Neverwinter Nevermore

 Pages 1 2 NEXT
 

Neverwinter Nevermore

Players made BioWare's classic RPG special, not the other way around.

Read Full Article

Amazing how, in a few short years, $60 went from buying you a full game with more content and tools than you could ever hope to experience to just purchasing in-game currency that could easily be burned through in a month or two.

I have some really fond memories of this game and a module that sits half-done to this day. It is one of the only games that the devs actually encouraged you to tinker with everything about it and a community that would never fail to give you a straight answer to any problem you had as long as you asked it clearly. I was never a big multiplayer user, but many of the single player modules were awesome.

The dated graphics and dull campaign were fine with many, it was the potential to build decent D&D adventures easily even if I never did finish writing one. Thanks for the little nostalgia trip, and it was only ten years. :)

You know, I always meant to play neverwinter nights, but never got around to it.

Makes me sad to think that when I had time to do it, I did not. Now that I have no time to do so, I am drawn toward an experience like this.

The game described sounds a little like Eve but with less abstruse controls and odd rules enforced by the publishers.

Not to be 'that' guy (or kid more likely).

But the only game that has done the same giving up servers and multiplayer content creation to fans while not asking money beyond initial purchase is Minecraft.

Although admittedly not an RPG out of box. Many modders are busy inserting those systems.

I think back when I played NWN I had about 7-11GB of custom maps, which should really say something about the game.

I never got into Neverwinter nights, I was wanting a new Baldur's Gate. The game never garbed me at the start with big characters, like Minsc, and only having one other party member in single player caused me to lose interest. Reading your article sort makes me wish I had gone online a lot more than I did

Jeremy Monken:
Amazing how, in a few short years, $60 went from buying you a full game with more content and tools than you could ever hope to experience to just purchasing in-game currency that could easily be burned through in a month or two.

For a start to make a AAA game these days you need at least twice as many poeple to finish a title. Inflation over 10 years means in real terms the $60 then would be worth about $80 now.

I really want to install NeverWinter back on my laptop now.

Who would be down for running an online campaign together from Neverwinter to Hoardes of the Underdark?

Awww, nostalgia. I was blown away when I first realized what the Aurora toolset was. While I wasn't confident enough at the time to join multiplayer servers, I was neck-deep in user-made modules. The game's single-player campaign pales in comparison to some of those - I, in particular, was a fan of a series of short, expertly-crafted horror modules made by a guy by the name of (if I remember correctly) Chris Huntoon. They were very subtle, atmospheric and immersive, something few games of that generation were; though the modules needed these traits because of the engine's limitations; art from adversity, I suppose.

Yeah I spent a good bit of time playing this game back when I was in college. I wanted to comment on the article though, in addition to the 2 expansion packs Bioware did release a couple of smaller $10 campaigns for the game.

Oh so that's what people mean when they say they love Neverwinter Nights. I played through the single player campaign a year ago and thought it was dull as sh*t. I had heard the multilayer aspect was what made it good. but I never realized the scope of it.

I'm almost a little curious to check it out now, is it still alive? Is it still any fun?

Memories. Recently re-bought this game for 2.50. Nostalgia lane, here I come!

Ah sweet nostalgia.
I really enjoyed my time in NWN. The single player wasn't great after Baldur's Gate with the party of two people, but the multiplayer, oh the multiplayer.

*Sniff* That was beautiful man... :(

I always liked NWN. Never beat the campaign and only played a bit of the online but I really liked it. Now I want to reinstall my copy and try to find one of these amazing sounding servers. Are there many still around?

<- made the NWN horse system.

You're welcome. ;)

ThriKreen:
<- made the NWN horse system.

You're welcome. ;)

Showoff. :)

NWN was great, undertide was bad but UNDERDARK WAS AWESOME.

I remember playing a player made copy of diablo 1 which was better then the real diablo.

I always loved the NWN series and 2 wasn't bad, but the bugs and the fact obsidian made it which means the game was only half finished kept it from keeping my attention.

I'm actually looking at my copy of NWN platnium edition right now siting on the self above my computer right next to the folding box copy of fallout 1 & 2, all of which I'm tempted to replay.

CAPTCHA edit: Choose DISH, get out of my CAPTCHA commercialism!

JuliusMagnus:
Not to be 'that' guy (or kid more likely).

But the only game that has done the same giving up servers and multiplayer content creation to fans while not asking money beyond initial purchase is Minecraft.

