FarCry 5 is getting fairly postive reviews

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As much fun as it would be to utterly destroy an extremist American cult there's no way I'm paying $80 for the privilege.
Also fuck season passes and fuck microtransactions.
Basically I'm boycotting AAA games.

jademunky:

RonHiler:

To set the record straight about the micro-transactions. Yes, they are there. No, you don't have to use them. You can get everything in the game (even the premium items) without spending any extra real world dollars, and without excessive in-game grinding (in-game money, contrary to what some are saying, is plentiful in the game). Further, those items which are for sale for silver bars are just reskins of other items you get for in-game money, so they are very much cosmetic (and, to reiterate, can also be bought with in-game money as well, you don't need to spend real money to buy them).

Sorry but why does this count as a "fake" reason for disliking something? It certainly affects how the dev's designed the game and impacts my enjoyment of it.

How so, exactly? Given that you can completely ignore microtransactions entirely, and can still buy those items, how is this affecting your enjoyment of the game?

RonHiler:

jademunky:

RonHiler:

To set the record straight about the micro-transactions. Yes, they are there. No, you don't have to use them. You can get everything in the game (even the premium items) without spending any extra real world dollars, and without excessive in-game grinding (in-game money, contrary to what some are saying, is plentiful in the game). Further, those items which are for sale for silver bars are just reskins of other items you get for in-game money, so they are very much cosmetic (and, to reiterate, can also be bought with in-game money as well, you don't need to spend real money to buy them).

Sorry but why does this count as a "fake" reason for disliking something? It certainly affects how the dev's designed the game and impacts my enjoyment of it.

How so, exactly? Given that you can completely ignore microtransactions entirely, and can still buy those items, how is this affecting your enjoyment of the game?

Because the game's design and general balance will be built around encouraging me to do so. Examples for this being Diablo 3 at launch (what with the real-money auction-house) or Dead Space 3.

I've not played this particular game but I can probably guess how it plays out: Yes, I can get that objectively superior gun or item that expands my inventory slots by spending hours grinding 200 whatevers or I can simply open up my wallet and get it now. Devs will make things just a little extra time-consuming or a little less enjoyable to grind just to encourage you, the player, to pay a little bit extra.

jademunky:

Because the game's design and general balance will be built around encouraging me to do so. Examples for this being Diablo 3 at launch (what with the real-money auction-house) or Dead Space 3.

I've not played this particular game but I can probably guess how it plays out: Yes, I can get that objectively superior gun or item that expands my inventory slots by spending hours grinding 200 whatevers or I can simply open up my wallet and get it now. Devs will make things just a little extra time-consuming or a little less enjoyable to grind just to encourage you, the player, to pay a little bit extra.

Except you're wrong
1) Every single item that can be purchased for real money (in addition to in-game money) is simply a reskin of items that exist as non-premium items (exactly the same stats, just a different look). They are entirely cosmetic. There is nothing balanced around those cosmetic items.
2) I've played something like 8 or 10 hours total, maybe as much as 15. I currently have around $10K (more than enough to buy any single item in the game, including the premium items, which run around $2-3K). And I've bought quite a bit of stuff already (including a couple cars and a helicopter, some of the more spendy items). There is no "200 hour grind". Unless you think playing the game itself is a grind, that's a different argument.

You're jumping to conclusions, probably based on the BS a lot of people have posted in this thread, and what they (AAA publishers in general, Ubisoft in particular) have done in the past. Understandable. But I'm telling you, the micro-transactions in this game are completely ignorable and they won't change the experience a whit.

Honestly, I don't know why they bothered to put them in. Anyone that spends real world money on the items in this game is a fool, IMO.

It's fine if you don't like the game. Not everyone likes every game, and that's cool. But don't blame the micro-transactions. They are changing nothing about the gameplay. Period.

jademunky:

RonHiler:

jademunky:

Sorry but why does this count as a "fake" reason for disliking something? It certainly affects how the dev's designed the game and impacts my enjoyment of it.

How so, exactly? Given that you can completely ignore microtransactions entirely, and can still buy those items, how is this affecting your enjoyment of the game?

Because the game's design and general balance will be built around encouraging me to do so. Examples for this being Diablo 3 at launch (what with the real-money auction-house) or Dead Space 3.

I've not played this particular game but I can probably guess how it plays out: Yes, I can get that objectively superior gun or item that expands my inventory slots by spending hours grinding 200 whatevers or I can simply open up my wallet and get it now. Devs will make things just a little extra time-consuming or a little less enjoyable to grind just to encourage you, the player, to pay a little bit extra.

