocks around who played RPGs and the likes as well. Since we hate to take responsibility, we try to make ourselves part of some greater persecuted group, and THAT IS DANGEROUS!

TheRightToArmBears:
What the dickens are you talking about?

Whilst yes, Metallica and Black Sabbath are widely appreciated outside of the metal community, they're the two biggest metal bands in history, which does not equate to metal or even a subgenre being accepted. When did I say what could and couldn't be metal either? You seem to have completely misunderstood what I was saying.

Well, you obviously didn't express yourself well, because you spoke of popular metal not being considered "metal" by the "real" metal culture. But now you say they are metal. Which means that metal has been accepted by the mainstream.

So, which is it?

Lono Shrugged:
A persecuted bunch of people attain "power" and choose not to persecute others themselves.

That would be a first in human history Bob...

chaos theory says, it is not only possible...
it is inevitable.

Lilani:

uanime5:
Geek culture is composed of male, white, heterosexual, cis-gendered, unatheltic, well-off people because that's the people who it appeals to. Try to make it more appealing to women, non-whites, homosexuals, trans-gendered, athletic, or poor people can only be done by diluting this culture so much that it becomes the same mundane sludge that everyone complains about because it lacks any sort of depth.

Orly? Then what is this little Science Fiction show I keep hearing about, that broke down racial barriers on TV like no other show had done in the past, and continued to in its future "Generations?"

Did Star Trek actually appeal to black people because there was a black woman in it (Uhura was pretty much a background character)? Did having Worf in Star Trek Generations and having the Klingons be an all black race make it more appealing to black people (Worf and the Klingons were an important part of the overall story)?

If not then it wasn't changed to make it more appealing to black people. There's a difference between including minorities and making a show more appealing to minorities.

While yes demographics are still being exploited, as they were exploited in yesteryear, we now have the kind of numbers and communication networks that can cause multi-billion dollar corporations to completely change their products and business models before they even hit the shelves. I think, if exercised the right way, we can prove that the demographics of the 1950s no longer apply today.

What does 1950's demographics even mean?

Not just so that females and non-whites can start getting a bit more representation in entertainment media, but also to make sure our entertainment is of the highest quality possible.

Either you want more females and non-whites in the media, or you want highest quality possible. You cannot make something high quality while trying to conform to some arbitrary gender and radical quota. Seriously such quota would have ruined Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter, and Game of Thrones.

Do you really think sticking to demographics raises the quality of creative works that come out? Demographics are the product of consumer statistics, focus groups, and rudimentary sociology. Remember what else was the product of focus groups? Bioshock Infinite's "gunbro" cover with Elizabeth relegated to the back. And remember how Naughty Dog had to fight tooth and nail to keep their protagonist female in Remember Me? Do you really think that kind of pressure to homogenize and not have "minorities" is a good or healthy thing for the creative works that make up our subculture?

Since you seem to have no clue what you're talking about allow me to explain it to you.

Firstly consumer statistics, focus groups, and sociology when used correctly are the most effective way to find out what people want. The fact that the target audience doesn't meet your standards for gender and radical correctness doesn't mean their decisions were wrong, it means that you gender and racial ideals aren't important to these people.

Secondly Bioshock Infinite showed a range of covers to their target audience and asked them to choose which one they liked the best. The "gunbro" cover won. The fact that this decision didn't meet your gender standards doesn't make consulting the people who are going to buy this game wrong. Studies have shown that unpopular covers mean fewer game sales.

Thirdly game sales show that action games with female protagonists sell fewer copied than those with male protagonists, so it's no surprise that the publisher wanted a game with a male character. Again the fact that reality shows that female protagonists aren't as popular as male protagonists isn't the fault of demographics.

Fourthly try getting your information about demographics from somewhere other than Jimquistion. He just complains about things but doesn't do any research into why these things are happening and always assume that someone who doesn't have his opinion is wrong.

Fifthly I want good games, not mediocre games that correspond to gender specific ideals of white knights. So if this means that there won't be any games with minorities that's fine with me.

Well said, Bob.

First half of the video- Woo! Go geek culture!

Second half- While the notion of getting everyone to drop their prejudices is a good thought... I don't think it'll be that easy.