Although admittedly not an RPG out of box. Many modders are busy inserting those systems.

Definitely Minecraft, but we should also remember Warcraft III. The editing software Blizzard included for free with the game spawned a huge online community dedicated to creating games of all different kinds, and the free multiplayer and dedicated servers of Battlenet kept it alive for ages. Game styles like MOBA were really born once the potentials of Warcraft III's editor were realised and the RPG elements of the game mechanics were fully utilised. Then there were racers, tower defences, top down shooters - even the vague skeletons of MMOs showed up from time to time with maps that utilised shared save systems where you could import a character from a different map you had played.

Starcraft II unfortunately killed off that potential by limiting the number of maps each person could create and adding fees for downloading certain maps. Personally, I view Warcraft III as the high water mark for Blizzard - from that point on it was less about "How much value can we give you for your money" and more about "How much of your money can we squeeze out of you."

E. T. Brooking:
Neverwinter Nevermore

Players made BioWare's classic RPG special, not the other way around.

Read Full Article

Amazing. What your article has described to me is a TRUE RPG experience on computer. People keep telling me that wow and it's ilk are RPGs but they aren't because the players and DMs are not the people creating and nurturing the world, it's the game developers. Because of this, wow and such are static, boring, glorified hunting games with little aspects of what role play gaming is about. Damn shame I never played Neverwinter Nights.

I've always been in the minority that prefers Neverwinter Nights 2 over the first, but that's also because I've always been more of a fan of singleplayer than multiplayer and as even the article points out; the singleplayer in the first NWN game was mediocre at absolute best.

Still if there's one thing that's ensured NWN 1 and 2 both always have a place on my hard drive it's the community modules. I've had more memorable and fun singleplayer rpg experience from those various modules than I have from any full-blown AAA rpg in years. And that the community for both NWN 1 and 2 continue to thrive and produce new content is testament to how good the games are as well as just... well, let's be honest here, how poorly the majority of newly released rpg support any sort of fan content.

Pity so few seem to know about the community however. Brilliant module like The Maimed God's Saga or Misery Stone I've always thought deserved more attention, they and many many others really are fantastic pieces of work.

Neverwinter Nights 1 and 2 still make a profit; a small one but it's a profit. Through word of mouth of these unique experiences friends and casual onlookers buy the game to see what all the fuss is about. While it is highly unlikely; interacting with the world to the level of depth NWN series offers can be such a captivating experience. Making unforeseen changes to the game world or actually becoming a "big bad" are two things that are almost impossible in the modern day MMO.

Just reinstalled NWN the other day, in anticipation of a particular NWN persistent world server some friends are just about done creating.

Sigh. I wish NWN2 hadnt so completely missed the point of the multiplayer.

The article mirrors my own thoughts. There just hasnt been an RPG with that degree of freedom since, and its a real shame. The way I phrase it is that everybody rushed headlong towards the profits they saw in MMOs... and completely forgot to look at simply "MOs". We have multiplayer, but only on a tiny scale - nowhere can you find a multiplayer RPG that will allow you to have 32 / 64 / 100 players. You play 2 or 3 person co-op, or play an MMO with thousands of strangers - those are your options.

Many of the mechanics that make up the appealing aspects of NWN seem to have become inextricably linked in the minds of developers with MMOs, when theres actually no need for it to be that way. "Persistent" play is seen as an MMO trait - you log in and the world is already happening around you; play continues round the clock after you leave, and the world keeps turning - but all it really needs is a basic server app with a small database system to save player variables, not some vast MMO server farm. More than a few players - we see it all the time for simple round based FPSs, and the communities that can be formed around them. Ive seen plenty of Call of Duty and Team Fortress servers which allow dozens of players at a time, where the players get to know each other; they hang out on forums and discuss up-coming ranked/clan matches, coordinate when theyre going to be online to catch up, and generally have a common community - you can drop in to the server at any time of day and see somebody you know. Again, theres no reason that needs to be unique to an MMO, yet for RPGs thats the only place youre going to find that situation.

It saddens me... its almost enough to get me to try and develop my own game along those lines, but I know how big of a task building an RPG is (especially solo).

I still play on the Neverwinter Nights persistant world servers from time to time. Prisoner's of the Mists. (PotM for short) is still my favorite by far. Gothic horror, heavy rp, with around 20 players online during the "bad hours," of EU/AU time zones. Active updates from devs to this day.

