Students Hack Unmanned Drone

 Pages PREV 1 2
 

Blablahb:
I'm a little disappointed to see the Escapist going along in American 'anything could be used for terrorism' paranoia.

Oh, fine.

"Glorious, we can use this to overthrow our evil librul regime. restore the Constitution and do away with healthcare"

Better?

I'm a little disappointed to see the Escapist going along in American 'anything could be used for terrorism' paranoia.

Elementary - Dear Watson:
I was also under the impression that the Military RPAS were protected against that kind of thing. Anti-Jammers exist... Also as GPS was originally made for the military they use a more encrypted, more accurate version than Civvi GPS devices, they also have the ability to just turn the GPS off around the whole world in an instant and restrict it to Military use only.

Not really. Glonass is not under US military control, and in a few years, Galileo will be ready as well. Especially Galileo will set the new standard as it's far more accurate and sophisticated than GPS. A system capable of switching between the networks can't have its navigation shut down from the network.

LordFish:
It's DUMB that they didn't encrypt the GPS signal, they should know that all information sent wireless should be encrypted, pretty damn cool though!

That doesn't protect it. Iran already hacked US military drones and captured them for instance.

Blablahb:
Not really. Glonass is not under US military control, and in a few years, Galileo will be ready as well. Especially Galileo will set the new standard as it's far more accurate and sophisticated than GPS. A system capable of switching between the networks can't have its navigation shut down from the network.

Ah, but Glonass and Galileo aren't [Brand Name] GPS. They are a type of GPS, but they are not [brand name] GPS, which is controlled by the US military. Even if the jammer can switch between systems it wouldn't matter if the US or UK (We arn't switching to Galileo either) aircraft is using the Military only GPS.

Also, Galileo isn't more accurate... only the civilian side will be, and coverage will be very limited.

albino boo:

LordFish:

YES, sorry, major DERP, GPS is a passive system... I guess I wasn't really thinking, however how did they then control the drone? the most I thought they could do was spoof its position...

I suspect the drone flies down a preprogrammed flightpath. If you alter where its think it is it will try and correct back to the flight path, thus giving you effective control of hight and direction. My guess is that speed is also calculated by GPS so you could even get control of the throttle.

The easiest way to guard against this attack is to fit an inertial navigation gyro and compare the results. A sudden massive change in GPS position could then be ignored.

RPAS and UAV's don't just fly on flight paths, they are just remotely piloted. (That's why RPAS is now the preferred acronym instead of UAV.) They do not just fly themselves, that is just a crazy rumour that has somehow spread by nutters who think 9-11 was a lie, and the holocaust didn't happen! :/

RPAS are flown by pilots who sit away from where the aircraft are. They can see through sensors on the aircraft itself, and have a team who help with air traffic and decluttering of the airspace. Large RPAS are piloted at the take off and landing points by a localised ground-pilot, and then control is passed to someone further away for the rest of the flight.

All the jamming did was allow the students to shange it's heading. They didn not get control of any of the sensors of the aircraft so all they had was an aircraft that they could alter it's course in a line-of-sight localised scenario.

I am also confused how this 'actual control' was taken, as they are not auto-piloted, so spoofing it's position shouldn't do anything... sounds like porkies are being spun here...

using drones to cause mass destruction by crashing them into people, buildings or vehicles at high speed.. brings back memories of playing shadowrun years ago.. i love my rigger

Hevva:
As the technology that powers these machines advances, private companies are becoming increasingly interested in possible domestic applications for the de-fanged, person-friendly cousins of the military's UAVs.

I'm more worried about what they intend to use these drones for. I think someone needs to ban their use for surveillance of citizens before things get out of hand.

Ooh, ooh, I will catch and tame a drone and make it my pet. It will bring me slippers, beer and will carry my groceries. Future, get in here, already!

If you aren't encrypting communications to your drone, then you entirely deserve it when it fires a missile/spies on you from above. I don't see why security should be treated differently from military applications, if a drone fell from the sky onto a crowded road then it could potentially cause a lot of damage by causing an accident.

LordFish:

Bvenged:

Unfortunately, with a little more expertise and funding even encrypted systems could be "spoofed" or "hacked". Nothing in the world of computers is immune, even isolated networks are at risk through human interference.

I put to you AES256 hard-coded public key encryption, my college prof said until they invent (if they invent) quantum computers, uncrackable. Yes if the system is designed with flaws than the encryption can be circumvented, but never encrypted data cracked. Just look at the financial sector, hackers can't log into their bank accounts and give themselfs millions of pounds... at least, I hope they can't :P

Too late, banks have been hacked years ago. Here's a few damning cyber-attacks that actually happened and could have the potential to ruin a country or the lives of people around the world.