Monsterfurby:
No. NO. NO. Defining yourself as part of "X culture" has NEVER SOLVED ANYTHING. It doesn't matter which group is in charge or which one belongs to. The very fact that some people feel the need to define themselves as part of a broader societal group IS THE PROBLEM. Geek/nerd culture can't be a better mainstream because it is a client-side phenomenon - it is a crutch to give certain people who are not confident enough to define themselves as themselves through association with a group.

GEEKDOM/NERDDOM ARE NOT IDEOLOGICAL, POLITICAL OR EVEN CULTURAL MOVEMENTS!

Look, I see where you are coming from, and from the perspective of a white US-American born in the early 80s, that might hold true. But from my perspective (if you want to go into the demographics here: German, born in 1988), this kind of view should not be perpetuated.

Admittedly, the observations concerning the changing mainsteam are absolutely right.

For all intents and purposes, I would be a Nerd/Geek. I do LARP. I play pen and paper RPGs. I play PC and console games most of my free time. Yet, I refuse to classify myself as such. All kinds of "persecution" I have suffered during my childhood by bullies is owed to my own personality and behavior, not because I belong to some ominous social class or culture of "geek/nerd" denomination. I work as a manager in a marketing department, for crying out loud, and never even so much as thought of hiding my hobbies in a job interview. I have LARP in my CV, and all that's elicited so far were very interested questions and a couple of "hey, a friend of mine does that too"s. I know half a dozen LARPing lawyers, local politicians and mid-level managers. And it's not just me - I know plenty of people who might fit this odd definition of "geek/nerd" but have never had a problem with that in adulthood.

Final conclusion: Geek/nerd-dom is a creation of our childhoods to account for the discrepancy between our parents telling us that we are "just right" and others telling us we were weak. But that had nothing to do with some sort of cultural membership, but with ourselves. We didn't want to see it, but there were plenty of jocks around who played RPGs and the likes as well. Since we hate to take responsibility, we try to make ourselves part of some greater persecuted group, and THAT IS DANGEROUS!

Are you saying that the promotion of groups as a unit of study inherently breeds systems of exclusivity? If so then holy shit someone else gets it.

This video was going so well for five minutes and I found myself agreeing with it... and then you use Sarkeesian to illustrate a point.
Rabid feminist man-haters are at least as much a part of the problem of sexism as the abhorrent examples you gave earlier, if not more so. In fact the likes of that woman have completely co-opted the ideal of equality between the sexes to the point where I instantly mistrust any woman labeling herself a 'feminist'.

Agreed, Agreed, and Agreed... except for that "one lady who made hella money for her kick starter project" who didn't deliver much except looking at things narrow, and bending the context for her own argument... she were NOT from the game culture, she pretends to be... it's a lie, and we all paid for it to be made... her analysis are shallow and filled with female supremacy all over them, talking as if men are all self imposing- insecure- women fearing- sex fiends... Hell yeah I am offended by her speeches, hell... you should hear her talking about Bayonetta, and compare to your overthink episode...

I respect people who take time overthink things, but in her case, she feeds off other female-superiorisist, moms, anti gaming communities... to De-humanizing gaming as a "male sweating, guns blazing, boob shaking, fap fest", to me, that's sick, like Hitler calling Jews Rats, and rallying up haters everywhere, gathering funding on their crusade out to put people down.

bravetoaster:
Can someone please explain how/why so many self-identifying geeks think they're a special case or hold onto harassment or bullying for more than 10 minutes after being done with school?

Because harassment and bullying often has long-lasting effects, that can affect people for the rest of their lives. It also isn't confined to school. Harassment and bullying is also common in the workplace, and outside the workplace into adult years. The victims of bullying are often at a great disadvantage for employment and other social benefits, because of the personal problems it causes.

There are even plenty of documented cases of bullying and harassment in places like retirement homes and hospitals, where the participants are in the 60+ age range.

Combustion Kevin:

Lono Shrugged:
A persecuted bunch of people attain "power" and choose not to persecute others themselves.

That would be a first in human history Bob...

chaos theory says, it is not only possible...
it is inevitable.

I seriously doubt this one will be it. Also almost anything is possible if given an indefinite time frame. I don't think we will be around long enough...

It's kind of interesting to me because of the parallels seen in the Atheist community, what with the whole feminism-issue and Atheism+ splitting groups apart. In a way, that's not surprising: Not only will Atheism correlate a lot with Geek culture because of certain overlaps (primarily white, male, heterosexual people who tend to be tech-savvy or at least -interested), there's also a lack of mainstream acceptance from others in some places and despite that there's a lack of acceptance towards others among us as well, like women, minorities etc.. I guess that's always a risk with tribalism. You can always find out-groups. And while we'd like to think of ourselves as better than, often we do revert to the same awful behaviours once we are in power, even if just within our localized group/environment.