And you'd be guessing entirely wrong. I've beaten the game, and there's no grind. You unlock stuff by just liberating zones (which you're doing anyway) and by doing side missions. You can't actually use Silver Bars (the premium currency) to get better weapons, except for like, 4, only one of which is actually powerful, none of which are unique except for their paintjob. For nearly every other weapon, you have to play the game, because you can't buy them (with cash or bars) until you get enough Resistance Points by playing the game.

Other than that, Silver Bars can only be used for outfits and skins. And everything you can buy with them, you can buy with in-game cash. Cash you'll be swimming in by the end game if you just explore, hunt and fish a bit.

There's bad things with the game: the out-of-left-field ending, the pitiful weapon variety, the unbalanced vehicles. But the premium currency? The poster above me is right: I've no idea why they put them in at all.

RonHiler:

jademunky:

Because the game's design and general balance will be built around encouraging me to do so. Examples for this being Diablo 3 at launch (what with the real-money auction-house) or Dead Space 3.

I've not played this particular game but I can probably guess how it plays out: Yes, I can get that objectively superior gun or item that expands my inventory slots by spending hours grinding 200 whatevers or I can simply open up my wallet and get it now. Devs will make things just a little extra time-consuming or a little less enjoyable to grind just to encourage you, the player, to pay a little bit extra.

Except you're wrong
1) Every single item that can be purchased for real money (in addition to in-game money) is simply a reskin of items that exist as non-premium items (exactly the same stats, just a different look). They are entirely cosmetic. There is nothing balanced around those cosmetic items.
2) I've played something like 8 or 10 hours total, maybe as much as 15. I currently have around $10K (more than enough to buy any single item in the game, including the premium items, which run around $2-3K). And I've bought quite a bit of stuff already (including a couple cars and a helicopter, some of the more spendy items). There is no "200 hour grind". Unless you think playing the game itself is a grind, that's a different argument.

You're jumping to conclusions, probably based on the BS a lot of people have posted in this thread, and what they (AAA publishers in general, Ubisoft in particular) have done in the past. Understandable. But I'm telling you, the micro-transactions in this game are completely ignorable and they won't change the experience a whit.

Honestly, I don't know why they bothered to put them in. Anyone that spends real world money on the items in this game is a fool, IMO.

It's fine if you don't like the game. Not everyone likes every game, and that's cool. But don't blame the micro-transactions. They are changing nothing about the gameplay. Period.

I see. Alright, fair enough, I have judged Ubisoft too harshly. They do seem a far better bunch than EA or Activision.

As to why they even bothered to include them at all (which TheFinish also mentioned), it has been argued by some people that it allows a tiny amount of very-rich people to subsidize gaming for the rest of us. This is then passed off as an explaination for why the industry was oh-so-gracious in never raising the base price of the games.

jademunky:

I see. Alright, fair enough, I have judged Ubisoft too harshly. They do seem a far better bunch than EA or Activision.

As to why they even bothered to include them at all (which TheFinish also mentioned), it has been argued by some people that it allows a tiny amount of very-rich people to subsidize gaming for the rest of us. This is then passed off as an explaination for why the industry was oh-so-gracious in never raising the base price of the games.

As good an explanation as any :) I honestly don't know. Maybe they just thought they needed them because every other game has them?

I do agree with you, badly done micro-transactions can ruin an otherwise good game. Any game that balances around forced micro-transaction items goes directly on my no-play list.

RonHiler:

To set the record straight about the micro-transactions. Yes, they are there. No, you don't have to use them. You can get everything in the game (even the premium items) without spending any extra real world dollars, and without excessive in-game grinding (in-game money, contrary to what some are saying, is plentiful in the game). Further, those items which are for sale for silver bars are just reskins of other items you get for in-game money, so they are very much cosmetic (and, to reiterate, can also be bought with in-game money as well, you don't need to spend real money to buy them).

Doesn't change anything. They still put microtransactions in the game so they can still take those microtrnasactions and shove them someplace unpleasant.

RonHiler:

It's fine if you don't like the game. Not everyone likes every game, and that's cool. But don't blame the micro-transactions. They are changing nothing about the gameplay. Period.

There's the potential "Yet" attached to that statement. Or an "Anymore" thats similarly feasible.

They went out of their way to add a system for buying the stuff with real money, so out of their way as to embed an online store page into a offline (for many) campaign mode.

So either there was a backpedal, note that they hastily threw out the "Only cosmetics" line, which has been the quick standard fallback post-Battlefront 2, even though that's blatantly an actual lie in this case.

Or there's the future case. Which is hypothetical, but Ubisoft has been dabbling in that for awhile now. Anytime they open their mouth to investors, or in business interviews outside their games, they are constantly banging on about wanting games as long-running service platforms. They added microtransactions onto Ghost Recon post-release already, and Rainbow Six (or tried, I've heard some of that one got walked back to). There's reason to be skeptical of the game, when they've already shown a trend towards messing with this stuff post-release, and the framework literally is already there in the game.

