Review: BlazBlue: Calamity Trigger

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CantFaketheFunk:

Dammit Daisuke Ishiwatari, what are you on?

That is not a question to which we are permitted to know the answer.
Just revel in the amazement that is the world's greatest game developer / musical composer (I usually leave 'Awe of She' on repeat on my laptop before I sleep at night).

As a huge fan of the Guilty Gear games besides Accent Core which ruined my keepaway game with Axl, I must admit to being intrigued.

...

Okay, okay, so I'm actually chomping at the bit to get this game somehow, but I try to restrain myself. Else I'll wake up one day in an Atlantic City alleyway clutching a bloodstained PS3 and with no memory of what happened.

WhiteTigerShiro:
The thing I love about this game is the same thing I love about the Street Fighter games, as it lacks one of the things I loathe about Soul Calibre. It has a simple moves list that you can learn fairly quickly so that you can focus more on practicing your timing and how to combo moves together. Unlike with Soul Calibre where every character's moves list is akin to an encyclopaedia, and if even one of those moves can't be recalled at the top of your head in the heat of battle, then you're going to miss-out on a key advantage to work around your opponent's attack (or defense).

I think you're mixing up Soul Calibur with Tekken. All you need in Soul Calibur is the basic stuff (press a direction and an attack button); in Tekken, you press a direction or two or three and hit the attack buttons corresponding to whatever limbs you think the move is going to use.

NeutralDrow:

WhiteTigerShiro:
The thing I love about this game is the same thing I love about the Street Fighter games, as it lacks one of the things I loathe about Soul Calibre. It has a simple moves list that you can learn fairly quickly so that you can focus more on practicing your timing and how to combo moves together. Unlike with Soul Calibre where every character's moves list is akin to an encyclopaedia, and if even one of those moves can't be recalled at the top of your head in the heat of battle, then you're going to miss-out on a key advantage to work around your opponent's attack (or defense).

I think you're mixing up Soul Calibur with Tekken. All you need in Soul Calibur is the basic stuff (press a direction and an attack button); in Tekken, you press a direction or two or three and hit the attack buttons corresponding to whatever limbs you think the move is going to use.

Yeah, Tekken was pretty bad about it too as I recall, but Soul Calibur is also terrible about it. It's a really easy game to button-mash, sure, but when you're as good as some of my friends, you need to really know how your character works. Which means memorizing an encyclopaedia of moves.

Gregorius:

CantFaketheFunk:

Dammit Daisuke Ishiwatari, what are you on?

That is not a question to which we are permitted to know the answer.

Why aren't we permitted to know? Is it some kind of super-drug? Or is it the essence of creativity itself?

Beowulf DW:

Gregorius:

CantFaketheFunk:

Dammit Daisuke Ishiwatari, what are you on?

That is not a question to which we are permitted to know the answer.

Why aren't we permitted to know? Is it some kind of super-drug? Or is it the essence of creativity itself?

My theory is that it's all because of his awesome hair. The beard helps sometimes too.

image

Arisato-kun:

Beowulf DW:

Gregorius:

CantFaketheFunk:

Dammit Daisuke Ishiwatari, what are you on?

That is not a question to which we are permitted to know the answer.

Why aren't we permitted to know? Is it some kind of super-drug? Or is it the essence of creativity itself?

My theory is that it's all because of his awesome hair. The beard helps sometimes too.

image

Daaamn... that is some awesome hair... I'm jealous now...

WhiteTigerShiro:

NeutralDrow:

WhiteTigerShiro:
The thing I love about this game is the same thing I love about the Street Fighter games, as it lacks one of the things I loathe about Soul Calibre. It has a simple moves list that you can learn fairly quickly so that you can focus more on practicing your timing and how to combo moves together. Unlike with Soul Calibre where every character's moves list is akin to an encyclopaedia, and if even one of those moves can't be recalled at the top of your head in the heat of battle, then you're going to miss-out on a key advantage to work around your opponent's attack (or defense).