It's a shameless plug, but PotM deserves it. nwnravenloft.com for anyone who's interest I've sparked

And for anyone who's curious about how much the community has contributed to the game over the years, just take a look at CEP. (the Community Expansion Pack for NwN) It's sitting at around a Gig now, and it's packed full of... okay this is sounding too shameless even for me, but it's pretty darn amazing if you ask me.

Antiworld for life!

Greets!

I used to play on several NWN persistant worlds, true. The article is right about the sheer complexity of the multiplayer, all the worlds I played on were completely different from eachother in both in-game systems, lore and function.

I've played as a half-dragon, a heavily armoured arch-bishop of rightious death, a druid, a warlock, several vampires, a fallen angel and my greatest pride, but also greatest shame, a catgirl demon that shifts genders between herself and her captive host.

Oh the years I spent, the stories I've written, most of them lost with the passing of the NWN worlds. While I know many still exist and have players, I just dont have the will to form such stories and play in such worlds, not now, not after losing so many characters I have invested in.

Sure, I do ocassionally write the odd story nowdays, but never daily updates like I did years ago for these worlds.

Unfortunately for me, indulging in nostelgia with NWN now would only remind me of the years past and make me very sad, knowing that such games really are no more with the way gaming is developing.

ThriKreen:
<- made the NWN horse system.

You're welcome. ;)

Thanks mate.

Funny I should read this article while I'm installing NWN2 to rejoin my old buddies at ALFA again after a lengthy hiatus. ONWARDS!!!

I only got into NWN a few months ago when some friends were playing it, and I have to say, the depth of creation ability really is stunning.

I just know that the new baldurs gate will have nothing near it.

Littaly:
Oh so that's what people mean when they say they love Neverwinter Nights. I played through the single player campaign a year ago and thought it was dull as sh*t. I had heard the multilayer aspect was what made it good. but I never realized the scope of it.

I'm almost a little curious to check it out now, is it still alive? Is it still any fun?

The game is I think 10 bucks at Gog.com, and there are still several multiplayer servers available.

I'm going to go ahead and plug 12 Dark Secrets, which I am a DM on.(It wouldn't be proper for me as a DM not to plug it). I started playing on that server late 2005 or early 2006 because it wasn't a PVP server. The servers(yes it sounds odd, but the game world is so large it's mapped over 3 servers) are still up and running, and the code does the best it can to overcome RAM limitations imposed by a 32 bit game system, and other limitations that were added via patches.

I never played the first NWN and when i di buy the NWN2 the only way to get it to run was i had to physically disable the sound card on my computer. I never got more than an hour into the game as not having sound really spoils an experience for a game.

JuliusMagnus:
Not to be 'that' guy (or kid more likely).

But the only game that has done the same giving up servers and multiplayer content creation to fans while not asking money beyond initial purchase is Minecraft.

Although admittedly not an RPG out of box. Many modders are busy inserting those systems.

Yeah, that's the problem, isn't it? There was a time when a dev could put a toolkit for creating new worlds in their game system and it would just be another bullet point, just a cool thing for the hardcore fans. Nowadays we only have Minecraft, a world where you need tens of mods to turn it into anything other than a pointless faffing around simulator, and while the mod support is admirable it does mean that there is no central game you can work on, mods can enter in conflict, and you need to understand programming to do anything anyone will notice, unless you're wasting time by creating a giant sculpture that can only be seen on a computer.

We used to get excited because we could create brand new things, now we get excited because we can slap blocks together. We embrace less and less freedom - magic crayons made of shit - because the alternative is developers locking out mods so that they can sell you four weapons for fifteen dollars.

How far we've come.

This was the first RPG I ever played. Now I'm obsessed with the genre.

ThriKreen:
<- made the NWN horse system.

You're welcome. ;)

No way. Really? I never thought about the person behind the stuff I downloaded for that game... That's really cool.

Susan Arendt:

ThriKreen:
<- made the NWN horse system.

You're welcome. ;)

Showoff. :)

Someone's jealous :P

I love retro gaming, I bought Sid Meier's Alpha Centuri + expansion pack on ebay and love it heaps. I always had it on my computer, but lost the discs D:

Im still very fond of Neverwinter Nights. It was far from a perfect game but it was a game that always tried, and where you could tell the developers had really pushed the enevelope to deliver an experience. Maybe it was wishful thinking but i felt like it really mattered to BioWare that i enjoyed the experience, not just that i brought the game and thats something that has been sorely lacking in recent titles across the industry.

 Pages 1 2 NEXT

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here