Monxeroth:
Although the white knighting of anita never stops and has nothing to do with geeks acting like a wounded knee when someone critizes us. Its one of those flawed arguments, logical fallacies that both jim and bob holds, ie, that the only people critical of other peoples criticism towards geek culture are always the "trolls" and the "haters"
when in reality its actual intellectual people pointing out the logical fallacies and flawed arguments of said criticism towards geek culture which is very often the case.

Please show us what on earth you're talking about, because I'd love to see these "actual intellectual people" who feel the need to comment on something like tropes vs women. Because I really doubt it.

Lono Shrugged:

Combustion Kevin:

Lono Shrugged:
A persecuted bunch of people attain "power" and choose not to persecute others themselves.

That would be a first in human history Bob...

chaos theory says, it is not only possible...
it is inevitable.

I seriously doubt this one will be it. Also almost anything is possible if given an indefinite time frame. I don't think we will be around long enough...

that's so pessimistic. ^^

think of it this way: are you an accepting and reasonable human being?
yes.
then keep at it.

are your friends too?
yes.
then things are already looking alright.

Abandon4093:
What the fuck did I just watch?

Is America seriously THAT different from the UK?

Were films like Revenge of the Nerds actually based on real life?

Because over here, you could play Warhammer and Rugby. Get good grades in school and have a good social life.

It was never a one or the other deal, there was no segregation. You just had people that got on and people that didn't. My group of friends had everything from keen sport fanatics to people who Maths enthusiasts. And we all got on fine.

There was no marginalisation based on cliques that to be honest, barely existed past the first year of secondary school.

I just can't relate to this sort of thing. I was never considered an outcast because I liked comics or computers. No one was, even amongst people who didn't share the interests.

Playing board games didn't somehow stop me from playing Sports.

Methinks there might be a little projection occurring in that particular part of the piece. Hell, I grew up in a rural redneck town in Canada, played D&D and Magic in the lunchroom after school with football players. Introversion is often seen by others as marginalization as well, even if it's the individual's choice to do so. Of course when one is crafting arbitrary cultural identities one often pulls from one's experiences. Marginalization for entertainment choices is a driving force of identity for the 'geek culture'; too bad its based on individual experience.

DTWolfwood:
Now that we are on top, the only natural thing for us to do is oppress those that have kept us down!

Sorry human nature :(

except the people we're oppressing haven't kept us down, its other people 'the mainstream' kept down too.

I'm sure this is just a god damn attempt to piss everyone off, he uses the word cis-gendered unironically and says "all intensive purpose".

Stop the internet, I want to get off.

I hope Bob is going to do a follow up addressing the issues that many here in the comments have said already, as it stands now I have lost some respect for him.

Why should we be the ones changing for the mainstream when all they do is steal the parts they see as profitable and then go on and ruin it for all of us. I feel that we have always been rather accepting of others if they showed a genuine interest in our hobbies. Instead what we get are feminists coming in and demanding that we change for THEM and we should adapt to THEIR needs, not even the needs of real girl gamers (they too have been around since the beginning) because from what I read they don't see the problems all these crazy feminists are talking about either.

I am not too involved with geek culture, I like to play MMO's and card/board games and that is where it ends but I do see what the outside influences is doing and I don't like what I see and it is mostly the dumbing down to appeal to the masses that I despise. If that is what "accepting the mainstream" is then please find those greedy profiteers some other sub-culture to rape.

Combustion Kevin:
That's so pessimistic. ^^

think of it this way: are you an accepting and reasonable human being?
yes.
then keep at it.

are your friends too?
yes.
then things are already looking alright.

See the problem there is not just me, well it is, but in a specific way. See I may be accepting and reasonable, but my neighbour might not be. He may think that my insistence we accept reason is unacceptable and unreasonable and I think it unreasonable to not accept my reasons for being reasonable. But! is my reason for him not to accept my reasoning pretty unacceptable?

We are not alright Kevin, we never will be.

I actually think we're starting to see geek culture spread its mainstream wings and actually start calling stuff out. From being the subset giving the middle finger to government spying, making intellectual curiosity cool again (with patron saints Tyson and Nye), to making it known we're not accepting the butter-queen's apology because the issue is she thought casual racism was okay in private to begin with.