Seth Carter:

RonHiler:

It's fine if you don't like the game. Not everyone likes every game, and that's cool. But don't blame the micro-transactions. They are changing nothing about the gameplay. Period.

There's the potential "Yet" attached to that statement. Or an "Anymore" thats similarly feasible.

Okay...yes. There's the potential they could patch in something that breaks the balance. True of any game, micro-transactions or not. Does that mean you are going to stop playing games because of what "might" happen? I'm really not sure I see what your point is here.

So either there was a backpedal, note that they hastily threw out the "Only cosmetics" line, which has been the quick standard fallback post-Battlefront 2, even though that's blatantly an actual lie in this case.

What's the blatant lie? I don't see it.

RonHiler:

Seth Carter:

RonHiler:

It's fine if you don't like the game. Not everyone likes every game, and that's cool. But don't blame the micro-transactions. They are changing nothing about the gameplay. Period.

There's the potential "Yet" attached to that statement. Or an "Anymore" thats similarly feasible.

Okay...yes. There's the potential they could patch in something that breaks the balance. True of any game, micro-transactions or not. Does that mean you are going to stop playing games because of what "might" happen? I'm really not sure I see what your point is here.

So either there was a backpedal, note that they hastily threw out the "Only cosmetics" line, which has been the quick standard fallback post-Battlefront 2, even though that's blatantly an actual lie in this case.

What's the blatant lie? I don't see it.

"Cosmetics only". You can probably even find the thread on it down the page here a bit. It was kind of obvious, since they added on a comment about xp boosters or something immediately.

Yes, any game could hypothetically be patched to do whatever. But not every game comes from a developer who's stated intent (over and over) to do so, actually done so with their other games, and not every game already has the framework to do so embedded in its default version. There's even contrast to other Ubisoft games. AC : Origins and Child of Light both had similar inconsequential micro-transactions, but they didn't have a second currency set up, or the store page embedded into the regular gameplay.

Seth Carter:

RonHiler:

Seth Carter:

There's the potential "Yet" attached to that statement. Or an "Anymore" thats similarly feasible.

Okay...yes. There's the potential they could patch in something that breaks the balance. True of any game, micro-transactions or not. Does that mean you are going to stop playing games because of what "might" happen? I'm really not sure I see what your point is here.

So either there was a backpedal, note that they hastily threw out the "Only cosmetics" line, which has been the quick standard fallback post-Battlefront 2, even though that's blatantly an actual lie in this case.

What's the blatant lie? I don't see it.

"Cosmetics only". You can probably even find the thread on it down the page here a bit. It was kind of obvious, since they added on a comment about xp boosters or something immediately.

Yes, any game could hypothetically be patched to do whatever. But not every game comes from a developer who's stated intent (over and over) to do so, actually done so with their other games, and not every game already has the framework to do so embedded in its default version. There's even contrast to other Ubisoft games. AC : Origins and Child of Light both had similar inconsequential micro-transactions, but they didn't have a second currency set up, or the store page embedded into the regular gameplay.

Uh, what? AC:Origins definitely has a second currency (Helix Credits) set up, and the store page, while not embedded into regular gameplay (by which I think you mean, when you open in-game stores?) is far from unobstrusive. And it was like this from day one. And unlike FC5, AC:O has actual grind, because you need materials for all your upgrades, which does incentivise you to spend real money to bypass it (although the free Helix Credits you get are enough to get quite a few resource timesavers).

Also, you can find Silver Bars in the game world in FC5. Enough for a few guns/outfits/skins. So there's that too.

Also, I don't know about Rainbow Six: Siege, but the microtransactions in Ghost Recon are basically in the same ball park as FC5: completely unneeded to the point I don't even know why they're in there.

TheFinish:

Seth Carter:

RonHiler:

Okay...yes. There's the potential they could patch in something that breaks the balance. True of any game, micro-transactions or not. Does that mean you are going to stop playing games because of what "might" happen? I'm really not sure I see what your point is here.

What's the blatant lie? I don't see it.

"Cosmetics only". You can probably even find the thread on it down the page here a bit. It was kind of obvious, since they added on a comment about xp boosters or something immediately.

Yes, any game could hypothetically be patched to do whatever. But not every game comes from a developer who's stated intent (over and over) to do so, actually done so with their other games, and not every game already has the framework to do so embedded in its default version. There's even contrast to other Ubisoft games. AC : Origins and Child of Light both had similar inconsequential micro-transactions, but they didn't have a second currency set up, or the store page embedded into the regular gameplay.

Uh, what? AC:Origins definitely has a second currency (Helix Credits) set up, and the store page, while not embedded into regular gameplay (by which I think you mean, when you open in-game stores?) is far from unobstrusive. And it was like this from day one. And unlike FC5, AC:O has actual grind, because you need materials for all your upgrades, which does incentivise you to spend real money to bypass it (although the free Helix Credits you get are enough to get quite a few resource timesavers).