4 Hackers Indicted in $9.5 Million Bank Card Attack - They conducted computer fraud by hacking a card company to stolen information and data which they then used to fraud nearly $10 million dollars from the bank. This happened in 2009:
http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2009/11/rbs-worldpay/

In 2007, Exstonia's entire electronic infrastructure went into lockdown:

The attacks, which started around April 27, have crippled Web sites for Estonia's prime minister, banks, and less-trafficked sites run by small schools, said Hillar Aarelaid, chief security officer for Estonia's Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT), on Thursday. But most of the affected Web sites have been able to restore service [after a period of time].
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9019725/Estonia_recovers_from_massive_DDoS_attack

While stealing hundreds of thousands of pounds isn't much to a bank, it's crippling to their repulation and thus, thier business. If you found out your bank was vulnerable and not so secure, would you let them look after your money? Bank hacked, money stolen over internet, crime syndicate to blame:
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/this-britain/three-arrested-in-first-internet-bank-robbery-710780.html

Oh, and Stuxnet and Flame show that you don't need to risk your people's lives or even cyber-hijack weaponry to harm, hamper or spy on an opposing nation: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-18393985


There are ways of getting around things with computers that are sometimes completely abstract. Once again, it wouldn't surprise me if some bright spark figured a way around the military-grade encryption without a quantum computer... or made a quantum computer and got through the encryption directly. The Enigma Cypher unbreakable in WWI, but the Polish cracked it; then the ever-more complicated nazi-germany evolutions were cracked in 1940 by British Intelligence.

I'm sure the military encryption is truly safe for now, and probably will be for years to come, but it's better to be safe than sorry and to keep developing more secure systems all the time. With the right security you can minimise risk but never remove it, but why would a malicious individual or group spend years cracking a nuke's launch system when you could do just as much harm, much more easily, when they could bring down numerous planes at once by neutralise several airports' air traffic control systems?
FAA's Air-Traffic Networks Breached by Hackers: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124165272826193727.html
UK Airport's Air Traffic Control Data Stolen: http://www.channel4.com/news/air-traffic-control-data-for-sale-on-ebay

Twilight_guy:
Also, lol at the guys who came here trying to make a joke related to FOX news but found an actual okay story.

Didn't notice the fear mongering, did you?

Bvenged:
So much snip

Exploiting "vulnerabilities in the system" and some sort of DDOS does not equate to decrypting or cracking anything like AES 256, or even 128.

LordFish:
Yes if the system is designed with flaws than the encryption can be circumvented, but never encrypted data cracked

Blablahb:

That doesn't protect it. Iran already hacked US military drones and captured them for instance.

Link? All I found was "By putting noise [jamming] on the communications, you force the bird into autopilot. This is where the bird loses its brain."

Gearhead mk2:

Hevva:
Source: Fox News

Move along people, nothing to see here. I know that this actually happened, but it's only a matter of time until Bill O'Reilly gets his hands on it and any and all truth will be lost.

You say that now, but I've yet to see you explain the tides.

Twilight_guy:
Also, lol at the guys who came here trying to make a joke related to FOX news but found an actual okay story.

FOX News mocked for fear-mongering. FOX News quotes a guy who almost says "9/11 times a thousand". I think we're good for the piss-take to go ahead.

Biodeamon:
You know its seems that students are always finding out better ways to things than the people trained to them. Maybe we should start sending students to the front line. call it "hands on learning".

This.

It's getting silly - students at home seem to do their country's jobs a thousand times better.

So some people worked out how to take control of an overly expensive, fancy RC plane well done.

Hevva:

Gearhead mk2:

Hevva:
Source: Fox News

Move along people, nothing to see here. I know that this actually happened, but it's only a matter of time until Bill O'Reilly gets his hands on it and any and all truth will be lost.

Heh. I was impressed that they went for "terrorists" in the headline though. No messing around in Fox Towers.

LOL! Only namby-pamby liberals show restraint with headlines... ;-)

Hevva:
Department of Homeland Security (DoHS) are interested in this spoofing development, with representatives from both agencies having reportedly invited the Austin team to repeat their trick under supervision.

... The next day China and north korea became barraged in they're own nukes...

even the basic GPS in our cell phones can encrypt the signal, its amazing that the drones didnt. If all they have to do to make this unusable is encrypt the signal (change frequency from a very popular one would also be a nice step) its not hard to countermeasure.

When I think of weaponised domestic UAVs, this is what i think of:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I2_xuzvza8c (I would embed it if I knew how)

Heh. When I first learned about ROVs being used by the military, my immediate mental image was of some little kid somewhere with a Tamiya RC rig taking control of one (maybe not even realizing he was doing it while flying his own plane). Scarily, sounds like I wasn't that far off the mark after all..

Technology gets stronger. But we got weaker. We built computers, robots, whole unmanned armies, and no one ever asked: what happens, when the enemy steals the keys?

Blablahb:
I'm a little disappointed to see the Escapist going along in American 'anything could be used for terrorism' paranoia.

that post could be used for terrorism. *stares at you*

 Pages PREV 1 2

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here