There is the issue with being passive-aggressive, but I do love meme photos and the concept of voicing your upset state by mailing cupcakes.

The troll issue is something we've been allowing to fester by just letting them be and muting them. By now we should all know what happens when you expose trolls to the light.

How can we do better when our shit has been hijacked by the mainstream we disassociated ourselves with in the first place ?! and is now used as a fashion accessory and is only popular now coz the mainstream figured out they can make alot of money from us. We have not fucked it and WE should not be the one to shoulder the responsibility coz our culture has been made "mainstream" and the douches that have taken it over are assholes, just as they were before but with a different outfit. most of us did not even want this, we were happy being outside of all the shit and the dumb mainstream which included all the assholes that gave us shit in the past for what we were into or wearing. And now the same pricks that gave us shit are wearing and liking the same shit we did but its ok now coz its mainstream ? FUCK THAT.
Your bitching about the children playing games NOW. Not the current "geeks" and like Orcboyphil pointed out the tiny minority of geeks that are assholes which ive never met either. The problems we have now are from the mainstream assholes. NOT the current population of geeks.
So no Bob i have to disagree.

The problem is that being a "geek" doesn't define your social behavior any more than being a "jock" does. What Bob is talking about is 'moral alignment', and not in the D&D sense. By way of explanation, let's simplify the scale to range from 'total dick' to 'totally not a dick', with various degrees in-between. Collective "geekdom" will have individuals ranging from all degrees on that scale. What unites them is not their moral persuasion but their intellectual and emotional attachment to specific types of entertainment.

It's even more complicated when you consider that myriad of complex issues that make up just one psyche, and that a person's view of their behavior is almost exclusively subjective. The changes Bob wants to see have to happen on an individual level. No mass preference on entertainment will do it.

this for the guy who made "magneto was right?"
Where he say about how he was bulled and is he ever had the chance to make the society that bullied him pay.
Is now saying that because geek culture is in a position of power and influence they should be nice to everyone...

At least be constant

Aardvaarkman:

TheRightToArmBears:
What the dickens are you talking about?

Whilst yes, Metallica and Black Sabbath are widely appreciated outside of the metal community, they're the two biggest metal bands in history, which does not equate to metal or even a subgenre being accepted. When did I say what could and couldn't be metal either? You seem to have completely misunderstood what I was saying.

Well, you obviously didn't express yourself well, because you spoke of popular metal not being considered "metal" by the "real" metal culture. But now you say they are metal. Which means that metal has been accepted by the mainstream.

So, which is it?

I said that metal fans tended to deride it and that it may not be sincere. You've taken to mean as 'it's not metal' despite not being what I said.

Now personally I'm not much of a fan of hair metal or nu-metal (although I am partial to Motley Crue and Papa Roach), but I do consider them metal. However, they're both fairly distinct and share less musically and fashionwise (which matters with regards to mainstream acceptance) with other subgenres. Yes, technically they're metal, but I certainly wouldn't say that hair metal shared the same spirit (you're not going to hear a hair metal band sing about much other than sex or partying, it's considerably more upbeat) and nu-metal owed a lot of mainsream appeal to its rap influences.

This is two very distinct subgenres out of a very wide group, I don't really think it's fair to say that because they were accepted in their time that metal is, especially considering the elements that made them appealing to non-metal fans were pretty atypical.

NeedsaBetterName22:
Or, you know, we could accept the fact that entertainment choices don't necessarily coordinate with personal, social, economic or philosophical viewpoints, and abandon the idea of a 'geek culture' for what it truly is: a pathetic attempt at exclusivity driven by entertainment choice, an obsolete cultural backlash starting in the 80s driven by pseudo-intellectualism and superiority complexes (symptoms that Bob himself has, his rather condescending attacks on those that say, like Transformers films). Ultimately the very concept of a 'gamer' or 'geek' culture is inherently exclusive and driven by the belief that geeks are 'special'.

Honestly, why you'd shackle yourself to such a limiting cultural identity as 'geek' is beyond me. You're an individual for god's sake, your entertainment choices do not grant you some kind of arbitrary responsibility towards a nebulous and mushy concept like 'geek culture', nor does it make you somehow responsible for promoting social progressivism within a certain group.