Also, you can find Silver Bars in the game world in FC5. Enough for a few guns/outfits/skins. So there's that too.

Also, I don't know about Rainbow Six: Siege, but the microtransactions in Ghost Recon are basically in the same ball park as FC5: completely unneeded to the point I don't even know why they're in there.

You're right, the store page (which is a separate tab you have no reason to ever go to in the regular course of gameplay, unlike Far Cry 5's that you have to open to perform the ingame transactions) does use "Helix Credits". I'd forgotten since I never had reason to touch it. Far CRy has grinding for guns, Origins has grinding for upgrades. Prior Far Cry's also did grinding for guns (and levels, and the garbage fire hunting mechanics for pouches). Notably in Origins though, there was no weird overlay of the Helix stuff into the game proper. Bayek didn't go to blacksmith and have the option to pay him in Helix credits instead of drachmas flashed up on the screen next to the drachma price.

(Don't mistake the use as an example for an endorsement of Origins either. I wouldn't have touched that one either if it hadn't been given to me. And has all the Ubisoft usuals of too much space, not enough ideas, and not enough work or talent on the ideas it does have)

Seth Carter:

"Cosmetics only". You can probably even find the thread on it down the page here a bit. It was kind of obvious, since they added on a comment about xp boosters or something immediately.

You're going to have to be more specific. As far as I can tell (and I've played the game) every premium item is entirely cosmetic. So I'm not sure what you are referring to as being a blatant lie.

Yes, any game could hypothetically be patched to do whatever. But not every game comes from a developer who's stated intent (over and over) to do so, actually done so with their other games, and not every game already has the framework to do so embedded in its default version. There's even contrast to other Ubisoft games. AC : Origins and Child of Light both had similar inconsequential micro-transactions, but they didn't have a second currency set up, or the store page embedded into the regular gameplay.

So you don't like the developer/publisher. Okay, that's a fair argument, I can respect that. However, this particular game (developer/publisher aside) does not have intrusive micro-transactions, so I think it's unfair to paint it as evil with that particular brush. Maybe it will in the future, who knows? But right now I can play it and have a good time and not have to buy a single thing with real money (beyond the initial $60-100 price tag) and still get every item in the game, including the premium ones.

I beat the game AMA

Seth Carter:

TheFinish:

Seth Carter:

"Cosmetics only". You can probably even find the thread on it down the page here a bit. It was kind of obvious, since they added on a comment about xp boosters or something immediately.

Yes, any game could hypothetically be patched to do whatever. But not every game comes from a developer who's stated intent (over and over) to do so, actually done so with their other games, and not every game already has the framework to do so embedded in its default version. There's even contrast to other Ubisoft games. AC : Origins and Child of Light both had similar inconsequential micro-transactions, but they didn't have a second currency set up, or the store page embedded into the regular gameplay.

Uh, what? AC:Origins definitely has a second currency (Helix Credits) set up, and the store page, while not embedded into regular gameplay (by which I think you mean, when you open in-game stores?) is far from unobstrusive. And it was like this from day one. And unlike FC5, AC:O has actual grind, because you need materials for all your upgrades, which does incentivise you to spend real money to bypass it (although the free Helix Credits you get are enough to get quite a few resource timesavers).

Also, you can find Silver Bars in the game world in FC5. Enough for a few guns/outfits/skins. So there's that too.

Also, I don't know about Rainbow Six: Siege, but the microtransactions in Ghost Recon are basically in the same ball park as FC5: completely unneeded to the point I don't even know why they're in there.

You're right, the store page (which is a separate tab you have no reason to ever go to in the regular course of gameplay, unlike Far Cry 5's that you have to open to perform the ingame transactions) does use "Helix Credits". I'd forgotten since I never had reason to touch it. Far CRy has grinding for guns, Origins has grinding for upgrades. Prior Far Cry's also did grinding for guns (and levels, and the garbage fire hunting mechanics for pouches). Notably in Origins though, there was no weird overlay of the Helix stuff into the game proper. Bayek didn't go to blacksmith and have the option to pay him in Helix credits instead of drachmas flashed up on the screen next to the drachma price.

(Don't mistake the use as an example for an endorsement of Origins either. I wouldn't have touched that one either if it hadn't been given to me. And has all the Ubisoft usuals of too much space, not enough ideas, and not enough work or talent on the ideas it does have)

Far Cry 5 doesn't have grinding for guns. Guns are unlocked in the shop when you reach certain Resistance Point thresholds in the zones you can liberate (each Zone has 3 Points, so there's 9 total. You have gun unlocks for each point, but the big one comes at 5 Points, aka mid game). And the way to reach those thresholds is just to play the game, mostly doing story/side missions and outposts. So, you know, I don't have to stop playing the game for twenty minutes to go hunt down tapirs to have a bigger ammo pouch or whatever.