I think you're mixing up Soul Calibur with Tekken. All you need in Soul Calibur is the basic stuff (press a direction and an attack button); in Tekken, you press a direction or two or three and hit the attack buttons corresponding to whatever limbs you think the move is going to use.

Yeah, Tekken was pretty bad about it too as I recall, but Soul Calibur is also terrible about it. It's a really easy game to button-mash, sure, but when you're as good as some of my friends, you need to really know how your character works. Which means memorizing an encyclopaedia of moves.

Isn't that to be expected, though? I always thought it was the other way around: in the process of getting really good with a character, one eventually learns all or most of their moves as a natural consequence. Or rather, they especially learn which moves work (not many Bridget players use his Tragedy in Maintenance move, and not many Yoshimitsu players bother with his suicide attacks, for example).

NeutralDrow:

WhiteTigerShiro:
Yeah, Tekken was pretty bad about it too as I recall, but Soul Calibur is also terrible about it. It's a really easy game to button-mash, sure, but when you're as good as some of my friends, you need to really know how your character works. Which means memorizing an encyclopaedia of moves.

Isn't that to be expected, though? I always thought it was the other way around: in the process of getting really good with a character, one eventually learns all or most of their moves as a natural consequence. Or rather, they especially learn which moves work (not many Bridget players use his Tragedy in Maintenance move, and not many Yoshimitsu players bother with his suicide attacks, for example).

Well of course you have to learn the character's moves, but that's my point. With games like Soul Calibur, the moves list is simply massive. Sure you aren't going to use every single move, but how can a newer player be expected to know which moves he should learn and which he should ignore?

Then you get to games like Blaz Blue and Street Fighter. Every character has only a handful of moves to learn (with a couple exceptions for the more advanced characters). All it takes is a quick minute studying the moves list, a quick minute practicing the moves, and there you have it, everything you need to know about how your character moves. From here you can focus more on your personal technique and learning what situations are better for what attacks, rather than having to be bothered with losing a fight because you know there was that one attack you could have used to save yourself, but you have to spend about 5 minutes sorting through the moves list and trying each move before you finally find it.

So in short, the thing I like about this game is that it lets you focus more on your technique in fighting. Where I dislike Soul Calibur because it seems to focus more on knowing an encyclopaedia of moves before you can really start to practice.

Edit: Mind you, I'm not trying to say that Soul Calibur is a bad game by any means. Sale's figures alone would prove me wrong on that one. Just saying that it isn't my flavor of fighting game.

WhiteTigerShiro:

NeutralDrow:

WhiteTigerShiro:
Yeah, Tekken was pretty bad about it too as I recall, but Soul Calibur is also terrible about it. It's a really easy game to button-mash, sure, but when you're as good as some of my friends, you need to really know how your character works. Which means memorizing an encyclopaedia of moves.

Isn't that to be expected, though? I always thought it was the other way around: in the process of getting really good with a character, one eventually learns all or most of their moves as a natural consequence. Or rather, they especially learn which moves work (not many Bridget players use his Tragedy in Maintenance move, and not many Yoshimitsu players bother with his suicide attacks, for example).

Well of course you have to learn the character's moves, but that's my point. With games like Soul Calibur, the moves list is simply massive. Sure you aren't going to use every single move, but how can a newer player be expected to know which moves he should learn and which he should ignore?

I was trying to say that that happens automatically during the course of play. It requires a slightly different approach, but it still happens as a natural consequence.

Then you get to games like Blaz Blue and Street Fighter. Every character has only a handful of moves to learn (with a couple exceptions for the more advanced characters). All it takes is a quick minute studying the moves list, a quick minute practicing the moves, and there you have it, everything you need to know about how your character moves. From here you can focus more on your personal technique and learning what situations are better for what attacks, rather than having to be bothered with losing a fight because you know there was that one attack you could have used to save yourself, but you have to spend about 5 minutes sorting through the moves list and trying each move before you finally find it.