TL:DR version: Fuck trying fix 'geek culture', it's an inherent promoter of arbitrary exclusivity, whether it be more traditional forms like sexism or racism, or the general intellectual superiority complex many self-described 'geeks' have.

Agreed. Honestly the idea of "geek culture" even being a thing only works if you have a very broad, and yet paradoxically exclusionary, definition of what a "geek" even is. Is it people who like science fiction and/or fantasy? No, that includes too many people who are not geeky in the traditional sense. Is it people who like media that's not mainstream? No, that excludes too much media that is geeky in the traditional sense and includes too much stuff traditional geeks wouldn't like. And so on.

There's no such thing as a "geek". It's not a term that has an objective meaning, and it never was. It's just a word bullies call anyone they don't like. And on the flip side, saying that something isn't geeky is just a way for self-proclaimed geeks to pooh-pooh anything they don't like. Remember when Yahtzee said we should abandon the term "gamer"? I recommend we do the same with "geek".

Great sentiment in the video! Unfortunately, much of geek culture is defined by the underaged who don't know any better (or don't care), or the internet (which affords a level of anonymity that results in stupid behavior).

As the age of the average gamer increases, and becomes more diverse (indeed, nearly half of all gamers are women now), it becomes our job to be better parents and role models.

I think the market has already seen the power of geek culture as discerning consumers (eg: XBONE and DRM). Here's hoping that the culture becomes better all around as it gains influence.

Zombie_Moogle:

While Thunderf00t's videos made rational counterpoints to Sarkeesian's videos...

I agree with your comment as a whole, but I gotta say this part doesn`t feel right. I saw that video and thought that guy was a complete idiot. He kept trying to defend fiction with fiction, claiming things in games justified themselves within the game`s own context. Real world don`t work that way.

OP: I feel what Bob`s saying here, but I think the issue is more broad than suggested. The behavior of exclusion is universal to certain personality types that cross all cultures and sub cultures, and not something unique to geek culture, it`s just taken on a more verbose form due to the dominant culture in question being geekery.

Mostly from personal experience and observation, it always seemed to me that the `dumb jocks` who picked on nerds in years past were never the very best or most popular. The best athletes or most popular kids really had no beef with nerds since they were getting all the satisfaction they needed by actually achieving things and socializing. It was always the second-besters, the mediocre, who would act aggressively towards those they deemed outsiders. They wanted to align themselves with the best, but lacking the talent to do so on their own merits, they lashed out at those who appeared different, perpetuating the class or clique mentality to position themselves on the side they`d like to be on but were unable to earn. The fact that many nerds lumped them all in together as one collective persecuting party just shows the extent of their success in reinforcing the divisions.

Now that nerds are the mainstream, it`s the same thing: the best and brightest will leave well enough alone because they`re able to prove themselves on their own, thus not often feeling like they have something to prove. Those who desire to be better or more interesting, but don`t have the natural talent or work ethic to earn it, create fictional clubs they belong to and rules for exclusion.

We saw it take the form of school-yard bullying in the past, but now it`s the internet age. Because physical strength isn`t required to spit out garbage online - consequence free - in the comfort of your home, there has naturally been a decline in locker stuffing. And because words are being used as fists, anything that can be used to single someone out (race, religion, gender, fruit preference) will be latched onto.

So Bob's lesson of the day is, even if your not a brony, love & tolerate, and be a good example of the positive aspects of geek culture.

An easy task on one count. Those who want to stop all the stuff Bob listed, the best way to do it is by being informed. Learn what you need to understand the problems and then try to resolve them through the general people. DON'T try to solve problems without knowledge or support from those who cause the problems, otherwise you will have a solution that works for you and your group, but doesn't work for the general public.

Sounds a bit impossible, doesn't it? It is. Everyone is different and you can not force somebody to do something without it coming back on you. What you must do as an individual is to be knowledgeable and try to spread that knowledge. Only when everyone is at a high information standpoint, will social problems begin to dissipate.

I've never really believed in the idea of a "Geek culture", so this entire video was a bit lost on me I'm afraid.

To me, "geek" has always been a term of ignorance, because it gets used to lump together different activities, passions and pursuits that share nothing in common except the fact that the "cool crowd" (a term that only has any meaning for teenagers) don't like and/or understand them.

I don't feel any greater connection to people who go larping than I do to people who play tennis. They're both hobbies I don't share and have no interest in. Terming one a "geek" hobby and one a "mainstream" hobby seems childish.

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