And even if we consider "playing the game" to be grinding (instead of just a progression system), you're still wrong because guess what? You can't actually use Silver to buy any of the guns you unlock. It's all in-game cash. And there's no way to turn Silver into in-game cash either. You can only buy 5 weapons with silver :a shovel, a .50 cal sniper, an m79 grenade launcher, the game's AR-knockoff and a 1911. Only the sniper and the grenade launcher aren't available from the start to your character anyway, and it's not a gigantic power boost (particularly because the ammo for them is expensive, which paradoxically would mean you have to grind hunting animals for money if you want to use them regularly).

This is what I meant when I said I've no idea why they've put them in the game in the first place. There's no incentive to spend real money in the game, since you can't get tangible power boosts from it and everything else you can get by just playing. It took me about 35 hours to finish the game (except for a few collectathon missions) and I unlocked every gun/vehicle/outfit I was interested in, and I still have 20,000 in-game cash to unlock more stuff if I wanted to.

TheFinish:

This is what I meant when I said I've no idea why they've put them in the game in the first place.

Because big name publishers require their developers to put some form of microtransactions into their games.

So frankly, I'd rather developers put in microtransactions that don't even factor into the game, just to satisfy a contract, than to do something stupid like SW Battlefront 2

TheFinish:

Seth Carter:

TheFinish:

Uh, what? AC:Origins definitely has a second currency (Helix Credits) set up, and the store page, while not embedded into regular gameplay (by which I think you mean, when you open in-game stores?) is far from unobstrusive. And it was like this from day one. And unlike FC5, AC:O has actual grind, because you need materials for all your upgrades, which does incentivise you to spend real money to bypass it (although the free Helix Credits you get are enough to get quite a few resource timesavers).

Also, you can find Silver Bars in the game world in FC5. Enough for a few guns/outfits/skins. So there's that too.

Also, I don't know about Rainbow Six: Siege, but the microtransactions in Ghost Recon are basically in the same ball park as FC5: completely unneeded to the point I don't even know why they're in there.

You're right, the store page (which is a separate tab you have no reason to ever go to in the regular course of gameplay, unlike Far Cry 5's that you have to open to perform the ingame transactions) does use "Helix Credits". I'd forgotten since I never had reason to touch it. Far CRy has grinding for guns, Origins has grinding for upgrades. Prior Far Cry's also did grinding for guns (and levels, and the garbage fire hunting mechanics for pouches). Notably in Origins though, there was no weird overlay of the Helix stuff into the game proper. Bayek didn't go to blacksmith and have the option to pay him in Helix credits instead of drachmas flashed up on the screen next to the drachma price.

(Don't mistake the use as an example for an endorsement of Origins either. I wouldn't have touched that one either if it hadn't been given to me. And has all the Ubisoft usuals of too much space, not enough ideas, and not enough work or talent on the ideas it does have)

Far Cry 5 doesn't have grinding for guns. Guns are unlocked in the shop when you reach certain Resistance Point thresholds in the zones you can liberate (each Zone has 3 Points, so there's 9 total. You have gun unlocks for each point, but the big one comes at 5 Points, aka mid game). And the way to reach those thresholds is just to play the game, mostly doing story/side missions and outposts. So, you know, I don't have to stop playing the game for twenty minutes to go hunt down tapirs to have a bigger ammo pouch or whatever.

And even if we consider "playing the game" to be grinding (instead of just a progression system), you're still wrong because guess what? You can't actually use Silver to buy any of the guns you unlock. It's all in-game cash. And there's no way to turn Silver into in-game cash either. You can only buy 5 weapons with silver :a shovel, a .50 cal sniper, an m79 grenade launcher, the game's AR-knockoff and a 1911. Only the sniper and the grenade launcher aren't available from the start to your character anyway, and it's not a gigantic power boost (particularly because the ammo for them is expensive, which paradoxically would mean you have to grind hunting animals for money if you want to use them regularly).

This is what I meant when I said I've no idea why they've put them in the game in the first place. There's no incentive to spend real money in the game, since you can't get tangible power boosts from it and everything else you can get by just playing. It took me about 35 hours to finish the game (except for a few collectathon missions) and I unlocked every gun/vehicle/outfit I was interested in, and I still have 20,000 in-game cash to unlock more stuff if I wanted to.

The special tab aren't the only guns you buy with silver. If you look under the other tabs at the bottom, each category has additional late game guns that can be unlocked with silver. Notably, the SPAS-12, an AK-MS (2 different ones in fact), a different 1911, an LMG, as well as a premium flamethrower.