Except it isn't nearly that simple. I know it took me at least a month before I had a decent enough idea about how Axl Low worked before I could reliably beat other players with him.

In any case, it does seem to take different skills. If BlazBlue is an "easy to learn, hard to master" game, I can really only see Soul Calibur as medium difficulty for both. Movement in the game is simple already, so just learning the moves of character confers with it a lot of the skill you'll need, and it just becomes a matter of taking the ones you like, and training reflex and muscle memory.

Quite a few 2D games, on the other hand, don't give you a lot of training with the moveset. Sure, Archer in Fate/Unlimited Codes has a lot fewer moves than, say, Yun-Seong, but using them effectively doesn't come nearly as intuitively. Granted, that particular game has (hideously difficult) Training missions (including combo training, which take jump installs, buffering, and reflect canceling into account), but that's not an option for many others. I can't remember Guilty Gear teaching me how to use Sol Badguy's dust loop, or Street Fighter 3 teaching me how to use a given character's selected super in a combo (SF4 might be an exception, I haven't played it much).

So in short, the thing I like about this game is that it lets you focus more on your technique in fighting. Where I dislike Soul Calibur because it seems to focus more on knowing an encyclopaedia of moves before you can really start to practice.

And this I don't quite understand, because the majority of a Soul Calibur character's "encyclopedia of moves" are really, really simple (at least partly because they list normal attacks as well). For me, trying out a character for the first time is basically a litany of pressing a direction and a button (or running and pressing a button, or a direction and two buttons). Practice then becomes using the useful and cooler-looking ones in combat until they become natural. A lot of the more complicated stuff (unblockables, command throws, and the like) aren't especially useful, and can usually be ignored.

And this is where I break with Tekken, and its tremendously unintuitive movelists. Seriously, it's not that hard to figure out Nightmare's 66B+K (a guard-breaking dropkick), but how the heck would I normally figure out Armor King's f+1+4 (a shoulder charge)?

Edit: Mind you, I'm not trying to say that Soul Calibur is a bad game by any means. Sale's figures alone would prove me wrong on that one. Just saying that it isn't my flavor of fighting game.

And I can understand that. It's only those who refer to it as a button-masher's paradise who piss me off, and you've actually gone the opposite route.

EDIT: And here I completely forgot to throw in a Maxi/I-no comparison. Two different games, two different people, one with string stances, the other with an upward dash and odd moves...neither of which I can figure out. In other words, yeah, I do get that each has its own complications.

am i the only person who hasent posted something about the insane cheepness of jen
he's the only character than can imobalize other characters and he can do it with a single button press, then when he freezes you(which took no effort)he puts you in a combo
did i mention his spammy projectiles?

i only find him a problem because his freeze attacks have no down sides,and there to hard to break
they need to patch his attacks a lil because he's worse than n-13(or whatever the sword summon chick is named)when it comes to easy hits

for crying out loud you cant even block one of his freeze attacks unless you have god like timeing

also this isnt wineing, i have problems with no other character(even though ppl do abuse ragna's dash attacks and whatsherfaces's swords)

i guess what im trying to say is that ppl abuse sertain aspects of these characters(mostly jen)
and the developers eather need to make the characters harder to use or simply change there attacks so that way the game is completely ballanced

Wheee! I just got this game today, and had a balls out good time playing it. Though I did die when I first activated Bang Shishigami's super mode. I litterally fell out of my chair I was laughing so hard, which made it hard to play the game.

what platform(s) is this.

John Funk thinks that BlazBlue proves that anything with the word "Nu" in it is awesome.

Elfen Lied was proof of that.
Well I might be late to the party but the Funk pulls out a winner, and I'm off to order Blazblue. I mean seriously- how can you not buy a fighting game starring No-Face?

I cant wait to get BlazBlue ^^. Been youtubein and readin stuff on it alot lately, idk why i keep just skippin buyin it when i do get cash though >.>. Well i guess its cause i keep getting newer stuff like final fantasy xiii and mass effect 2 when i do get cash lol.

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