The main incentive for buying silver would be getting those guns at the very beginning of the game, though given you can still buy them with cash and how easy cash is to get, I would agree the ability to buy silver seems largely pointless.

I've been playing the game for about 12 hours and I've been able to buy several ''premium'' weapons and outfits, I don't even know why they put microtransactions in the game when you can easily just play and buy them with the in-game currency. Might be in their contracts like previously mentioned but it still makes no sense to buy skins for a singleplayer game that you can easily get by just playing it normally.

BabyfartsMcgeezaks:
but it still makes no sense to buy skins for a singleplayer game that you can easily get by just playing it normally.

Honestly, elephant in the room, it doesn't make sense to buy clothes for a first person game to begin with. Especially since far cry games keep the first person perspective in cutscenes.

But I admit I have enjoyed playing dress up

undeadsuitor:

BabyfartsMcgeezaks:
but it still makes no sense to buy skins for a singleplayer game that you can easily get by just playing it normally.

Honestly, elephant in the room, it doesn't make sense to buy clothes for a first person game to begin with. Especially since far cry games keep the first person perspective in cutscenes.

But I admit I have enjoyed playing dress up

Well it's got more oomph now because there's co-op, so your buddy can see your dress up, but yeah. Although, you can see your pants and boots if you look down!

EDIT: And your gloves!

Kyrian007:
I'm getting it. I really just like the idea of a Far Cry in a setting like the area where I live, virtually killing survivalist/cultist assholes like the ones that infest the area where I live. I won't buy on day 1, I don't give any AAA release a buy on day 1 just on principle. Those release day sales are an important metric for publishers so that's my vote against the publisher. But I imagine I'll pick it up a week or so later. I may even buy it on Uplay as opposed to Steam just so I don't have to run 2 frontends.

True. I'd heard someone mention something similar about the game's setting. He mentioned how it seemed underwhelming at first that this was taking place in a familiar, non-exotic setting, but then went on to say how the fact that it was familiar, helped to emphasize that something wasn't right here. No one bats an eye at seeing a war breaking out in a place like Kirat, but here in the US, especially among the American player base, there's something charmingly unsettling about seeing this stuff happening.

BabyfartsMcgeezaks:
I've been playing the game for about 12 hours and I've been able to buy several ''premium'' weapons and outfits, I don't even know why they put microtransactions in the game when you can easily just play and buy them with the in-game currency. Might be in their contracts like previously mentioned but it still makes no sense to buy skins for a singleplayer game that you can easily get by just playing it normally.

They just melded it into their design philosophy at some point. IIRC, Watch_Dogs 1 was the originating instance for the clothing stuff (which was a bit weird considering other people don't even see your avatar in the multiplayer, you show up as a random NPC).

Ubisoft themselves refers to The Division as their milestone point for adopting "Games as Service" and their open world design template, which probably includes the microtransactions. Of course, an online MMO thing vaguely can (hypothetically) justify such things existing, its when you copy-paste that template into your self-contained games that don't involve running servers and ongoing content creation continuously it starts becoming more questionable.

This is the nature of the design template of course. They'll paste microtransactiosn onto products where they make no sense to exist the same way they pasted truck hijacking missions into Watch_Dogs 2 or AC : Origins. There's abberations in the template occasionally (Both Watch_Dogs for whatever reason completely eschews the regional influence thing), but they'll plop most of it down in the game somehow.

The "Games as Service" model dumped on what should be full package experiences is the other main reason for Ubi's recent spat of games to rot unless one's bored and finds a used copy. They're making platforms consisting of barely-altered copy paste jobs across a map at this point. So they can have people come back every week/month/quarter for some drip feed of possible innovation. What they intend to do with people logging into these games continuously is a bit nebulous. Watch_Dogs 2 they dumped out co-op missions as a DLC pack, and Ghost Recon did the same thing with the PvP mode. So I'd say they're sitll mucking about with models, and probably had to scramble some stuff because of the BF2 scandal (and their own Rainbow Six one).

Massive Spoilers Ahead. Warning!

So the ending to Far Cry 5 is getting a bit of hate, but also a bit of the Mass Effect 3 Indoctrination theory as there is a bunch of in-game evidence, including the in the endings themselves, to indicate the given endings aren't actually real.

So my cousin bought me Far Cry 5 (well he bought himself Far Cry 5, but game sharing).

Microtransactions = Not as ridiculous as hyped up. Still stupid. And yes, the ingame shop you have to use to refill your ammo all the time or spawn a car having a lagtime to open it because its connecting to an online store is irritating.

Onto actual impressions of the game.

Weird lag effects? Bugs? Glitches? There's a myriad of these that I don't know how to typify. I've played FC 3, 4, and Blood Dragon. Fire didn't catch you on fire like you were wearing clothes soaked in gasoline from 7 or 8 feet away before. The health meter (besides being pathetically low-visibility in the UI, also seems to have some weird crap going on with it. Frequently it drops to 0 and you can still take multiple hits after. Other times its "nope bang you're dead" before the medkit prompt for being injured even pops up. The new protagonist also seems drastically more fragile then in prior games, and no longer has the old "first aid" ability where they recovered slower but could still heal themselves. They do instead regenerate health, but only sometimes (out of combat? Dunno, its not explained)

Open world. The open world likes to go nuts. Completely at random. NPC's just screaming at random invisible enemies that don't exist. Spawning in nonsensical places (I was almost decapitated by two rebels spawning in vision of me and coming straight at me on an ATV in the desolate middle of a forest at one point). Hell, you can be shopping at the garage in a friendly outpost only to have the NPCs suddenly decide you're a hostile and start shooting you.

Speaking of random shit impairing the games functionality on a basic level. Besides the screaming at the shadows psychotic breakdowns some of the NPCs have that counts as "in conflict" so you can't talk to them. Someone at Far Cry 5 looked at skyrim's dragons and said "Hold my beer". Fun little cultist planes that shoot at you and drop bombs spawn constantly, and continue to hover around even while chattering on the radio that they can't find you. This has a myriad of neat effects like making any NPC qest nearby unusuable cause they're "in conflict", meaning if you step out at all they call reinforcements to you, and if you get in a vehicle you're basically dead from a one-hit bomb or a machine gun that sets your vehicle on fire (And your gas soaked rag clothing with it, so you die from that even if the bullets don't get you). You can kill these planes, but they seem to be impervious to all but the two most expensive weapons to use (including surviving 3 remote bombs attached to them), which'd almost make sense if they did have you buying ammo with micro-money.

For another general s*** in your open world experience corn flakes, doing stuff triggers you being "marked" by the cult. Whereupon some crazy stuff spawns out of nowhere at you and shoots you with laser-accurate insta-KO bullets so you can go visit their evil-meme spewing villain of the moment for a few minutes of being jabbered at before your invariable escape (hell, half the time they let you or force you to leave).

Also, to pad out the leveling system all the guns have obnoxious bloom (giant circles where your bullets go randomly around the spot you actually aim, for the layman) so you can take perks later to reduce it. Speaking of wasting ammo and artificial money sinks, those little forced captue segments also eat all your ammo, forcing you to rebuy it after.

Silentpony:
I'm thinking about this one. It looks fun enough, and who doesn't like killing cultists? The Inquisitor in me approves. Not a huge fan of season passes, even if some of the DLC campaigns look fun, and super not a big fan of the apparent grind. Enemies drop like $5-8 of in-game currency, and a new gun is like $7000+ to get, unless you spring for microtransactions.

Still, if its on sale in a few months, and they patch in a better economy, I'll probably get this one.

Ridiculous AR-15s and most guns don't cost that much in real America. (Which itself is a pretty big problem)

Gergar12:
Ridiculous AR-15s and most guns don't cost that much in real America. (Which itself is a pretty big problem)

It might seem a bit odd price wise, but as with most things in the game, by the time you're actually allowed to buy it, you can afford it. It is weird though, I'm pretty sure my attack helicopter cost less than my AK.

EDIT: Actually, I'm talking shit. The standard AK was probably about the 3 mark IIRC. Most of the guns are in the $1k to 3K range

Zykon TheLich:

It might seem a bit odd price wise, but as with most things in the game, by the time you're actually allowed to buy it, you can afford it. It is weird though, I'm pretty sure my attack helicopter cost less than my AK.

It is also only the prestige weapons that cost 7,200 dollars in game. The regular guns come in between 1,200 and 4,800 (for the guided rocket launcher), with assault rifles and sniper rifles between 2-3,000. The prestige weapons are essentially a "I don't want to wait for the unlock and want to pay extra to get the gun right now", as they are not different from the regular gun in any way short of their unique skin and the ability to buy them with silver bars (the premium currency, also found in abundance in the game and as rewards for challenges).

I've got several gripes with Far Cry 5, mostly concerning the way the story gets in the way of the gameplay and how rushed the story feels, but the economy is not one of them. In fact, the in-game economy seems tuned to let the player make meaningful choices early on, while giving you plenty of chances to unlock things just for the sake of trying them out.

Seth Carter:
Speaking of wasting ammo and artificial money sinks, those little forced captue segments also eat all your ammo, forcing you to rebuy it after.

Buying ammo is almost always pointless, unless you want the special ammo. Pretty much every outpost you liberate and most buildings in the game world have respawning stacks of ammo laying around. If you know where to go, there are also respawning ammo crates easily available. Once you realize that, you'll never buy ammo again for any other reason but that you are lazy and swimming in cash (which I did by the end of the game).

Gethsemani:

Zykon TheLich:

It might seem a bit odd price wise, but as with most things in the game, by the time you're actually allowed to buy it, you can afford it. It is weird though, I'm pretty sure my attack helicopter cost less than my AK.

It is also only the prestige weapons that cost 7,200 dollars in game. The regular guns come in between 1,200 and 4,800 (for the guided rocket launcher), with assault rifles and sniper rifles between 2-3,000. The prestige weapons are essentially a "I don't want to wait for the unlock and want to pay extra to get the gun right now", as they are not different from the regular gun in any way short of their unique skin and the ability to buy them with silver bars (the premium currency, also found in abundance in the game and as rewards for challenges).

Now...you see that's what happens when you turn on Farcry 5 to check how much things cost, start to edit your answer and then decide you'll play for just a few more minutes...

You can retrieve arrows from dead bodies, so a good tip is you never have to buy ammo if you never miss your shots with a bow B))

Sooo...Played it a bunch today.

Yeah, it's pretty good. I really do feel like it's one step forward one step back from 3 though.

3 had the exotic locale and running into the jungle felt really risky because you never knew if the puddle you were escaping into might have a hungry croc in there somewhere, and the wacky shaman-ish stuff was pretty cool.

5 loses that...However, it has a hilariously awesome megatruck and honest to god party members who are actually worth a damn, even the randos you can pick up. I also do appreciate actually feeling like I'm being hunted down, even if the end result feels kiiiinda cheesy and I'd kinda prefer to have it happen mid-mission a-la-Farcry-3.

...And apparently it's possible to stick a silencer on a shotgun. I haven't done so just yet, but holy crap I think I wanna give that a shot.

Overall, enjoying it so far, now that I finally have a second primary weapon slot and a silencer for my pistol.

I really wish Farcry games would stop trying to sell us on the idea that we're the everyman, the rookie, the hapless traveller, being thrown into these situations.

It's such a huge disconnect when the game portrays the player character as out of their depth and on the run, only to shift to player control where we proceed to murder everyone and everything without hesitation or problem.

Elijin:
I really wish Farcry games would stop trying to sell us on the idea that we're the everyman, the rookie, the hapless traveller, being thrown into these situations.

It's such a huge disconnect when the game portrays the player character as out of their depth and on the run, only to shift to player control where we proceed to murder everyone and everything without hesitation or problem.

Yeah it is weird. I like to imagine Deputy whatshisorherface is some kind of veteran or extreme gun nut or an FBI plant or something.

Jason Brody.....I got nothin'. I mean, there's a theory that there's a sap on all the jungle plants that makes people insanely violent if you get it on your skin (which explains the highly aggressive animals) and since Brody spends all his time in the bushes... Even so, going from Inexperienced Tourist to Greatest Warrior Alive when the local gun toting yahoos aren't able to hack it was just silly as fuck. XD

aegix drakan:

Elijin:
I really wish Farcry games would stop trying to sell us on the idea that we're the everyman, the rookie, the hapless traveller, being thrown into these situations.

It's such a huge disconnect when the game portrays the player character as out of their depth and on the run, only to shift to player control where we proceed to murder everyone and everything without hesitation or problem.

Yeah it is weird. I like to imagine Deputy whatshisorherface is some kind of veteran or extreme gun nut or an FBI plant or something.

Jason Brody.....I got nothin'. I mean, there's a theory that there's a sap on all the jungle plants that makes people insanely violent if you get it on your skin (which explains the highly aggressive animals) and since Brody spends all his time in the bushes... Even so, going from Inexperienced Tourist to Greatest Warrior Alive when the local gun toting yahoos aren't able to hack it was just silly as fuck. XD

At least in FarCry Primal you were a hunter:

image

aegix drakan:

Elijin:
I really wish Farcry games would stop trying to sell us on the idea that we're the everyman, the rookie, the hapless traveller, being thrown into these situations.

It's such a huge disconnect when the game portrays the player character as out of their depth and on the run, only to shift to player control where we proceed to murder everyone and everything without hesitation or problem.

Yeah it is weird. I like to imagine Deputy whatshisorherface is some kind of veteran or extreme gun nut or an FBI plant or something.

Jason Brody.....I got nothin'. I mean, there's a theory that there's a sap on all the jungle plants that makes people insanely violent if you get it on your skin (which explains the highly aggressive animals) and since Brody spends all his time in the bushes... Even so, going from Inexperienced Tourist to Greatest Warrior Alive when the local gun toting yahoos aren't able to hack it was just silly as fuck. XD

At least Jason is presented as having an arc - he's properly scared/horrified/weirded/enthused/dead serious at each stop of his journey, improbable as it may be. Ajay from FC4 on the other hand is presented in the most matter of fact way possible and there's no attempt at characterization.

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